1 Corinthians 9:9
New International Version
For it is written in the Law of Moses: "Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain." Is it about oxen that God is concerned?

New Living Translation
For the law of Moses says, "You must not muzzle an ox to keep it from eating as it treads out the grain." Was God thinking only about oxen when he said this?

English Standard Version
For it is written in the Law of Moses, “You shall not muzzle an ox when it treads out the grain.” Is it for oxen that God is concerned?

Berean Study Bible
For it is written in the Law of Moses: “Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain.” Is it about oxen that God is concerned?

Berean Literal Bible
For in the Law of Moses it has been written: "You shall not muzzle an ox treading out grain." Is there care for the oxen with God?

New American Standard Bible
For it is written in the Law of Moses, "YOU SHALL NOT MUZZLE THE OX WHILE HE IS THRESHING." God is not concerned about oxen, is He?

King James Bible
For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn. Doth God take care for oxen?

Christian Standard Bible
For it is written in the law of Moses, Do not muzzle an ox while it treads out grain. Is God really concerned about oxen?

Good News Translation
We read in the Law of Moses, "Do not muzzle an ox when you are using it to thresh grain." Now, is God concerned about oxen?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
For it is written in the law of Moses, Do not muzzle an ox while it treads out grain. Is God really concerned with oxen?

International Standard Version
For in the Law of Moses it is written, "You must not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain." God is not only concerned about oxen, is he?

NET Bible
For it is written in the law of Moses, "Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain." God is not concerned here about oxen, is he?

New Heart English Bible
For it is written in the Law of Moses, "Do not muzzle an ox while it treads out the grain." Is it for the oxen that God cares,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
For it is written in The Law of Moses, “Do not muzzle the ox that treads.” Does God concern himself with oxen?

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Moses' Teachings say, "Never muzzle an ox when it is threshing grain." God's concern isn't for oxen.

New American Standard 1977
For it is written in the Law of Moses, “YOU SHALL NOT MUZZLE THE OX WHILE HE IS THRESHING.” God is not concerned about oxen, is He?

Jubilee Bible 2000
For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treads out the grain. Does God take care for oxen?

King James 2000 Bible
For it is written in the law of Moses, You shall not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treads out the grain. Does God care for oxen?

American King James Version
For it is written in the law of Moses, You shall not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treads out the corn. Does God take care for oxen?

American Standard Version
For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn. Is it for the oxen that God careth,

Douay-Rheims Bible
For it is written in the law of Moses: Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn. Doth God take care for oxen?

Darby Bible Translation
For in the law of Moses it is written, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that is treading out corn. Is God occupied about the oxen,

English Revised Version
For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn. Is it for the oxen that God careth,

Webster's Bible Translation
For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn. Doth God take care for oxen?

Weymouth New Testament
For in the Law of Moses it is written, "Thou shalt not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain."

World English Bible
For it is written in the law of Moses, "You shall not muzzle an ox while it treads out the grain." Is it for the oxen that God cares,

Young's Literal Translation
for in the law of Moses it hath been written, 'thou shalt not muzzle an ox treading out corn;' for the oxen doth God care?
Study Bible
The Rights of an Apostle
8Do I say this from a human perspective? Doesn’t the Law say the same thing? 9For it is written in the Law of Moses: “Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain.” Is it about oxen that God is concerned? 10Isn’t He actually speaking on our behalf? Indeed, this was written for us, because when the plowman plows and the thresher threshes, they should also expect to share in the harvest.…
Cross References
Deuteronomy 22:1
If you see your brother's ox or sheep straying, you must not ignore it; be sure to return it to your brother.

Deuteronomy 25:4
Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain.

Proverbs 12:10
A righteous man regards the life of his animal, but the tender mercies of the wicked are only cruelty.

Romans 4:23
Now the words "it was credited to him" were written not only for Abraham,

1 Timothy 5:18
For the Scripture says, "Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain," and, "The worker is worthy of his wages."

Treasury of Scripture

For it is written in the law of Moses, You shall not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treads out the corn. Does God take care for oxen?

Thou.

Deuteronomy 25:4
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn.

1 Timothy 5:18
For the scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that treadeth out the corn. And, The labourer is worthy of his reward.

Doth.

Numbers 22:28-35
And the LORD opened the mouth of the ass, and she said unto Balaam, What have I done unto thee, that thou hast smitten me these three times? …

Deuteronomy 5:14
But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, nor thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thine ox, nor thine ass, nor any of thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates; that thy manservant and thy maidservant may rest as well as thou.

Psalm 104:27
These wait all upon thee; that thou mayest give them their meat in due season.







Lexicon
For
γὰρ (gar)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1063: For. A primary particle; properly, assigning a reason.

it is written
γέγραπται (gegraptai)
Verb - Perfect Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1125: A primary verb; to 'grave', especially to write; figuratively, to describe.

in
ἐν (en)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

the
τῷ (tō)
Article - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Law
νόμῳ (nomō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3551: From a primary nemo; law, genitive case, specially, (including the volume); also of the Gospel), or figuratively.

of Moses:
Μωϋσέως (Mōuseōs)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3475: Or Moses, or Mouses of Hebrew origin; Moseus, Moses, or Mouses, the Hebrew lawgiver.

“Do not muzzle
κημώσεις (kēmōseis)
Verb - Future Indicative Active - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 5392: To muzzle, silence. From phimos; to muzzle.

an ox
βοῦν (boun)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 1016: An ox, cow, bull. Probably from the base of bosko; an ox, i.e. An animal of that species.

[while it is] treading out the grain.”
ἀλοῶντα (aloōnta)
Verb - Present Participle Active - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 248: To thresh (wheat). From the same as halon; to tread out grain.

[Is it]
μὴ (mē)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3361: Not, lest. A primary particle of qualified negation; not, lest; also (whereas ou expects an affirmative one) whether.

about
τῶν (tōn)
Article - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

oxen
βοῶν (boōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 1016: An ox, cow, bull. Probably from the base of bosko; an ox, i.e. An animal of that species.

[that] God
Θεῷ (Theō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2316: A deity, especially the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very.

is concerned?
μέλει (melei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 3199: It is a care, it is an object of anxiety, it concerns. A primary verb; to be of interest to, i.e. To concern.
(9) The ox that treadeth out the corn.--Better, the ox while treading out the corn. In this verse the question of the previous one is answered. The Law does say the same: "For it is written in the Law of Moses," etc. The pointed and emphatic mention of the Law of Moses would give the words great weight with Jewish opponents. On a space of hard ground called a threshing-floor the oxen were driven to and fro over the corn collected there, and thus the separation of the grain from the husk was accomplished.

Doth God take care for oxen?--We must not take these and the following words as a denial of the divine regard for the brute creation, which runs through the Mosaic law and is exemplified in Jonah 4:11, but as an expression of the Apostle's belief as to the ultimate and highest object of God's love. The good which such a provision as the Law achieved for the oxen was nothing compared to the good which it accomplished for man. God did not do this simply as a provision for the ox, but to teach us men humanity--to teach us that it is a divine principle that the labourer should have his reward.

Verse 9. - In the Law of Moses (Deuteronomy 25:4). He uses the same argument again in 1 Timothy 5:19. The mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn; rather, an ox while treading out the corn. The flail was not unknown, but a common mode of threshing was to let oxen tread the corn on the threshing floor. Doth God take care for oxen? Certainly he does; and St. Paul can hardly mean to imply that he does not, seeing that tenderness for the brute creation is a distinguishing characteristic of the Mosaic legislation (Exodus 23:12, 19; Deuteronomy 22:6, 7, 10, etc.). If St. Paul had failed to perceive this truth, he must have learnt it at least from Psalm 145:15, 16; Jonah 4:11. Even the Greeks showed by their proverb that they could pity the hunger of the poor beasts of burden starving in the midst of plenty. It is, however, a tendency of all Semitic idiom verbally to exclude or negative the inferior alternative. St. Paul did not intend to say, "God has no care for oxen;" for he knew that "his tender mercies are over all his works:" he only meant in Semitic fashion to say that the precept was much more important in its human application; and herein he consciously or unconsciously adopts the tone of Philo's comment on the same passage ('De Victim Offerentibus,' § 1), that, for present purposes, oxen might be left out of account. The rabbinic Midrash, which gave this turn to the passage, was happier and wiser than most specimens of their exegesis. St. Paul sets the typico allegorical interpretation above the literal in this instance (comp. 1 Timothy 5:18), because he regards it as the more important. It is a specimen of the common Jewish exegetic method of a fortiori or minori ad magus. Luther's curious comment is: "God cares for all things; but he does not care that anything should be written for oxen, because they cannot read"! 9:1-14 It is not new for a minister to meet with unkind returns for good-will to a people, and diligent and successful services among them. To the cavils of some, the apostle answers, so as to set forth himself as an example of self-denial, for the good of others. He had a right to marry as well as other apostles, and to claim what was needful for his wife, and his children if he had any, from the churches, without labouring with his own hands to get it. Those who seek to do our souls good, should have food provided for them. But he renounced his right, rather than hinder his success by claiming it. It is the people's duty to maintain their minister. He may wave his right, as Paul did; but those transgress a precept of Christ, who deny or withhold due support.
Jump to Previous
Care Cares Careth Concerned Corn Crushing Grain Law Moses Mouth Muzzle Occupied Orders Ox Oxen Right Threshing Treadeth Treading Treads Written
Jump to Next
Care Cares Careth Concerned Corn Crushing Grain Law Moses Mouth Muzzle Occupied Orders Ox Oxen Right Threshing Treadeth Treading Treads Written
Links
1 Corinthians 9:9 NIV
1 Corinthians 9:9 NLT
1 Corinthians 9:9 ESV
1 Corinthians 9:9 NASB
1 Corinthians 9:9 KJV

1 Corinthians 9:9 Bible Apps
1 Corinthians 9:9 Biblia Paralela
1 Corinthians 9:9 Chinese Bible
1 Corinthians 9:9 French Bible
1 Corinthians 9:9 German Bible

Alphabetical: about an concerned Do For God grain he in is it Law Moses muzzle not of out ox oxen shall that the threshing treading while written You

NT Letters: 1 Corinthians 9:9 For it is written in the law (1 Cor. 1C iC 1Cor i cor icor) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
1 Corinthians 9:8
Top of Page
Top of Page