Matthew 8:5
New International Version
When Jesus had entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, asking for help.

New Living Translation
When Jesus returned to Capernaum, a Roman officer came and pleaded with him,

English Standard Version
When he had entered Capernaum, a centurion came forward to him, appealing to him,

Berean Study Bible
When Jesus had entered Capernaum, a centurion came and pleaded with Him,

Berean Literal Bible
And He having entered into Capernaum, a centurion came to Him, imploring Him,

New American Standard Bible
And when Jesus entered Capernaum, a centurion came to Him, imploring Him,

King James Bible
And when Jesus was entered into Capernaum, there came unto him a centurion, beseeching him,

Christian Standard Bible
When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, pleading with him,

Contemporary English Version
When Jesus was going into the town of Capernaum, an army officer came up to him and said,

Good News Translation
When Jesus entered Capernaum, a Roman officer met him and begged for help:

Holman Christian Standard Bible
When He entered Capernaum, a centurion came to Him, pleading with Him, "

International Standard Version
When Jesus returned to Capernaum, a centurion came up to him and begged him repeatedly,

NET Bible
When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him asking for help:

New Heart English Bible
And when he came into Capernaum, a centurion came to him, asking him,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But when Yeshua entered Kapernahum, a certain Centurion approached him and he prayed to him.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When Jesus went to Capernaum, a Roman army officer came to beg him for help.

New American Standard 1977
And when He had entered Capernaum, a centurion came to Him, entreating Him,

Jubilee Bible 2000
And when Jesus was entering into Capernaum, a centurion came unto him, beseeching him,

King James 2000 Bible
And when Jesus was entered into Capernaum, there came unto him a centurion, beseeching him,

American King James Version
And when Jesus was entered into Capernaum, there came to him a centurion, beseeching him,

American Standard Version
And when he was entered into Capernaum, there came unto him a centurion, beseeching him,

Douay-Rheims Bible
And when he had entered into Capharnaum, there came to him a centurion, beseeching him,

Darby Bible Translation
And when he had entered into Capernaum, a centurion came to him, beseeching him,

English Revised Version
And when he was entered into Capernaum, there came unto him a centurion, beseeching him,

Webster's Bible Translation
And when Jesus had entered into Capernaum, there came to him a centurion, beseeching him,

Weymouth New Testament
After His entry into Capernaum a Captain came to Him, and entreated Him.

World English Bible
When he came into Capernaum, a centurion came to him, asking him,

Young's Literal Translation
And Jesus having entered into Capernaum, there came to him a centurion calling upon him,
Study Bible
The Faith of the Centurion
4Then Jesus instructed him, “See that you don’t tell anyone. But go, show yourself to the priest and offer the gift prescribed by Moses, as a testimony to them.” 5When Jesus had entered Capernaum, a centurion came and pleaded with Him, 6“Lord, my servant lies at home, paralyzed and in terrible agony.”…
Cross References
Luke 7:1
When Jesus had concluded His discourse in the hearing of the people, He went to Capernaum.

Luke 7:3
When the centurion heard about Jesus, he sent some Jewish elders to ask Him to come and heal his servant.

Acts 9:38
Since Lydda was near Joppa, the disciples heard that Peter was there and sent two men to urge him, "Come to us without delay."

Treasury of Scripture

And when Jesus was entered into Capernaum, there came to him a centurion, beseeching him,

entered.

Matthew 4:13
And leaving Nazareth, he came and dwelt in Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast, in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim:

Matthew 9:1
And he entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into his own city.

Matthew 11:23
And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.

a centurion.

Matthew 15:39
And he sent away the multitude, and took ship, and came into the coasts of Magdala.

Matthew 27:54
Now when the centurion, and they that were with him, watching Jesus, saw the earthquake, and those things that were done, they feared greatly, saying, Truly this was the Son of God.

Mark 15:39
And when the centurion, which stood over against him, saw that he so cried out, and gave up the ghost, he said, Truly this man was the Son of God.

Luke 7:2
And a certain centurion's servant, who was dear unto him, was sick, and ready to die.







Lexicon
When
δὲ (de)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1161: A primary particle; but, and, etc.

[Jesus]
αὐτοῦ (autou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

had entered
Εἰσελθόντος (Eiselthontos)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 1525: To go in, come in, enter. From eis and erchomai; to enter.

Capernaum,
Καφαρναοὺμ (Kapharnaoum)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2584: Capernaum, a town of Galilee. Of Hebrew origin; Capernaum, a place in Palestine.

a centurion
ἑκατόνταρχος (hekatontarchos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 1543: A centurion of the Roman army. Or hekatontarchos hek-at-on'-tar-khos; from hekaton and archo; the captain of one hundred men.

came
προσῆλθεν (prosēlthen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 4334: From pros and erchomai; to approach, i.e. come near, visit, or worship, assent to.

[and] pleaded
παρακαλῶν (parakalōn)
Verb - Present Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3870: From para and kaleo; to call near, i.e. Invite, invoke.

with Him,
αὐτὸν (auton)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Accusative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.
(5) In St. Luke the narrative follows immediately upon the Sermon on the Plain; in St. Matthew (the healing of the leper intervening), upon the Sermon on the Mount. The juxtaposition in both cases seems to imply a connection between the teaching and the act that had fixed itself on men's minds. The act was, indeed, chiefly memorable for the teaching to which it led. A comparison of the two narratives suggests the thought that St. Matthew records the miracle more with reference to the associated teaching, St. Luke after more close inquiry into the details and circumstances. Here, e.g., the centurion is said to have come to our Lord himself; but from St. Luke's report we learn that he never came at all in person, but sent first the elders of the Jews, and then his friends.

A centurion.--The presence of a centurion (a word originally meaning the commander of a hundred soldiers, out, like most words of the kind, afterwards used with a greater latitude of meaning) implied that of a garrison stationed at Capernaum to preserve order. So we find a centurion with his soldiers at Caesarea (Acts 10:1). At Jerusalem, it would appear, it was thought necessary to station a Chiliarch, or "chief captain" of a thousand soldiers (Acts 21:31); and the same word meets us as connected with the birthday feast of the Tetrarch Antipas (Mark 6:21).

Here, as in the case of Cornelius, the faith and the life of Judaism (seen, we may well believe, to more advantage in the villages of Galilee than amid the factions of Jerusalem) had made a deep impression on the soldier's mind. He found a purity, reverence, simplicity, and nobleness of life which he had not found elsewhere; and so he "loved the nation" (Luke 7:5), and built anew the synagogue of the town. It is probable, as has been already said, that among the ruins of Tell-H-m, identified as Capernaum, we have the remains of the very fabric thus erected. And he, in like manner, had made a favourable impression upon the Jews of that city. They felt his love for them, were ready to go on his errand, to support his prayer with all earnestness, to attest his worth. To one whose work had been, like that of St. Luke, to preach the gospel to the Gentiles, all these incidents would be precious, as early tokens of that breaking-down of barriers, that brotherhood of mankind in Christ, of which the Apostle who was his companion was the great preacher.

Verses 5-13. - The healing of the centurion's servant. (Vers. 5-10; parallel passage Luke 7:1-3, 6-10. Vers. 11, 12, equivalent to Luke 13:28, 29.) According to St. Luke, the centurion sent first elders of the Jews to plead for him, and afterwards friends, and expressly said by them that he did not think himself worthy to come to Jesus. Their return in ver. 10 seems to forbid the supposition that he eventually came. This detailed narrative seems more likely than St. Matthew's, which is not only compressed, but, if taken by itself, gives a wrong idea of what appears to have actually taken place. But quod tacit per alium facit per se, and as Trench points out, this is "an exchange of persons, of which all historical narrative and all the language of our common life is full. A comparison of Mark 10:35 with ch. 20:20 will furnish another example of the same." The fact is that St. Matthew (or, perhaps, the original framer of the source that he used, or those through whose hands it passed) seizes on the Gentilic origin of the centurion, without troubling himself to record his previous kind and generous attitude towards the Jews, and the interest that they now show on his behalf. This led to the omission of the second group of messengers also, and, of course, to the modification of the language where necessary, e.g. ver. 13. For the same reason, St. Matthew records vers. 11, 12 in this place. For the contrast between this and the superficially similar miracle recorded in John 4:46, sqq., cf. Trench on that miracle. Verse 5. - And when Jesus (Revised Version, he) was entered into Capernaum. (On Capernaum, see Matthew 4:13.) There came unto him; i.e. by messengers, as we learn from St. Luke (vide supra). A centurion, beseeching him. The centurion probably belonged to the soldiers of Antipas, in whose district Capernaum lay. They would naturally be organized after the Roman manner; of the forces of the Indian native states and our own. It should be observed, by the way, that even the imperial troops stationed in Palestine were drawn, not from distant lands, but from the non-Jewish inhabitants of the country, perhaps especially from Samaritans (vide Schurer, I. 2. p. 50). 8:5-13 This centurion was a heathen, a Roman soldier. Though he was a soldier, yet he was a godly man. No man's calling or place will be an excuse for unbelief and sin. See how he states his servant's case. We should concern ourselves for the souls of our children and servants, who are spiritually sick, who feel not spiritual evils, who know not that which is spiritually good; and we should bring them to Christ by faith and prayers. Observe his self-abasement. Humble souls are made more humble by Christ's gracious dealings with them. Observe his great faith. The more diffident we are of ourselves, the stronger will be our confidence in Christ. Herein the centurion owns him to have Divine power, and a full command of all the creatures and powers of nature, as a master over his servants. Such servants we all should be to God; we must go and come, according to the directions of his word and the disposals of his providence. But when the Son of man comes he finds little faith, therefore he finds little fruit. An outward profession may cause us to be called children of the kingdom; but if we rest in that, and have nothing else to show, we shall be cast out. The servant got a cure of his disease, and the master got the approval of his faith. What was said to him, is said to all, Believe, and ye shall receive; only believe. See the power of Christ, and the power of faith. The healing of our souls is at once the effect and evidence of our interest in the blood of Christ.
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