Galilee
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Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary
Galilee

wheel; revolution

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Galilee

(circuit). This name, which in the Roman age was applied to a large province, seems to have been originally confined to a little "circuit" of country round Kedesh-Naphtali, in which were situated the twenty towns given by Solomon to Hiram king of Tyre as payment for his work in conveying timber from Lebanon to Jerusalem. (Joshua 20:7; 1 Kings 9:11) In the time of our Lord all Palestine was divided into three provinces, Judea, Samaria and Galilee. (Luke 17:11; Acts 9:31) Joseph. B.J. iii. 3. The latter included the whole northern section of the country, including the ancient territories of Issachar, Zebulun, Asher and Naphtali. On the west it was bounded by the territory of Ptolemais, which probably included the whole plain of Akka to the foot of Carmel. The southern border ran along the base of Carmel and of the hills of Samaria to Mount Gilboa, and then descended the valley of Jezreel by Scythopolis to the Jordan. The river Jordan, the Sea of Galilee, and the upper Jordan to the fountain at Dan, formed the eastern border; and the northern ran from Dan westward across the mountain ridge till it touched the territory of the Phoenicians. Galilee was divided into two sections, "Lower" and "Upper." Lower Galilee included the great plain of Esdraelon with its offshoots, which ran down to the Jordan and the Lake of Tiberias, and the whole of the hill country adjoining it on the north to the foot of the mountain range. It was thus one of the richest and most beautiful sections of Pales-tine. Upper Galilee embraced the whole mountain range lying between the upper Jordan and Phoenicia. To this region the name "Galilee of the Gentiles" is given in the Old and New Testaments. (Isaiah 9:1; Matthew 4:16) Galilee was the scene of the greater part of our Lord's private life and public acts. It is a remarkable fact that the first three Gospels are chiefly taken up with our Lord's ministrations in this province, while the Gospel of John dwells more upon those in Judea. (Galilee in the time of Christ . --From Rev. Selah Merrill's late book (1881) with this title, we glean the following facts: Size . --It is estimated that of the 1000 square miles in Palestine west of the Jordan, nearly one-third, almost 2000 square miles, belongs to Galilee. Population --The population is between 2,000,000 and 3,000,000. Dr. Merrill argues for the general correctness of Josephus' estimates, who says there were 204 cities and villages in Galilee, the smallest of which numbered 15,000 inhabitants. Character of the country . Galilee was a region of great natural fertility. Such is the fertility of the soil that it rejects no plant, for the air is so genial that it suits every variety. The walnut, which delights above other trees in a wintry climate, grows here luxuriantly together with the palm tree, which is flourished by heat. It not only possesses the extraordinary virtue of nourishing fruits of opposite climes, but also maintains a continual supply of them. Here were found all the productions which made Italy rich and beautiful. Forests covered its mountains and hills, while its uplands, gentle slopes and broader valleys were rich in pasture, meadows, cultivated fields, vineyards, olive groves and fruit trees of every kind. Character of the Galileans .--They were thoroughly a Jewish people. With few exceptions they were wealthy and in general an influential class. If one should say the Jews were bigoted in religion, he should remember at the same time that in regard to social, commercial and political relations none were more cosmopolitan in either sentiment or practice than they. The Galileans had many manufactures, fisheries, some commerce, but were chiefly an agricultural people. They were eminent for patriotism and courage, as were their ancestors, with great respect for law and order.--ED.)

ATS Bible Dictionary
Galilee

In the time of Christ, included all the northern part of Palestine lying west of the Jordan and north of Samaria. Before the exile the name seems to have been applied only to a small tract bordering on the northern limits, 1 Kings 9:11. Galilee, in the time of Christ, was divided into Upper and Lower, the former lying north of the territory of the tribe of Zebulun, and abounding in mountains; the latter being more level and fertile, and very populous; the whole comprehending the four tribes of Issachar, Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher. Lower Galilee is aid to have contained four hundred and four towns and villages, of which Josephus mentions Tiberias, Sepphoris, and Gabara, as the principal; though Capernaum and Nazareth are the most frequently mentioned in the New Testament, Mark 1:9 Luke 2:39 John 7:52, etc. "Galilee of the Gentiles" is supposed to be Upper Galilee, either because it bordered on Tyre and Zidon, or because Phenicians, Syrians, Arabs, and other heathen were numerous among it inhabitants. The Galileans were accounted brave and industrious; though other Jews affected to consider them as not only stupid and unpolished, but also seditious, and therefore proper objects of contempt, Luke 13:1 23:6 John 1:47 7:52. They appear to have used a peculiar dialect, by which they were easily distinguished from the Jews of Jerusalem, Mark 14:70. Many of the apostles and first converts to Christianity were men of Galilee, Acts 1:11 2:7, as well as Christ himself; and the name Galilean was often given as an insult, both to him and his followers. The apostate emperor Julian constantly used it, and in his dying agony and rage cried out, "O Galilean, thou hast conquered!" Our Savior resided here from infancy till he was thirty years of age, and during much of his public ministry; and the cities of his public ministry; and the cities of Nazareth, Nain, Cana, Capernaum, with the whole region of the sea of Galilee, are sacredly endeared to all his people by the words he there spoke, and the wonders he wrought. For the Sea of Galilee, see SEA3

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Circuit. Solomon rewarded Hiram for certain services rendered him by the gift of an upland plain among the mountains of Naphtali. Hiram was dissatisfied with the gift, and called it "the land of Cabul" (q.v.). The Jews called it Galil. It continued long to be occupied by the original inhabitants, and hence came to be called "Galilee of the Gentiles" (Matthew 4:15), and also "Upper Galilee," to distinguish it from the extensive addition afterwards made to it toward the south, which was usually called "Lower Galilee." In the time of our Lord, Galilee embraced more than one-third of Western Palestine, extending "from Dan on the north, at the base of Mount Hermon, to the ridges of Carmel and Gilboa on the south, and from the Jordan valley on the east away across the splendid plains of Jezreel and Acre to the shores of the Mediterranean on the west." Palestine was divided into three provinces, Judea, Samaria, and Galilee, which comprehended the whole northern section of the country (Acts 9:31), and was the largest of the three.

It was the scene of some of the most memorable events of Jewish history. Galilee also was the home of our Lord during at least thirty years of his life. The first three Gospels are chiefly taken up with our Lord's public ministry in this province. "The entire province is encircled with a halo of holy associations connected with the life, works, and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth." "It is noteworthy that of his thirty-two beautiful parables, no less than ninteen were spoken in Galilee. And it is no less remarkable that of his entire thirty-three great miracles, twenty-five were wrought in this province. His first miracle was wrought at the wedding in Cana of Galilee, and his last, after his resurrection, on the shore of Galilee's sea. In Galilee our Lord delivered the Sermon on The Mount, and the discourses on `The Bread of Life,' on `Purity,' on 'Forgiveness,' and on `Humility.' In Galilee he called his first disciples; and there occurred the sublime scene of the Transfiguration" (Porter's Through Samaria).

When the Sanhedrin were about to proceed with some plan for the condemnation of our Lord (John 7:45-52), Nicodemus interposed in his behalf. (Comp. Deuteronomy 1:16, 17; 17:8.) They replied, "Art thou also of Galilee?.... Out of Galilee ariseth no prophet." This saying of theirs was "not historically true, for two prophets at least had arisen from Galilee, Jonah of Gath-hepher, and the greatest of all the prophets, Elijah of Thisbe, and perhaps also Nahum and Hosea. Their contempt for Galilee made them lose sight of historical accuracy" (Alford, Com.).

The Galilean accent differed from that of Jerusalem in being broader and more guttural (Mark 14:70).

Galilee, Sea of

(Matthew 4:18; 15:29), is mentioned in the Bible under three other names.

(1.) In the Old Testament it is called the "sea of Chinnereth" (Numbers 34:11; Joshua 12:3; 13:27), as is supposed from its harp-like shape. (2). The "lake of Gennesareth" once by Luke (5:1), from the flat district lying on its west coast.

(3.) John (6:1; 21:1) calls it the "sea of Tiberias" (q.v.). The modern Arabs retain this name, Bahr Tabariyeh.

This lake is 12 1/2 miles long, and from 4 to 7 1/2 broad. Its surface is 682 feet below the level of the Mediterranean. Its depth is from 80 to 160 feet. The Jordan enters it 10 1/2 miles below the southern extremity of the Huleh Lake, or about 26 1/2 miles from its source. In this distance of 26 1/2 miles there is a fall in the river of 1,682 feet, or of more than 60 feet to the mile. It is 27 miles east of the Mediterranean, and about 60 miles north-east of Jerusalem. It is of an oval shape, and abounds in fish.

Its present appearance is thus described: "The utter loneliness and absolute stillness of the scene are exceedingly impressive. It seems as if all nature had gone to rest, languishing under the scorching heat. How different it was in the days of our Lord! Then all was life and bustle along the shores; the cities and villages that thickly studded them resounded with the hum of a busy population; while from hill-side and corn-field came the cheerful cry of shepherd and ploughman. The lake, too, was dotted with dark fishing-boats and spangled with white sails. Now a mournful, solitary silence reigns over sea and shore. The cities are in ruins!"

This sea is chiefly of interest as associated with the public ministry of our Lord. Capernaum, "his own city" (Matthew 9:1), stood on its shores. From among the fishermen who plied their calling on its waters he chose Peter and his brother Andrew, and James and John, to be disciples, and sent them forth to be "fishers of men" (Matthew 4:18, 22; Mark 1:16-20; Luke 5: 1-11). He stilled its tempest, saying to the storm that swept over it, "Peace, be still" (Matthew 8:23-27; Mark 7:31-35); and here also he showed himself after his resurrection to his disciples (John 21).

"The Sea of Galilee is indeed the cradle of the gospel. The subterranean fires of nature prepared a lake basin, through which a river afterwards ran, keeping its waters always fresh. In this basin a vast quantity of shell-fish swarmed, and multiplied to such an extent that they formed the food of an extraordinary profusion of fish. The great variety and abundance of the fish in the lake attracted to its shores a larger and more varied population than existed elsewhere in Palestine, whereby this secluded district was brought into contact with all parts of the world. And this large and varied population, with access to all nations and countries, attracted the Lord Jesus, and induced him to make this spot the centre of his public ministry."

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
(n.) A porch or waiting room, usually at the west end of an abbey church, where the monks collected on returning from processions, where bodies were laid previous to interment, and where women were allowed to see the monks to whom they were related, or to hear divine service. Also, frequently applied to the porch of a church, as at Ely and Durham cathedrals.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CANA, OF GALILEE

ka'-na, (Kana tes Galilaias): This was the scene of Christ's earliest miracle, when, at the marriage feast, He turned water into wine (John 2:1). It was the home of Nathaniel (John 21:2). From Cana, after the marriage, Jesus "went down" to Capernaum (John 2:12), and returned at the request of the centurion (John 4:46, 51). These are the only notices of Cana in Scripture, and from them we learn merely that it was in Galilee, and in the uplands West of the lake. Other villages of the same name are mentioned by Josephus, but probably this one is intended by the Cana where for a time he dwelt (Vita, 16) which he locates in the plain of Asochis (ibid., 41). The Greek kana probably transliterates an old Hebrew qanah, "place of reeds." This ancient name survives in Khirbet Qana, a ruined site with rockhewn tombs, cisterns and a pool, on the northern edge of Sahl el-Battauf, the plain of Asochis. Near by are marshy stretches where reeds still abound: the name therefore is entirely appropriate. The name Qana el-Jelil, the exact Arabic equivalent of Kana tes Galilaias, is also heard among the natives. This, however, may have arisen from the suggested identification with Cana of the Gospel. The position agrees well enough with the Gospel data.

Kefr Kennah, a thriving village about 3 3/4 miles from Nazareth, on the southern edge of Sahl Tor`an, the plain South of the range of that name, through which the road from Nazareth to Tiberias passes, has also many advocates. This identification is accepted by the Greek and Latin churches, which have both built extensively in the village; the Greeks showing stone jars said to have been used in the miracle, and the traditional house of Nathaniel being pointed out. A copious spring of excellent water rises West of the village; and the pomegranates grown here are greatly prized. The change of name, however, from Qana to Kennah-(note the doubled n), is not easy; and there are no reeds in the neighborhood to give the name any appropriateness.

Onom locates Cana in the tribe of Asher toward Great Sidon, probably thinking of Kana, a village about 8 miles South of Tyre. The pilgrims of the Middle Ages seem to be fairly divided as to the two sites. Saewulf (1102), Brocardius (1183), Marinus Sanutus (1321), Breydenbach (1483) and Anselm (1507) favor the northern site; while on the side of Kefr Kennah may be reckoned Paula (383), Willibald (720), Isaac Chelo (1334) and Quaresimus (1616). It seems pretty certain that the Crusaders adopted the identification with Khirbet Kana (Conder, Tent Work, 69). While no absolute decision is possible, on the available evidence probability points to the northern site.

Col. Conder puts in a claim for a third site, that of `Ain Kana on the road from er-Reineh (a village about 1 1/2 mile from Nazareth on the Tiberias road) to Tabor (Tent Work, 81).

W. Ewing

GALILEE

gal'-i-le (ha-galil, hagelilah, literally, "the circuit" or "district"; he Galilaia):

1. Galilee of the Nations:

Kedesh, the city of refuge, is described as lying in Galilee, in Mt. Naphtali (Joshua 20:7; compare Joshua 21:32). The name seems originally to have referred to the territory of Naphtali. Joshua's victorious campaign in the north (Joshua 11), and, subsequently, the triumph of the northern tribes under Deborah and Barak (Judges 4 f) gave Israel supremacy; yet the tribe of Naphtali was not able to drive out all the former inhabitants of the land (Judges 1:33). In the time of Solomon the name applied to a much wider region, including the territory of Asher. In this land lay the cities given by Solomon to Hiram (1 Kings 9:11). Cabul here named must be identical with that of Joshua 19:27. The Asherites also failed to possess certain cities in their allotted portion, so that the heathen continued to dwell among them. To this state of things, probably, is due the name given in Isaiah 9:1 to this region, "Galilee of the nations," i.e. a district occupied by a mixed population of Jews and heathen. It may also be referred to in Joshua 12:23, where possibly we should read "king of the nations of Galilee" (legalil), instead of "Gilgal" (begilgal). Yet it was within this territory that, according to 2 Samuel 20:18 (Septuagint) lay the two cities noted for their preservation of ancient Israelite religious customs in their purity-Abel-bethmaacah and Dan.

2. Ancient Boundaries:

There is nothing to guide us as to the northern boundary of Galilee in the earliest times. On the East it was bounded by the upper Jordan and the Sea of Galilee, and on the South by the plain of el-BaTTauf. That all within these limits belonged to Galilee we may be sure. Possibly, however, it included Zebulun, which seems to be reckoned to it in Isaiah 9:1. In this territory also there were unconquered Canaanite cities (Judges 1, 30).

3. Before the Exile:

At the instigation of Asa, king of Judah, Benhadad, son of Tabrimmon of Damascus, moved against Israel, and the cities which he smote all lay within the circle of Galilee (1 Kings 15:20). Galilee must have been the arena of conflict between Jehoahaz and Hazael, king of Syria. The cities which the latter captured were recovered from his son Benhadad by Joash, who defeated him three times (2 Kings 10:32; 2 Kings 13:22). The affliction of Israel nevertheless continued "very bitter," and God saved them by the hand of Jeroboam son of Joash, the great warrior monarch of the Northern Kingdom, under whom Galilee passed completely into the hands of Israel (2 Kings 14:25). But the days of Israel's supremacy in Northern Palestine were nearly over. The beginning of the end came with the invasion of Tiglath-pileser III, who took the chief cities in Galilee, and sent their inhabitants captive to Assyria (2 Kings 14:29). Probably, as in the case of the Southern Kingdom, the poorest of the land were left as husbandmen. At any rate there still remained Israelites in the district (2 Chronicles 30:10 f); but the measures taken by the conqueror must have made for the rapid increase of the heathen element.

4. After the Exile:

In post-exilie times Galilee is the name given to the most northerly of the three divisions of Western Palestine. The boundaries are indicated by Josephus (BJ, III, iii, 1). It was divided into Lower and Upper Galilee, and was encompassed by Phoenicia and Syria. It marched with Ptolemais and Mt. Carmel on the West. The mountain, formerly Galliean, now belonged to the Syrians. On the South it adjoined Samaria and Scythopolis (Beisan) as far as the river Jordan. It was bounded on the East by Hippene, Gadara, Gaulonitis and the borders of the kingdom of Agrippa, while the northern frontier was marked by Tyre and the country of the Tyrians. The northern limit of Samaria was Ginea, the modern Jenin, on the south border of Esdraelon. Lower Galilee, therefore, included the great plain, and stretched northward to the plain of er-Rameh-Ramah of Joshua 19:36. Josephus mentions Bersabe, the modern Abu-Sheba, and the Talmud, Kephar Chananyah, the modern Kefr `Anan, as the northern border; the former being about a mile North of the latter. The plain reaches to the foot of the mountain chain, which, running East and West, forms a natural line of division. Upper Galilee may have included the land as far as the gorge of the LiTany, which, again, would have formed a natural boundary to the N. Josephus, however, speaks of Kedesh as belonging to the Syrians (BJ, II, xviii, 1), situated "between the land of the Tyrians and Galilee" (Ant., XIII, v, 6). This gives a point on the northern frontier in his time; but the rest is left indefinite. Guthe, Sunday and others, followed by Cheyne (EB, under the word), on quite inadequate grounds conclude that certain localities on the East of the Sea of Galilee were reckoned as Galilean.

5. Character of the Galileans:

In the mixed population after the exile the purely Jewish element must have been relatively small. In 165 B.C. Simon Maccabeus was able to rescue them from their threatening neighbors by carrying the whole community away to Judea (1 Maccabees 5:14). Josephus tells of the conquest by Aristobulus I of Ituraea (Ant., XIII, xi, 3). He compelled many of them to adopt Jewish religious customs, and to obey the Jewish law. There can be little doubt that Galilee and its people were treated in the same way. While Jewish in their religion, and in their patriotism too, as subsequent history showed, the population of Galilee was composed of strangely mingled elements-Aramaean, Iturean, Phoenician and Greek In the circumstances they could not be expected to prove such sticklers for high orthodoxy as the Judeans. Their mixed origin explains the differences in speech which distinguished them from their brethren in the South, who regarded Galilee and the Galileans with a certain proud contempt (John 1:46; John 7:52). But a fine type of manhood was developed among the peasant farmers of the two Galilees which, according to Josephus (BJ, III, iii, 2), were "always able to make a strong resistance on all occasions of war; for the Galileans are inured to war from their infancy. nor hath the country ever been destitute of men of courage." Josephus, himself a Galilean, knew his countrymen well, and on them he mainly relied in the war with Rome. In Galilee also the Messianic hope was cherished with the deepest intensity. When the Messiah appeared, with His own Galilean upbringing, it was from the north-countrymen that He received the warmest welcome, and among them His appeal elicited the most gratifying response.

6. Later History:

In 47 B.C., Herod the Great, then a youth of 25, was made military commander of Galilee, and won great applause by the fashion in which he suppressed a band of robbers who had long vexed the country (Ant., XIV, ix, 2). When Herod came to the throne, 37 B.C., a period of peace and prosperity for Galilee began, which lasted till the banishment of his son Antipas in 40 A.D. The tetrarchy of Galilee was given to the latter at his father's death, 4 B.C. His reign, therefore, covered the whole life of Jesus, with the exception of His infancy. After the banishment of Antipas, Galilee was added to the dominions of Agrippa I, who ruled it till his death in 44 A.D. Then followed a period of Roman administration, after which it was given to Agrippa II, who sided with the Romans in the subsequent wars, and held his position till 100 A.D. The patriotic people, however, by no means submitted to his guidance. In their heroic struggle for independence, the command of the two Galilees, with Gamala, was entrusted to Josephus, who has left a vivid narrative, well illustrating the splendid courage of his freedom-loving countrymen. But against such an adversary as Rome even their wild bravery could not prevail; and the country soon lay at the feet of the victorious Vespasian, 67 A.D. There is no certain knowledge of the part played by Galilee in the rebellion under Hadrian, 132-35 A.D.

At the beginning of the Roman period Sepphoris (Cafuriyeh), about 3 miles North of Nazareth, took the leading place. Herod Antipas, however, built a new city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, which, in honor of the reigning emperor, he called Tiberias. Here he reared his "golden house," and made the city the capital of his tetrarchy. SeeTIBERIAS. After the fall of Jerusalem, Galilee, which had formerly been held in contempt, became the home of Jewish learning, and its chief seat was found in Tiberias where the Mishna was committed to writing, and the Jerusalem Talmud was composed. Thus a city into which at first no pious Jew would enter, in a province which had long been despised by the leaders of the nation, became the main center of their national and religious life.

7. Cities of Galilee:

Among the more notable cities in Galilee were Kedesh Naphtali, the city of refuge, the ruins of which lie on the heights West of el-Chuleh; Chorazin, Bethsaida and Capernaum, North of the Sea of Galilee; Nazareth, the city of the Savior's youth and young manhood; Jotapata, the scene of Josephus' heroic defense against the Romans, which stood at Tell Jefat, North of the plain of Asochis (BJ, III, vii, viii); Cana of Galilee; and Nain, on the northern slope of the mountain now called Little Hermon.

8. General Description:

In physical features Galilee is the most richly diversified and picturesque district in Western Palestine; while in beauty and fertility it is strongly contrasted with the barren uplands of Judah. Cut off from Mt. Lebanon in the North by the tremendous gorge of the Litany, it forms a broad and high plateau, sinking gradually southward until it approaches Cafed, when again it rises, culminating in Jebel Jermuk, the highest summit on the West of the Jordan. From Cafed there is a rapid descent by stony slope and rocky precipice to the shore of the Sea of Galilee. The mountains of which Jebel Jermuk is the Northeast outrunner stretch westward across the country, and drop upon the plain of er-Rameh to the South. Irregular hills and valleys, with breadths of shady woodlands, lie between this plain and that of Asochis (el-Battauf). The latter is split from the East by the range of Jebel Tor`an. South of Asochis rise lower hills, in a cup-like hollow among which lies the town of Nazareth. South of the town they sink steeply into the plain of Esdraelon. The isolated form of Tabor stands out on the East, while Carmel bounds the view on the West. The high plateau in the North terminates abruptly at the lip of the upper Jordan valley. As the Jordan runs close to the base of the eastern hills, practically all this valley, with its fine rolling downs, is included in Galilee. The plain of Gennesaret runs along the northwestern shore of the Sea of Galilee. From the uplands to the West, stretching from Qurun Chattin (the traditional Mount of Beatitudes) to the neighborhood of Tabor, the land lets itself down in a series of broad and fertile terraces, falling at last almost precipitously on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee. The descent toward the Mediterranean is much more gradual; and the soil gathered in the longer valleys is deep and rich.

The district may be described as comparatively well watered. The Jordan with its mighty springs is, of course, too low for purposes of irrigation. But there are many perennial streams fed by fountains among the hills. The springs at Jenin are the main sources of the river Kishon, but for the greater part of its course through the plain the bed of that river is far below the surface of the adjoining land. The dews that descend from Lebanon and Hermon are also a perpetual source of moisture and refreshment.

9. Products:

Galilee was famous in ancient times for its rich and fruitful soil, "full of the plantations of trees of all sorts, insomuch that it invites the most slothful to pains in its cultivation by its fruitfulness; accordingly it is all cultivated by its inhabitants, and no part of it lies idle" (BJ, III, iii, 2). See also GENNESARET, LAND OF. The grapes grown in Naphtali were in high repute, as were the pomegranates of Shikmona-the Sykaminos of Josephus-which stood on the shore near Mt. Carmel. The silver sheen of the olive meets the eye in almost every valley; and the olive oil produced in Galilee has always been esteemed of the highest excellence. Its wheat fields also yielded an abundant supply, the wheat of Chorazin being proverbial. The great plain of Esdraelon must also have furnished rich provision. It cannot be doubted that Galilee was largely drawn upon for the gifts in kind which Solomon bestowed upon the king of Tyre (2 Chronicles 2:10). At a much later day the inhabitants of Tyre and Sidon depended upon the produce of Galilee (Acts 12:20).

Galilee was in easy touch with the outside world by means of the roads that traversed her valleys, crossed her ridges and ran out eastward, westward and southward. Thus she was connected with the harbors on the Phoenician seaboard, with Egypt on the South, with Damascus on the Northeast, and with the markets of the East by the great caravan routes (see "Roads" under PALESTINE).

10. Contact with the Outside World:

In the days of Christ the coming and going of the merchantmen, the passing of armies and the movements of the representatives of the Empire, must have made these highways a scene of perpetual activity, touching the dwellers in Galilee with the widening influences of the great world's life.

11. Population:

The peasant farmers of Galilee, we have seen, were a bold and enterprising race. Encouraged by the fruitfulness of their country, they were industrious cultivators of the soil. Josephus estimates the population at 3,000,000. This may be an exaggeration; but here we have all the conditions necessary for the support of a numerous and prosperous people. This helps us to understand the crowds that gathered round and followed Jesus in this district, where the greater part of His public life was spent. The cities, towns and villages in Galilee are frequently referred to in the Gospels. That the Jewish population in the centuries immediately after Christ was numerous and wealthy is sufficiently proved by the remains from those times, especially the ruins of synagogues, e.g. those at Tell Chum, Kerazeh, Irbid, el-Jish, Kefr Bir`im, Meiron, etc. Near the last named is shown the tomb of the great Jewish teacher Hillel.

Galilee was not without her own heroic memories. The great battlefields of Megiddo, Gilboa, and the waters of Merom lay within her borders; and among the famous men of the past she could claim Barak, Ibzan, Elon and Tola of the judges; of the prophets, Jonah and Elisha at least; possibly also Hosea who, according to a Jewish tradition, died in Babylon, but was brought to Galilee and buried in Cafed (Neubauer, Geog. der Talmud, 227). When the chief priests and Pharisees said, "Search, and see that out of Galilee ariseth no prophet," it argued strange and inexcusable ignorance on their part (John 7:52). Perhaps, however, in this place we should read ho prophetes, "the prophet," i.e. the Messiah. It is significant that 11 out of the 12 apostles were Galileans.

For detailed description of the country, see ISSACHAR; ASHER; ZEBULUN; NAPHTALI; see also GALILEE, SEA OF.

W. Ewing

GALILEE, MOUNTAIN IN

After the resurrection the disciples "went into Galilee, unto the mountain where Jesus had appointed them" (Matthew 28:16). Here Jesus came to them, declared that all authority in heaven and earth had been given to Him, commanded them to go and make disciples of all nations, concluding with the memorable promise: "Lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world." Probably it was some well-known height not far from the scenes most frequented during the Galilean ministry. Looking from the western shore at the uplands North of the lake, it is not easy to imagine a more appropriate spot for this never-to-be-forgotten interview than Jebel Qan`-an, a bold headland not far to the East of Cafed, overlooking the land of Gennesaret and the sea, and commanding from its lofty summit a view of about 80 miles in every direction. Of course, there is no certainty.

W. Ewing

GALILEE, SEA OF

(he thalassa tes Galilaias):

1. The Name:

This is the name 5 times given in the New Testament (Matthew 4:18; Matthew 15:29 Mark 1:16; Mark 7:31 John 6:1) to the sheet of water which is elsewhere called "the sea of Tiberias" (John 21:1; compare John 6:1); "the lake of Gennesaret" (Luke 5:1); "the sea" (John 6:16, etc.), and "the lake" (Luke 5:1, etc.). The Old Testament names were "sea of Chinnereth" (yam-kinnereth: Numbers 34:11 Deuteronomy 3:17 Joshua 13:27; Joshua 19:35), and "sea of Chinneroth" (yam-kineroth: Joshua 12:3; compare 11:2; 1 Kings 15:20). In 1 Maccabees 11:67 the sea is called "the water of Gennesar" (the Revised Version (British and American) "Gennesareth"). It had begun to be named from the city so recently built on its western shore even in New Testament times (John 21:1; John 6:1); and by this name, slightly modified, it is known to this day-Bachr Tabariyeh.

2. General Description:

The sea lies in the deep trough of the Jordan valley, almost due East of the Bay of Acre. The surface is 680 ft. below the level of the Mediterranean. It varies in depth from 130 ft. to 148 ft., being deepest along the course of the Jordan (Barrois, PEFS, 1894, 211-20). From the point where the Jordan enters in the North to its exit in the South is about 13 miles. The greatest breadth is in the North, from el-Mejdel to the mouth of Wady Semak being rather over 7 miles. It gradually narrows toward the South, taking the shape of a gigantic pear, with a decided bulge to the West. The water of the lake is clear and sweet. The natives use it for all purposes, esteeming it light and pleasant. They refuse to drink from the Jordan, alleging that "who drinks Jordan drinks fever." Seen from the mountains the broad sheet appears a beautiful blue; so that, in the season of greenery, it is no exaggeration to describe it as a sapphire in a setting of emerald. It lights up the landscape as the eye does the human face; and it is often spoken of as "the eye of Galilee." To one descending from Mt. Tabor and approaching the edge of the great hollow, on a bright spring day, when the land has already assumed its fairest garments, the view of the sea, as it breaks upon the vision in almost its whole extent, is one never to be forgotten. The mountains on the East and on the West rise to about 2,000 ft. The heights of Naphtali, piled up in the North, seem to culminate only in the snowy summit of Great Hermon. If the waters are still, the shining splendors of the mountain may be seen mirrored in the blue depths. Round the greater part of the lake there is a broad pebbly beach, with a sprinkling of small shells. On the sands along the shore from el-Mejdel to `Ain et-Tineh these shells are so numerous as to cause a white glister in the sunlight.

The main formation of the surrounding district is limestone. It is overlaid with lava; and here and there around the lake there are outcrops of basalt through the limestone. At eT-Tabgha in the North, at `Ain el Fuliyeh, South of el-Mejdel, and on the shore, about 2 miles South of modern Tiberias, there are strong hot springs. These things, together with the frequent, and sometimes terribly destructive, earthquakes, sufficiently attest the volcanic character of the region. The soil on the level parts around the sea is exceedingly fertile. See GENNESARET, LAND OF. Naturally the temperature in the valley is higher than that of the uplands; and here wheat and barley are harvested about a month earlier. Frost is not quite unknown; but no one now alive remembers it to have done more than lay the most delicate fringe of ice around some of the stones on the shore. The fig and the vine are still cultivated with success. Where vegetable gardens are planted they yield plentifully. A few palms are still to be seen. The indigo plant is grown in the plain of Gennesaret. In their season the wild flowers lavish a wealth of lovely colors upon the surrounding slopes; while bright-blossoming oleanders fringe the shore.

Coming westward from the point where the Jordan enters the lake, the mountains approach within a short distance of the sea. On the shore, fully 2 miles from the Jordan, are the ruins of Tell Chum. See CAPERNAUM. About 2 miles farther West are the hot springs of eT-Tabgha. Here a shallow vale breaks northward, bounded on the West by Tell `Areimeh. This tell is crowned by an ancient Canaanite settlement. It throws out a rocky promontory into the sea, and beyond this are the ruins of Khan Minyeh, with `Ain et-Tineh close under the cliff. Important Roman remains have recently been discovered here. From this point the plain of Gennesaret (el-Ghuweir) sweeps round to el-Mejdel, a distance of about 4 miles. West of this village opens the tremendous gorge, Wady el Chamam, with the famous robbers' fastnesses in its precipitous sides, and the ruins of Arbela on its southern lip. From the northern parts of the lake the Horns of ChaTTin, the traditional Mount of Beatitudes, may be seen through the rocky jaws of the gorge. South of el-Mejdel the mountains advance to the shore, and the path is cut in the face of the slope, bringing us to the hot spring, `Ain el-Fuliyeh, where is a little valley, with gardens and orange grove. The road then crosses a second promontory, and proceeds along the base of the mountain to Tiberias. Here the mountains recede from the shore, leaving a crescent-shaped plain, largely covered with the ruins of the ancient city. The modern town stands at the northern corner of the plain; while at the southern end are the famous hot baths, the ancient Hammath. A narrow ribbon of plain between the mountain and the shore runs to the South end of the lake. There the Jordan, issuing from the sea, almost surrounds the mound on which are the ruins of Kerak, the Tarichea of Josephus Crossing the floor of the valley, past Semakh, which is now a station on the Haifa-Damascus railway, we find a similar strip of plain along the eastern shore. Nearly opposite Tiberias is the stronghold of Chal`-at el Chocn, possibly the ancient Hippos, with the village of Fik, the ancient Aphek, on the height to the East. To the North of this the waters of the sea almost touch the foot of the steep slope. A herd of swine running headlong down the mountain would here inevitably perish in the lake (Matthew 8:32, etc.). Next, we reach the mouth of Wady Semak, in which lie the ruins of Kurseh, probably representing the ancient Gerasa. Northward the plain widens into the marshy breadths of el-BaTeichah, and once more we reach the Jordan, flowing smoothly through the fiat lands to the sea.

3. Storms:

The position of the lake makes it liable to sudden storms, the cool air from the uplands rushing down the gorges with great violence and tossing the waters in tumultuous billows. Such storms are fairly frequent, and as they are attended with danger to small craft, the boatmen are constantly on the alert. Save in very settled conditions they will not venture far from the shore. Occasionally, however, tempests break over the lake, in which a boat could hardly live. Only twice in over 5 years the present writer witnessed such a hurricane. Once it burst from the South. In a few moments the air was thick with mist, through which one could hear the roar of the tortured waters. In about ten minutes the wind fell as suddenly as it had risen. The air cleared, and the wide welter of foam-crested waves attested the fury of the blast. On the second occasion the wind blew from the East, and the phenomena described above were practically repeated.

4. Fish:

The sea contains many varieties of fish in great numbers. The fishing industry was evidently pursued to profit in the days of Christ. Zebedee was able to hire men to assist him (Mark 1:20). In recent years there has been a considerable revival of this industry. See FISHING. Four of the apostles, and these the chief, had been brought up as fishermen on the Sea of Galilee. Peter and Andrew, James and John.

The towns around the lake named in Scripture are treated in separate articles. Some of these it is impossible to identify. Many are the ruins of great and splendid cities on slope and height of which almost nothing is known today. But from their mute testimony we gather that the lake in the valley which is now so quiet was once the center of a busy and prosperous population. We may assume that the cities named in the Gospels were mainly Jewish. Jesus would naturally avoid those in which Greek influences were strong. In most cases they have gone, leaving not even their names with any certainty behind; but His memory abides forever. The lake and mountains are, in main outline, such as His eyes beheld. This it is that lends its highest charm to "the eye of Galilee."

The advent of the railway has stirred afresh the pulses of life in the valley. A steamer plies on the sea between the station at Semakh and Tiberias. Superior buildings are rising outside the ancient walls. Gardens and orchards are being planted. Modern methods of agriculture are being employed in the Jewish colonies, which are rapidly increasing in number. Slowly, perhaps, but surely, the old order is giving place to the new. If freedom and security be enjoyed in reasonable measure, the region will again display its long-hidden treasures of fertility and beauty.

W. Ewing

JUDAS OF GALILEE

(ho Galilaios): Mentioned in Acts 5:37 as the leader of an insurrection occasioned by the census of Quirinius in 7 A.D. (see QUIRINIUS). He, and those who obeyed him, it is said, perished in that revolt. Josephus also repeatedly mentions Judas by this same name, "the Galilean," and speaks of his revolt (Ant., XVIII, i, 6; XX, v, 2; BJ, II, viii, 1; xviii, 8; VII, viii, 1), but in Ant, XVIII, i, names him a Gaulonite, of the city of Gamala. As Gamala was in Gaulonitis, not far from the eastern shore of the Sea of Galilee, it may be regarded as belonging to that province. The party of Judas seems to have been identified with the Zealots.

James Oar

KADESH IN GALILEE

See KEDESH, 3.

SEA OF GALILEE

See GALILEE, SEA OF.

Greek
1056. Galilaia -- Galilee, the northern region of Palestine, also ...
... Galilee, the northern region of Palestine, also the name of a sea. Part of Speech:
Noun, Feminine Transliteration: Galilaia Phonetic Spelling: (gal-il-ah'-yah ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/1056.htm - 6k

5085. Tiberias -- Tiberias, a city of Galilee, also another name ...
... Tiberias, a city of Galilee, also another name for the Sea of Galilee. Part of Speech:
Noun, Feminine Transliteration: Tiberias Phonetic Spelling: (tib-er-ee-as ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/5085.htm - 6k

966. Bethsaida -- "house of fish," Bethsaida, the name of two ...
... 965, 966. Bethsaida. 967 . "house of fish," Bethsaida, the name of two
cities on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. Part of Speech ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/966.htm - 6k

3478. Nazara -- Nazareth, a city in Galilee
... Nazareth, a city in Galilee. Part of Speech: Proper Noun, Indeclinable Transliteration:
Nazara or Nazaret or Nazareth Phonetic Spelling: (nad-zar-eth') Short ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/3478.htm - 6k

2580. Kana -- Cana, a city in Galilee
... Cana, a city in Galilee. Part of Speech: Proper Noun, Indeclinable Transliteration:
Kana Phonetic Spelling: (kan-ah') Short Definition: Cana Definition: Cana, a ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/2580.htm - 6k

5523. Chorazin -- Chorazin, a city of Galilee
... Chorazin, a city of Galilee. Part of Speech: Proper Noun, Indeclinable Transliteration:
Chorazin Phonetic Spelling: (khor-ad-zin') Short Definition: Chorazin ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/5523.htm - 6k

3484. Nain -- Nain, a village of Galilee
... Nain, a village of Galilee. Part of Speech: Proper Noun, Indeclinable Transliteration:
Nain Phonetic Spelling: (nah-in') Short Definition: Nain Definition: Nain ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/3484.htm - 6k

1148. Dalmanoutha -- Dalmanutha, an unidentified place near the ...
... Dalmanutha, an unidentified place near the Sea of Galilee. Part of Speech: Proper
Noun, Indeclinable Transliteration: Dalmanoutha Phonetic Spelling: (dal-man-oo ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/1148.htm - 6k

3093. Magadan -- Magadan, an unidentified place near the Sea of ...
... Magadan, an unidentified place near the Sea of Galilee. Part of Speech: Proper Noun,
Indeclinable Transliteration: Magadan Phonetic Spelling: (mag-dal-ah ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/3093.htm - 6k

1082. Gennesaret -- Gennesaret, a fertile plain on W. shore of the ...
... Gennesaret, a fertile plain on W. shore of the Sea of Galilee. Part of Speech: Proper
Noun, Indeclinable Transliteration: Gennesaret Phonetic Spelling: (ghen-nay ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/1082.htm - 6k

Strong's Hebrew
8396. Tabor -- a mountain Southwest of the Sea of Galilee, also ...
... 8395, 8396. Tabor. 8397 . a mountain Southwest of the Sea of Galilee,
also several other places in Isr. Transliteration: Tabor ...
/hebrew/8396.htm - 6k

4792. Merom -- a place in Upper Galilee
... 4791, 4792. Merom. 4793 . a place in Upper Galilee. Transliteration: Merom
Phonetic Spelling: (may-rome') Short Definition: Merom. ...
/hebrew/4792.htm - 6k

6160. arabah -- a steppe or desert plain, also a desert valley ...
... 6159, 6160. arabah. 6161 . a steppe or desert plain, also a desert valley
running S. from the Sea of Galilee. Transliteration: arabah ...
/hebrew/6160.htm - 6k

3521. Kabul -- a city in Asher, also a region in Galilee
... 3520, 3521. Kabul. 3522 . a city in Asher, also a region in Galilee.
Transliteration: Kabul Phonetic Spelling: (kaw-bool') Short Definition: Cabul. ...
/hebrew/3521.htm - 6k

3672. Kinaroth -- a city in Galilee, also a lake near the city
... a city in Galilee, also a lake near the city. Transliteration: Kinaroth or Kinnereth
Phonetic Spelling: (kin-ner-oth') Short Definition: Chinnereth. ...
/hebrew/3672.htm - 6k

1551. galil -- a cylinder, rod, circuit, district, also a district ...
... a cylinder, rod, circuit, district, also a district in Palestine. Transliteration:
galil Phonetic Spelling: (gaw-leel') Short Definition: Galilee. ... Galilee. ...
/hebrew/1551.htm - 6k

1552. gelilah -- a circuit, boundary, territory, also a district ...
... Word Origin from galal Definition a circuit, boundary, territory, also a district
in Pal. NASB Word Usage Galilee (1), region (3), regions (2). ...
/hebrew/1552.htm - 6k

Library

In Galilee.
... Chapter XXI. In Galilee. ... ntc3306. Map of Sea of Galilee (John 21:1). 1. After these
things Jesus showed himself again to his disciples at the sea of Tiberias. ...
/.../johnson/the new testament commentary vol iii john/in galilee.htm

Galilee
... A Chorographical Century. Chapters 51-60 Chapter 59 Galilee. "There is
Galilee the upper, and Galilee the nether, and the valley. ...
/.../lightfoot/from the talmud and hebraica/chapter 59 galilee.htm

In Galilee at the Time of Our Lord
... Chapter 3 In Galilee at the time of our Lord. "If any one wishes to be rich,
let him go north; if he wants to be wise, let him come ...
/.../edersheim/sketches of jewish social life/chapter 3 in galilee at.htm

The Crisis in Galilee.
... XV THE CRISIS IN GALILEE. "Many therefore of His disciples, when they
heard this, said, This is a hard saying; who can hear it? ...
/.../the expositors bible the gospel of st john vol i/xv the crisis in galilee.htm

The Second Sign in Galilee.
... XI. THE SECOND SIGN IN GALILEE. "In the mean while the disciples prayed Him, saying,
Rabbi, eat. ... And after the two days He went forth from thence into Galilee. ...
/.../dods/the expositors bible the gospel of st john vol i/xi the second sign in.htm

By the Sea of Galilee - the Final Call of the First Disciples, and ...
... CHAPTER XIII. BY THE SEA OF GALILEE - THE FINAL CALL OF THE FIRST DISCIPLES, AND
THE MIRACULOUS DRAUGHT OF FISHES. (Matthew 4:18-22; Mark 1:16-20; Luke 5:1-11.) ...
/.../edersheim/the life and times of jesus the messiah/chapter xiii by the sea.htm

A Description Op Galilee, Samaria, and Judea.
... CHAPTER 3. A Description Op Galilee, Samaria, And Judea. 1. Now Phoenicia
and Syria encompass about the Galilees, which are two, and ...
/.../chapter 3 a description op.htm

Appearance at Sea of Galilee.
... XXIV. APPEARANCE AT SEA OF GALILEE. ... When the disciples had spent the Passover week
at Jerusalem, they naturally returned to their homes in Galilee. ...
/.../the expositors bible the gospel of st john vol ii/xxiv appearance at sea of.htm

The Crisis in Galilee
... The DESIRE of AGES Chapter 41 The Crisis in Galilee. [This chapter is based
on John 6:22-71.] When Christ forbade the people to declare ...
//christianbookshelf.org/white/the desire of ages/chapter 41 the crisis in.htm

Christ Appears in Galilee for the Last Time. --The Commission of ...
... CHAPTER VIII. THE RESURRECTION Section 304. Christ appears in Galilee
for the last Time."The Commission of the Apostles. In his ...
/.../section 304 christ appears in.htm

Thesaurus
Galilee (73 Occurrences)
... It continued long to be occupied by the original inhabitants, and hence came to
be called "Galilee of the Gentiles" (Matthew 4:15), and also "Upper Galilee...
/g/galilee.htm - 67k

Cana (4 Occurrences)
... Easton's Bible Dictionary Reedy, a town of Galilee, near Capernaum. ... It is called
"Cana of Galilee," to distinguish it from Cana of Asher (Joshua 19:28). Int. ...
/c/cana.htm - 11k

Judea (50 Occurrences)
... The province of Judea, as distinguished from Galilee and Samaria, included the
territories of the tribes of Judah, Benjamin, Dan, Simeon, and part of Ephraim. ...
/j/judea.htm - 22k

Kedesh (12 Occurrences)
... It has been supposed by some that the Kedesh of the narrative, where Barak assembled
his troops, was not the place in Upper Galilee so named, which was 30 ...
/k/kedesh.htm - 14k

Throughout (291 Occurrences)
... Matthew 4:23 Then Jesus travelled through all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues
and proclaiming the Good News of the Kingdom, and curing every kind of ...
/t/throughout.htm - 37k

Bethsaida (7 Occurrences)
... (1.) A town in Galilee, on the west side ... (2) Bethsaida of Galilee, where dwelt Philip,
Andrew, Peter (John 1:44; John 12:21), and perhaps also James and John. ...
/b/bethsaida.htm - 19k

Region (96 Occurrences)
... he was afraid to go there. Being warned in a dream, he withdrew into the
region of Galilee, (WEB NAS). Matthew 3:5 Then people from ...
/r/region.htm - 34k

Golan (4 Occurrences)
... Exile, a city of Bashan (Deuteronomy 4:43), one of the three cities of refuge east
of Jordan, about 12 miles north-east of the Sea of Galilee (Joshua 20:8 ...
/g/golan.htm - 11k

Judaea (45 Occurrences)
... the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither: notwithstanding, being
warned of God in a dream, he turned aside into the parts of Galilee: (KJV WEY ...
/j/judaea.htm - 24k

Across (172 Occurrences)
... Across (172 Occurrences). Matthew 4:15 "The land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali,
toward the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles, (See RSV). ...
/a/across.htm - 35k

Concordance
Galilee (73 Occurrences)

Matthew 2:22
But when he heard that Archelaus was reigning over Judea in the place of his father, Herod, he was afraid to go there. Being warned in a dream, he withdrew into the region of Galilee,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 3:13
Then Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to John, to be baptized by him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 4:12
Now when Jesus heard that John was delivered up, he withdrew into Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 4:15
"The land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, toward the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 4:18
Walking by the sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers: Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew, his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 4:23
Jesus went about in all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, preaching the Good News of the Kingdom, and healing every disease and every sickness among the people.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 4:25
Great multitudes from Galilee, Decapolis, Jerusalem, Judea and from beyond the Jordan followed him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 11:1
It happened that when Jesus had finished directing his twelve disciples, he departed from there to teach and preach in their cities.
(See NIV)

Matthew 15:29
Jesus departed there, and came near to the sea of Galilee; and he went up into the mountain, and sat there.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 17:22
While they were staying in Galilee, Jesus said to them, "The Son of Man is about to be delivered up into the hands of men,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 19:1
It happened when Jesus had finished these words, he departed from Galilee, and came into the borders of Judea beyond the Jordan.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 21:11
The multitudes said, "This is the prophet, Jesus, from Nazareth of Galilee."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 26:32
But after I am raised up, I will go before you into Galilee."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 26:69
Now Peter sat without in the palace: and a damsel came unto him, saying, Thou also wast with Jesus of Galilee.
(KJV WBS YLT NIV)

Matthew 27:55
Many women were there watching from afar, who had followed Jesus from Galilee, serving him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 28:7
Go quickly and tell his disciples,'He has risen from the dead, and behold, he goes before you into Galilee; there you will see him.' Behold, I have told you."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 28:10
Then Jesus said to them, "Don't be afraid. Go tell my brothers that they should go into Galilee, and there they will see me."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 28:16
But the eleven disciples went into Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had sent them.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 1:9
It happened in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized by John in the Jordan.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 1:14
Now after John was taken into custody, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the Good News of the Kingdom of God,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 1:16
Passing along by the sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net into the sea, for they were fishermen.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 1:28
The report of him went out immediately everywhere into all the region of Galilee and its surrounding area.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 1:39
He went into their synagogues throughout all Galilee, preaching and casting out demons.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 3:7
Jesus withdrew to the sea with his disciples, and a great multitude followed him from Galilee, from Judea,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:21
Then a convenient day came, that Herod on his birthday made a supper for his nobles, the high officers, and the chief men of Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 7:31
Again he departed from the borders of Tyre and Sidon, and came to the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the region of Decapolis.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 9:30
They went out from there, and passed through Galilee. He didn't want anyone to know it.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 14:28
However, after I am raised up, I will go before you into Galilee."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 15:41
who, when he was in Galilee, followed him, and served him; and many other women who came up with him to Jerusalem.
(WEB KJV ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 16:7
But go, tell his disciples and Peter,'He goes before you into Galilee. There you will see him, as he said to you.'"
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 1:26
Now in the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was sent from God to a city of Galilee, named Nazareth,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 2:4
Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and family of David;
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 2:39
When they had accomplished all things that were according to the law of the Lord, they returned into Galilee, to their own city, Nazareth.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 3:1
Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilene,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 4:14
Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee, and news about him spread through all the surrounding area.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 4:31
He came down to Capernaum, a city of Galilee. He was teaching them on the Sabbath day,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 4:44
He was preaching in the synagogues of Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT)

Luke 5:17
It happened on one of those days, that he was teaching; and there were Pharisees and teachers of the law sitting by, who had come out of every village of Galilee, Judea, and Jerusalem. The power of the Lord was with him to heal them.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 8:26
They arrived at the country of the Gadarenes, which is opposite Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 17:11
It happened as he was on his way to Jerusalem, that he was passing along the borders of Samaria and Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:5
But they insisted, saying, "He stirs up the people, teaching throughout all Judea, beginning from Galilee even to this place."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:6
But when Pilate heard Galilee mentioned, he asked if the man was a Galilean.
(WEB KJV DBY WBS YLT)

Luke 23:49
All his acquaintances, and the women who followed with him from Galilee, stood at a distance, watching these things.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:55
The women, who had come with him out of Galilee, followed after, and saw the tomb, and how his body was laid.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 24:6
He isn't here, but is risen. Remember what he told you when he was still in Galilee,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 1:43
On the next day, he was determined to go out into Galilee, and he found Philip. Jesus said to him, "Follow me."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 2:1
The third day, there was a marriage in Cana of Galilee. Jesus' mother was there.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 2:11
This beginning of his signs Jesus did in Cana of Galilee, and revealed his glory; and his disciples believed in him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 4:3
he left Judea, and departed into Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 4:43
After the two days he went out from there and went into Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 4:45
So when he came into Galilee, the Galileans received him, having seen all the things that he did in Jerusalem at the feast, for they also went to the feast.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 4:46
Jesus came therefore again to Cana of Galilee, where he made the water into wine. There was a certain nobleman whose son was sick at Capernaum.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 4:47
When he heard that Jesus had come out of Judea into Galilee, he went to him, and begged him that he would come down and heal his son, for he was at the point of death.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 4:54
This is again the second sign that Jesus did, having come out of Judea into Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 6:1
After these things, Jesus went away to the other side of the sea of Galilee, which is also called the Sea of Tiberias.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 7:1
After these things, Jesus was walking in Galilee, for he wouldn't walk in Judea, because the Jews sought to kill him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 7:9
Having said these things to them, he stayed in Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 7:41
Others said, "This is the Christ." But some said, "What, does the Christ come out of Galilee?
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 7:52
They answered him, "Are you also from Galilee? Search, and see that no prophet has arisen out of Galilee. "
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 12:21
These, therefore, came to Philip, who was from Bethsaida of Galilee, and asked him, saying, "Sir, we want to see Jesus."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

John 21:2
Simon Peter, Thomas called Didymus, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, and the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples were together.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 1:11
who also said, "You men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into the sky? This Jesus, who was received up from you into the sky will come back in the same way as you saw him going into the sky."
(WEB KJV ASV BBE DBY WBS NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 5:37
After this man, Judas of Galilee rose up in the days of the enrollment, and drew away some people after him. He also perished, and all, as many as obeyed him, were scattered abroad.
(WEB KJV ASV BBE WBS NAS)

Acts 9:31
So the assemblies throughout all Judea and Galilee and Samaria had peace, and were built up. They were multiplied, walking in the fear of the Lord and in the comfort of the Holy Spirit.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 10:37
that spoken word you yourselves know, which was proclaimed throughout all Judea, beginning from Galilee, after the baptism which John preached;
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 13:31
and he was seen for many days by those who came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses to the people.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Joshua 12:23
the king of Dor in the region of Dor, one; the king of Goiim in the Gilgal, one;
(See RSV)

Joshua 20:7
They set apart Kedesh in Galilee in the hill country of Naphtali, Shechem in the hill country of Ephraim, and Kiriath Arba (the same is Hebron) in the hill country of Judah.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Joshua 21:32
Out of the tribe of Naphtali, Kedesh in Galilee with its suburbs, the city of refuge for the manslayer, Hammothdor with its suburbs, and Kartan with its suburbs; three cities.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Kings 9:11
(now Hiram the king of Tyre had furnished Solomon with cedar trees and fir trees, and with gold, according to all his desire), that then king Solomon gave Hiram twenty cities in the land of Galilee.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

2 Kings 15:29
In the days of Pekah king of Israel came Tiglath Pileser king of Assyria, and took Ijon, and Abel Beth Maacah, and Janoah, and Kedesh, and Hazor, and Gilead, and Galilee, all the land of Naphtali; and he carried them captive to Assyria.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Chronicles 6:76
and out of the tribe of Naphtali, Kedesh in Galilee with its suburbs, and Hammon with its suburbs, and Kiriathaim with its suburbs.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Isaiah 9:1
But there shall be no more gloom for her who was in anguish. In the former time, he brought into contempt the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali; but in the latter time he has made it glorious, by the way of the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the nations.
(WEB KJV ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Subtopics

Galilee

Galilee: Christ: Appeared In, to his Disciples After his Resurrection

Galilee: Christ: Brought up In

Galilee: Christ: Chose his Apostles From

Galilee: Christ: Commenced, and Wrought Many Miracles In

Galilee: Christ: Despised As of

Galilee: Christ: Followed by the People of

Galilee: Christ: Kindly Received In

Galilee: Christ: Ministered to by Women of

Galilee: Christ: Preached Throughout

Galilee: Christ: Preaching In, Predicted

Galilee: Christ: Sought Refuge In

Galilee: Christian Churches Established In

Galilee: Conquered by the Assyrians

Galilee: Conquered by the Syrians

Galilee: Inhabitants of Called Galilaeans

Galilee: Inhabitants of Cruelly Treated by Pilate

Galilee: Inhabitants of Despised by the Jews

Galilee: Inhabitants of Opposed the Roman Taxation

Galilee: Inhabitants of Used a Peculiar Dialect

Galilee: Jurisdiction of, Granted to Herod by the Romans

Galilee: Kadesh the City of Refuge For

Galilee: Lake of Gennesaret, Called the Sea of

Galilee: Modern Towns of Accho or Ptolemais

Galilee: Modern Towns of Bethsaida

Galilee: Modern Towns of Caesarea

Galilee: Modern Towns of Caesarea Philippi

Galilee: Modern Towns of Cana

Galilee: Modern Towns of Capernaum

Galilee: Modern Towns of Chorazin

Galilee: Modern Towns of Nain

Galilee: Modern Towns of Nazareth

Galilee: Modern Towns of Tiberias

Galilee: Sea (Lake) of Galilee: Called Lake of Gennesaret

Galilee: Sea (Lake) of Galilee: Called Sea of Chinnereth

Galilee: Sea (Lake) of Galilee: Called Sea of Chinneroth

Galilee: Sea (Lake) of Galilee: Called Sea of Tiberias

Galilee: Sea (Lake) of Galilee: Jesus Calls Disciples on the Shore of

Galilee: Sea (Lake) of Galilee: Jesus Teaches from a Ship On

Galilee: Sea (Lake) of Galilee: Miracles of Jesus On

Galilee: Separated from Judea by Samaria

Galilee: Supplied Tyre With Provisions

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: A City of Refuge In

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Called Galilee of the Nations

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Called Gennesaret

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Cities In, Given to Hiram

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Congregations In

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Dialect of

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Disciples Were Chiefly From

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Herod (Antipas), Tetrarch of

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Jesus Appeared to his Disciples In, After his Resurrection

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Jesus Resides In

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: People of, Receive Jesus

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Prophecy Concerning

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Routes From, to Judaea

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Taken by King of Assyria

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Teaching and Miracles of Jesus In

Galilee: The Northern District of Palestine: Women From, Ministered to Jesus

Galilee: Twenty Cities of, Given to Hiram

Galilee: Upper Part of, Called Galilee of the Gentiles

Related Terms

Cana (4 Occurrences)

Judea (50 Occurrences)

Kedesh (12 Occurrences)

Throughout (291 Occurrences)

Bethsaida (7 Occurrences)

Region (96 Occurrences)

Golan (4 Occurrences)

Judaea (45 Occurrences)

Across (172 Occurrences)

Nazareth (29 Occurrences)

Lake (45 Occurrences)

Tiberias (3 Occurrences)

Gennesaret (3 Occurrences)

Galilean (5 Occurrences)

Shore (45 Occurrences)

Andrew (12 Occurrences)

Zebulun (46 Occurrences)

Gaulonitis

Withdrew (55 Occurrences)

Passing (177 Occurrences)

Naph'tali (47 Occurrences)

Ahead (98 Occurrences)

Returned (328 Occurrences)

Departed (270 Occurrences)

News (453 Occurrences)

Followed (201 Occurrences)

Joanna (3 Occurrences)

Genneseret

Waiting (274 Occurrences)

Walked (178 Occurrences)

Decapolis (3 Occurrences)

Departing (20 Occurrences)

Merom (2 Occurrences)

Performed (110 Occurrences)

Borders (104 Occurrences)

Casting (54 Occurrences)

Arbela

Synagogues (27 Occurrences)

Delivered (427 Occurrences)

Beyond (209 Occurrences)

Along (500 Occurrences)

District (59 Occurrences)

Thence (152 Occurrences)

Passed (329 Occurrences)

Walking (189 Occurrences)

Risen (169 Occurrences)

Preached (75 Occurrences)

Women (328 Occurrences)

Nathanael (6 Occurrences)

Naphtali (51 Occurrences)

Raised (267 Occurrences)

Flavius

Josephus

Transfiguration

Spread (257 Occurrences)

Hazor (19 Occurrences)

Mountain (298 Occurrences)

Wish (141 Occurrences)

Olives (30 Occurrences)

Beginning (187 Occurrences)

Jordan (188 Occurrences)

Town (861 Occurrences)

Tabor (12 Occurrences)

Pekah (11 Occurrences)

Named (428 Occurrences)

Fish (66 Occurrences)

Follow (267 Occurrences)

Philip (37 Occurrences)

Quickly (254 Occurrences)

Quit (12 Occurrences)

Zebedee (11 Occurrences)

Needs (85 Occurrences)

Nahum (3 Occurrences)

Net (91 Occurrences)

Unwilling (30 Occurrences)

Opportunity (35 Occurrences)

Jewry (3 Occurrences)

Jabbok (7 Occurrences)

Length (135 Occurrences)

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