John 2:12
New International Version
After this he went down to Capernaum with his mother and brothers and his disciples. There they stayed for a few days.

New Living Translation
After the wedding he went to Capernaum for a few days with his mother, his brothers, and his disciples.

English Standard Version
After this he went down to Capernaum, with his mother and his brothers and his disciples, and they stayed there for a few days.

Berean Study Bible
After this, He went down to Capernaum with His mother and brothers and His disciples, and they stayed there a few days.

Berean Literal Bible
After this, He went down to Capernaum, He and His mother, and His brothers, and His disciples, and they stayed there not many days.

King James Bible
After this he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, and his brethren, and his disciples: and they continued there not many days.

New King James Version
After this He went down to Capernaum, He, His mother, His brothers, and His disciples; and they did not stay there many days.

New American Standard Bible
After this He went down to Capernaum, He and His mother, and His brothers and His disciples; and they stayed there a few days.

NASB 1995
After this He went down to Capernaum, He and His mother and His brothers and His disciples; and they stayed there a few days.

NASB 1977
After this He went down to Capernaum, He and His mother, and His brothers, and His disciples; and there they stayed a few days.

Amplified Bible
After this He went down to Capernaum, He and His mother and brothers and His disciples; and they stayed there a few days.

Christian Standard Bible
After this, he went down to Capernaum, together with his mother, his brothers, and his disciples, and they stayed there only a few days.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
After this, He went down to Capernaum, together with His mother, His brothers, and His disciples, and they stayed there only a few days.

American Standard Version
After this he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, and his brethren, and his disciples; and there they abode not many days.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
After this he went down to Capernaum, he, his mother, his brothers and his disciples, and they were there a few days.

Contemporary English Version
After this, he went with his mother, his brothers, and his disciples to the town of Capernaum, where they stayed for a few days.

Douay-Rheims Bible
After this he went down to Capharnaum, he and his mother, and his brethren, and his disciples: and they remained there not many days.

English Revised Version
After this he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, and his brethren, and his disciples: and there they abode not many days.

Good News Translation
After this, Jesus and his mother, brothers, and disciples went to Capernaum and stayed there a few days.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
After this, Jesus, his mother, brothers, and disciples went to the city of Capernaum and stayed there for a few days.

International Standard Version
After this, Jesus went down to Capernaum—he, his mother, his brothers, and his disciples—and they remained there for a few days.

Literal Standard Version
after this He went down to Capernaum, He, and His mother, and His brothers, and His disciples; and they did not remain there many days.

NET Bible
After this he went down to Capernaum with his mother and brothers and his disciples, and they stayed there a few days.

New Heart English Bible
After this, he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, his brothers, and his disciples; and they stayed there a few days.

Weymouth New Testament
Afterwards He went down to Capernaum--He, and His mother, and His brothers, and His disciples; and they made a short stay there.

World English Bible
After this, he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, his brothers, and his disciples; and they stayed there a few days.

Young's Literal Translation
after this he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, and his brethren, and his disciples; and there they remained not many days.

Additional Translations ...
Context
Jesus Cleanses the Temple
11Jesus performed this, the first of His signs, at Cana in Galilee. He thus revealed His glory, and His disciples believed in Him. 12After this, He went down to Capernaum with His mother and brothers and His disciples, and they stayed there a few days. 13When the Jewish Passover was near, Jesus went up to Jerusalem.…

Cross References
Matthew 4:13
Leaving Nazareth, He went and lived in Capernaum, which is by the sea in the region of Zebulun and Naphtali,

Matthew 12:46
While Jesus was still speaking to the crowds, His mother and brothers stood outside, wanting to speak to Him.

John 2:2
and Jesus and His disciples had also been invited to the wedding.

John 4:46
So once again He came to Cana in Galilee, where He had turned the water into wine. And there was a royal official whose son lay sick at Capernaum.


Treasury of Scripture

After this he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, and his brothers, and his disciples: and they continued there not many days.

Capernaum.

John 6:17
And entered into a ship, and went over the sea toward Capernaum. And it was now dark, and Jesus was not come to them.

Matthew 4:13
And leaving Nazareth, he came and dwelt in Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast, in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim:

Matthew 11:23
And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.

and his brethren.

John 7:3-5
His brethren therefore said unto him, Depart hence, and go into Judaea, that thy disciples also may see the works that thou doest…

Matthew 12:46
While he yet talked to the people, behold, his mother and his brethren stood without, desiring to speak with him.

Matthew 13:55,56
Is not this the carpenter's son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas? …









(12) After this he went down to Capernaum.--For the position of Capernaum comp. Note on Matthew 4:13. It was on the shore of the lake of Tiberias, and He must have gone "down" to it from any locality among the hills of Galilee. The words do not imply that they went to Capernaum direct from Cana. The "after this" allows of a return to Nazareth, and the mention of the "brethren" makes such a return probable. The place of this sojourn in the order of events belongs to the narrative of the earlier Gospels, and here, as elsewhere, questions which recur are treated when they are first mentioned. To deal with them on each occurrence would be to save the trouble of reference at the cost of much space; and this would be ill-saved; the spiritual profit arising from constant reference is one which no earnest student of the Gospels could desire to lose. He will wish to study every event in that life in every word which records it. (Comp. Matthew 4:13 et seq., and Matthew 9:1; Mark 3:21-31; Mark 6:3; Luke 4:16-30). For the "brethren of the Lord," see Note on Matthew 13:55. . . . Verse 12. - After this he went down - from the high lands of Galilee to the borders of the Sea of Galilee, depressed as we now know it to be below the level of the Mediterranean - to Capernaum. Three competing sites for this small town have been advocated by Eastern travellers; all of them on the shore of the lake, all near to Bethsaida and Chorazin, in "the way of the sea," combining more or less the characteristics required by the New Testament narrative and the references in Josephus ('Bell. Jud.,' 3:10, 8). Keim is in favour of Khan, Minyeh; but there is no abundant spring such as Josephus describes, nor are there any ruins which indicate an extensive town. Caspari has argued in favour of Ain Mudawarah, a mile and a half to the west of Khan Minyeh, in which, though water is abundant, there are no remains of buildings. The old travellers, and the most recent explorations, have coincided in fixing on Tell-Hum as the site; and Dr. Farrar, Dr. Westcott, Major Wilson, incline to this conclusion. Abundant ruins are found there, and, what is more than probable, the remains of the very synagogue built by the Roman centurion, and one certainly dating back to the Herodian age. Tell-Hum, or "the Mound of Hum," is an easy corruption of the Caphar, or village of Nahum. He, and his mother, and his brethren, and his disciples. They may have returned home to Nazareth, though some recent commentators suggest that Cana had become the home of his family in late years. This is contradicted by the express statement of ch. 1:45, and the utter obliteration of the name of Cana from the synoptic narrative. We cannot identify this possible return to Nazareth with the account in Luke 4:16-20, because it assumes a previous period of activity in Capernaum, and further, because the commencement of Christ's public ministry is expressly made synchronous with the imprisonment of the Baptist (Matthew 4:12-15), which did not take place till weeks or months afterwards (John 3:24). Consequently, this journey to Capernaum preceded the journey to Jerusalem and the return to Nazareth, of which Matthew speaks. The fact that "the mother and brethren "of Jesus accompanied him, but not "the sisters," suggests what is implied in Mark 6:3 that the sisters were married in Nazareth and in Mark 3:21-23 that they did not accompany the non-believing brothers in their endeavour "to lay hold of him." The fact that Joseph is not mentioned induces the common assumption that he was already dead. Volumes have been written on "the brethren of Jesus." The determination of their parentage is one of the most perplexing points in the evangelic history. There are three hypotheses, which are alike beset with difficulties.

(1) The view propounded by Helvidius in Rome, in the fourth century, and to which Jerome replied, that the "brothers" are brothers in the ordinary sense, children of Joseph and Mary. This supposition is sustained by the statement of Matthew 1:25 and Luke 2:7, each of which implies that the mother of our Lord had other children. The sentiment of the Church in favour of Mary's perpetual virginity, and in favour of the uniqueness of her maternity, has powerfully contested this supposition. Further, apart from any sentiment, it has been said that the Lord would not have commended the mother to the beloved disciple, if he had living brothers who had a previous claim. To this, however, it is replied that John, the son of Zebedee and Salome, may have been his near relative, if Salome were the sister of the Virgin; and also that, up to the time of the Ascension, there is no proof that the brethren believed in him, but the contrary. The effect of a special manifestation to James (1 Corinthians 15.) may have led to a general admission of the brethren, who are distinguished from, but yet with, the eleven apostles and the mother on the eve of the Ascension (Acts 1:14).

(2) To obviate the difficulties of a sentimental kind, it was suggested by Jerome, and it has been often assumed since, that these brothers were in reality first cousins, not the children of Salome the sister of the Virgin, but of Mary the wife of Cleophas, who is supposed to be the sister of Mary the mother of Jesus (see ch. 20:25, note), and further that this Cleophas = Clopas = חַלְפִי = Alphaeus = Chalphai for the Aramaic guttural might be omitted as in Alphseus, or turned into κ or χ in Clopas, found in John's text. Jerome, however (Lightfoot), never referred to this confirmation of his theory; but it has been hence conjectured that James the son of Alphaeus was identical with the celebrated "James the brother of our Lord," mentioned in Acts 12:17; Acts 15:13; Acts 21:18; in Galatians 1:19; Galatians 2:9, 12; and in ecclesiastical history. If, however, this James were the "son of Alphaeus," then Judas (John 14:22) (not Iscariot) - "Judas of James" (Jude 1:1; Acts 1:13) - was also one of the "brethren;" also Joses and Simon, sons of Cleophas, were of their number; and some have gone further, and made Simon the Canaanite the other brother. This might possibly be the solution of the puzzle, if the entire theory did not break down under the clear distinction drawn in evangelic narrative between the twelve apostles and the brethren. E.g. in this passage they are discriminated from "disciples." In John 7:5 the "brethren" are said not to believe on the Lord. In Acts 1:14 they are mentioned in addition to the apostles. Though in Galatians 1 and 2, James might seem from his great eminence to be classed with apostles in some wider sense, yet in Acts 15:13; Acts 21:18; Galatians 2:12 he seems to take precedence of all the apostles, at the Council of Jerusalem, and in presidency of the Church there. Moreover, the identification of Cleophas with Alphaeus is very doubtful. Clopas is Aramaic, Cleophas a Greek name; and the identification of his wife Mary with the sister of the Virgin is also very doubtful; while to have two sisters of the same name in the same family is highly improbable. We cannot believe, further, that so distinguished a man as James the brother of our Lord could have been designated as "James the Less" in the evangelic narrative (Mark 15:40). If the "cousin theory" holds, this must have been the case. Finally, "cousins" would hardly so persistently have been spoken of as brothers, and this would be still less likely if their mother was living.

(3) The third hypothesis, which is the suggestion of Epiphanius, is that these brothers were the children of Joseph by a previous marriage, to whom the blessed Virgin had acted the part of mother. This is based on a legend of the apocryphal 'Protevang. of James' (ch. 9. and 17.), where Joseph speaks of his "sons." The theory saves the virginity of Mary, but sacrifices that of Joseph. Such a conclusion, in some ecclesiastic circles, is almost as unwelcome as the former. Against Jerome's hypothesis the greatest number of difficulties present themselves, and it must be abandoned. Therefore the choice really lies between that of Helvidius . . .

Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek
After
Μετὰ (Meta)
Preposition
Strong's 3326: (a) gen: with, in company with, (b) acc: (1) behind, beyond, after, of place, (2) after, of time, with nouns, neut. of adjectives.

this,
τοῦτο (touto)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's 3778: This; he, she, it.

He went down
κατέβη (katebē)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 2597: To go down, come down, either from the sky or from higher land, descend. From kata and the base of basis; to descend.

to
εἰς (eis)
Preposition
Strong's 1519: A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.

Capernaum
Καφαρναοὺμ (Kapharnaoum)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's 2584: Capernaum, a town of Galilee. Of Hebrew origin; Capernaum, a place in Palestine.

[with]
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

His
αὐτοῦ (autou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

mother
μήτηρ (mētēr)
Noun - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's 3384: A mother. Apparently a primary word; a 'mother'.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

brothers
ἀδελφοὶ (adelphoi)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

His
αὐτοῦ (autou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

disciples,
μαθηταὶ (mathētai)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's 3101: A learner, disciple, pupil. From manthano; a learner, i.e. Pupil.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

they stayed
ἔμειναν (emeinan)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's 3306: To remain, abide, stay, wait; with acc: I wait for, await. A primary verb; to stay.

there
ἐκεῖ (ekei)
Adverb
Strong's 1563: (a) there, yonder, in that place, (b) thither, there. Of uncertain affinity; there; by extension, thither.

a few
πολλὰς (pollas)
Adjective - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's 4183: Much, many; often.

days.
ἡμέρας (hēmeras)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's 2250: A day, the period from sunrise to sunset.


Jump to Previous
Abode Afterwards Capernaum Caper'na-Um Continued Descended Disciples Few Mother Short Three
Jump to Next
Abode Afterwards Capernaum Caper'na-Um Continued Descended Disciples Few Mother Short Three
Links
John 2:12 NIV
John 2:12 NLT
John 2:12 ESV
John 2:12 NASB
John 2:12 KJV

John 2:12 BibleApps.com
John 2:12 Biblia Paralela
John 2:12 Chinese Bible
John 2:12 French Bible
John 2:12 Clyx Quotations

NT Gospels: John 2:12 After this he went down to Capernaum (Jhn Jo Jn)
John 2:11
Top of Page
Top of Page