1 Corinthians 9:5
New International Version
Don't we have the right to take a believing wife along with us, as do the other apostles and the Lord's brothers and Cephas?

New Living Translation
Don't we have the right to bring a Christian wife with us as the other apostles and the Lord's brothers do, and as Peter does?

English Standard Version
Do we not have the right to take along a believing wife, as do the other apostles and the brothers of the Lord and Cephas?

Berean Study Bible
Have we no right to take along a believing wife, as do the other apostles and the Lord’s brothers and Cephas?

Berean Literal Bible
Have we no authority to take about a believer as a wife, as also the other apostles, and the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?

New American Standard Bible
Do we not have a right to take along a believing wife, even as the rest of the apostles and the brothers of the Lord and Cephas?

King James Bible
Have we not power to lead about a sister, a wife, as well as other apostles, and as the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?

Christian Standard Bible
Don't we have the right to be accompanied by a believing wife like the other apostles, the Lord's brothers, and Cephas?

Contemporary English Version
We each have the right to marry one of the Lord's followers and to take her along with us, just as the other apostles and the Lord's brothers and Peter do.

Good News Translation
Don't I have the right to follow the example of the other apostles and the Lord's brothers and Peter, by taking a Christian wife with me on my trips?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Don't we have the right to be accompanied by a Christian wife like the other apostles, the Lord's brothers, and Cephas?

International Standard Version
We have the right to take a believing wife with us like the other apostles, the Lord's brothers, and Cephas, don't we?

NET Bible
Do we not have the right to the company of a believing wife, like the other apostles and the Lord's brothers and Cephas?

New Heart English Bible
Have we no right to take along a wife who is a believer, even as the rest of the apostles, and the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And why is it illegal for us to travel with a sister-wife as other Apostles and as the brothers of our Lord and as Kaypha?

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Don't we have the right to take our wives along with us like the other apostles, the Lord's brothers, and Cephas do?

New American Standard 1977
Do we not have a right to take along a believing wife, even as the rest of the apostles, and the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?

Jubilee Bible 2000
Do we not have authority to bring with us a sister, a wife, as also the other apostles and as the brothers of the Lord and Cephas?

King James 2000 Bible
Have we not the right to lead about a sister, a wife, as well as other apostles, and as the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?

American King James Version
Have we not power to lead about a sister, a wife, as well as other apostles, and as the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?

American Standard Version
Have we no right to lead about a wife that is a believer, even as the rest of the apostles, and the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Have we not power to carry about a woman, a sister, as well as the rest of the apostles, and the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?

Darby Bible Translation
have we not a right to take round a sister [as] wife, as also the other apostles, and the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?

English Revised Version
Have we no right to lead about a wife that is a believer, even as the rest of the apostles, and the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?

Webster's Bible Translation
Have we not power to lead about a sister, a wife, as well as other apostles, and as the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?

Weymouth New Testament
Have we not a right to take with us on our journeys a Christian sister as our wife, as the rest of the Apostles do--and the Lord's brothers and Peter?

World English Bible
Have we no right to take along a wife who is a believer, even as the rest of the apostles, and the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?

Young's Literal Translation
have we not authority a sister -- a wife -- to lead about, as also the other apostles, and the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?
Study Bible
The Rights of an Apostle
4Have we no right to food and to drink? 5Have we no right to take along a believing wife, as do the other apostles and the Lord’s brothers and Cephas? 6Or are Barnabas and I the only apostles who must work for a living?…
Cross References
Matthew 8:14
When Jesus arrived at Peter's house, He saw Peter's mother-in-law sick in bed with a fever.

Matthew 12:46
While Jesus was still speaking to the crowds, His mother and brothers stood outside, wanting to speak to Him.

John 1:42
Andrew brought him to Jesus, who looked at him and said, "You are Simon son of John. You will be called Cephas" (which is translated as Peter).

1 Corinthians 1:12
What I mean is this: Individuals among you are saying, "I follow Paul," "I follow Apollos," "I follow Cephas," or "I follow Christ."

1 Corinthians 7:7
I wish that all men were as I am. But each man has his own gift from God; one has this gift, another has that.

1 Corinthians 7:8
Now to the unmarried and widows I say this: It is good for them to remain unmarried, as I am.

Treasury of Scripture

Have we not power to lead about a sister, a wife, as well as other apostles, and as the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?

to lead.

1 Timothy 3:2
A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach;

1 Timothy 4:3
Forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats, which God hath created to be received with thanksgiving of them which believe and know the truth.

Titus 1:6
If any be blameless, the husband of one wife, having faithful children not accused of riot or unruly.

a sister.

1 Corinthians 7:15,39
But if the unbelieving depart, let him depart. A brother or a sister is not under bondage in such cases: but God hath called us to peace…

Song of Solomon 4:9,10,12
Thou hast ravished my heart, my sister, my spouse; thou hast ravished my heart with one of thine eyes, with one chain of thy neck…

Song of Solomon 5:1,2
I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved…

wife.

Matthew 12:46-50
While he yet talked to the people, behold, his mother and his brethren stood without, desiring to speak with him…

Matthew 13:55
Is not this the carpenter's son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas?

Mark 6:3
Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? And they were offended at him.

Cephas.

1 Corinthians 1:12
Now this I say, that every one of you saith, I am of Paul; and I of Apollos; and I of Cephas; and I of Christ.

Matthew 8:14
And when Jesus was come into Peter's house, he saw his wife's mother laid, and sick of a fever.

Mark 1:30
But Simon's wife's mother lay sick of a fever, and anon they tell him of her.







Lexicon
Have we
ἔχομεν (echomen)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 2192: To have, hold, possess. Including an alternate form scheo skheh'-o; a primary verb; to hold.

no
μὴ (mē)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3361: Not, lest. A primary particle of qualified negation; not, lest; also (whereas ou expects an affirmative one) whether.

right
ἐξουσίαν (exousian)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1849: From exesti; privilege, i.e. force, capacity, competency, freedom, or mastery, delegated influence.

to take along
περιάγειν (periagein)
Verb - Present Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 4013: To lead or carry about (or around), go about, traverse. From peri and ago; to take around; reflexively, to walk around.

a believing
ἀδελφὴν (adelphēn)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 79: A sister, a woman (fellow-)member of a church, a Christian woman. Fem of adephos; a sister.

wife,
γυναῖκα (gynaika)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1135: A woman, wife, my lady. Probably from the base of ginomai; a woman; specially, a wife.

as
ὡς (hōs)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 5613: Probably adverb of comparative from hos; which how, i.e. In that manner.

[do]
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

the
οἱ (hoi)
Article - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

other
λοιποὶ (loipoi)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3062: Left, left behind, the remainder, the rest, the others. Masculine plural of a derivative of leipo; remaining ones.

apostles
ἀπόστολοι (apostoloi)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 652: From apostello; a delegate; specially, an ambassador of the Gospel; officially a commissioner of Christ.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

the
οἱ (hoi)
Article - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Lord’s
Κυρίου (Kyriou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2962: Lord, master, sir; the Lord. From kuros; supreme in authority, i.e. controller; by implication, Master.

brothers
ἀδελφοὶ (adelphoi)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

Cephas?
Κηφᾶς (Kēphas)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2786: Of Chaldee origin; the Rock; Cephas, a surname of Peter.
(5) To lead about a sister, a wife--i.e., to take with us on our journeys a Christian woman as a wife. Roman divines have interpreted this as referring to "the custom of Christian matrons attending as sisters upon the Apostles." But as the Apostle illustrates his meaning by a reference to Peter, who we know had a wife, such an interpretation is inadmissible. St. Paul, in this verse, carries his statement of apostolic right to support one step further. Not only had he a right to be supported himself, but the support of the married Apostles and their wives by the Church implied the same right on the part of all. A practice which grew out of a misapprehension of the real meaning of this passage, led to grave scandal, and was finally condemned by the first Council of Nicaea (A.D. 325).

The brethren of the Lord, and Cephas.--These are mentioned specially, not as distinct from the Apostles (for Cephas, of course, was one), but as examples which would have great weight with the particular Jewish faction to whom this argument was adduced. James was Bishop of Jerusalem (Acts 15:13; Acts 21:18). The other brethren of our Lord were Joses, Simon, and Judas (Matthew 13:55). They were not of the twelve Apostles, even after their conversion being mentioned as distinct from the Twelve (Acts 1:14), although James subsequently occupied an apostolic position (Galatians 2:9). Various and ingenious suggestions have been made as to who these "brethren of the Lord" were; amongst others, that they were cousins, or that they were children of Joseph by a former marriage. These views grew out of a desire to establish the perpetual virginity of Mary. The natural conclusion from a study of the mention of their names in the Gospels, without preconceived prejudice, would be that Joseph and Mary lived together after the miraculous birth of Christ, and that these were their children. This, too, is supported by the use of the word "first-born" in reference to our Lord (Matthew 1:25; Luke 2:7), and the word "till" (Matthew 1:25), and "before they came together" (Matthew 1:18), and the repeated mention of them as brethren in connection with His mother Mary. (See Note on Matthew 12:46.)

Verse 5. - To lead about a sister, a wife. There can be no doubt that this represents the true reading, and that the meaning is, "We have power to lead about, that is, to travel in company with, some Christian sister to whom we are married, and who is supported at the expense of the Church." This plain meaning, however, involving the assertion that the apostles and desposyni ("the Lord's brethren") were married men, was so distasteful to the morbid asceticism which held celibacy in a sort of Manichaean reverence, that the scribes of the fourth, fifth, and later centuries freely tampered with the text, in the happily fruitless attempt to get rid of this meaning. They endeavoured, by putting the word in the plural or by omitting "wife," to suggest that the women whom the apostles travelled with were "deaconesses." Augustine, Tertullian, Ambrose, and others explain the verse of "ministering women" (Luke 8:2, 3). The false interpretation avenged itself on the bias which led to it. Valla adopts the wilful invention that the apostles, though married, travelled with their wives only as sisters. Such subterfuges have eaten away the heart of honest exegesis from many passages of Scripture, and originated the taunt that it is a "nose of wax," which readers can twist as they like. It was the cause of such shameful abuses and misrepresentations that at last the practice of travelling about with unmarried women, who went under the name of "sisters," "beloved," "companions," was distinctly forbidden by the third canon of the first Council of Nice. Simon Magus might unblushingly carry about with him a Tyrian woman named Helena; but apostles and true Christians would never have been guilty of any conduct which could give a handle to base suspicions. They travelled only with their wives. A sister. A Christian woman (1 Corinthians 7:15; Romans 16:1; James 2:15, etc.). A wife; i.e. as a wife. Other apostles. This is a positive mistranslation for "the rest of the apostles." It might be too much to infer positively from this that every one of the apostles and desposyni were married; but there is independent evidence and tradition to show that at any rate most of them were. The brethren of the Lord. They are clearly and undeniably distinguished from the apostles. According to the Helvidian theory (to which the plain language of the Gospels seems to point), they were sons of Joseph and Mary. This is the view of St. Clement of Alexandria in ancient times, and writers so different from each other as De Wette, Neander, Osiander, Meyer, Ewald, and Alford, in modern. The theory of Jerome, that they were cousins of Jesus, being sons of Alphseus and Mary, a sister of the Virgin, is on every ground absolutely untenable, and it was half dropped even by St. Jerome himself, when it had served his controversial purpose. The theory of Epiphanius, that they were sons of Joseph by a previous marriage, is possible, but incapable of proof. It comes from a tainted source - the apocryphal Gospels (see my 'Early Days of Christianity,' 2). Cephas. St. Paul also uses the Aramaic name in Galatians 2:9. Peter's wife is mentioned in Matthew 8:14 and in the tradition of her martyrdom (Clem. Alex., 'Strom.,' 7. § 63). 9:1-14 It is not new for a minister to meet with unkind returns for good-will to a people, and diligent and successful services among them. To the cavils of some, the apostle answers, so as to set forth himself as an example of self-denial, for the good of others. He had a right to marry as well as other apostles, and to claim what was needful for his wife, and his children if he had any, from the churches, without labouring with his own hands to get it. Those who seek to do our souls good, should have food provided for them. But he renounced his right, rather than hinder his success by claiming it. It is the people's duty to maintain their minister. He may wave his right, as Paul did; but those transgress a precept of Christ, who deny or withhold due support.
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