Acts 18:18
New International Version
Paul stayed on in Corinth for some time. Then he left the brothers and sisters and sailed for Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. Before he sailed, he had his hair cut off at Cenchreae because of a vow he had taken.

New Living Translation
Paul stayed in Corinth for some time after that, then said good-bye to the brothers and sisters and went to nearby Cenchrea. There he shaved his head according to Jewish custom, marking the end of a vow. Then he set sail for Syria, taking Priscilla and Aquila with him.

English Standard Version
After this, Paul stayed many days longer and then took leave of the brothers and set sail for Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila. At Cenchreae he had cut his hair, for he was under a vow.

Berean Study Bible
Paul remained in Corinth for quite some time before saying goodbye to the brothers. He had his head shaved in Cenchrea to keep a vow he had made, and then he sailed for Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila.

Berean Literal Bible
Now Paul, having remained many days more, having taken leave of the brothers, sailed away to Syria--and with him Priscilla and Aquila--having shaved the head in Cenchrea, for he had a vow.

New American Standard Bible
Paul, having remained many days longer, took leave of the brethren and put out to sea for Syria, and with him were Priscilla and Aquila. In Cenchrea he had his hair cut, for he was keeping a vow.

King James Bible
And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and then took his leave of the brethren, and sailed thence into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn his head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

Christian Standard Bible
After staying for some time, Paul said farewell to the brothers and sisters and sailed away to Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. He shaved his head at Cenchreae because of a vow he had taken.

Contemporary English Version
After Paul had stayed for a while with the Lord's followers in Corinth, he told them goodbye and sailed on to Syria with Aquila and Priscilla. But before he left, he had his head shaved at Cenchreae because he had made a promise to God.

Good News Translation
Paul stayed on with the believers in Corinth for many days, then left them and sailed off with Priscilla and Aquila for Syria. Before sailing from Cenchreae he had his head shaved because of a vow he had taken.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
So Paul, having stayed on for many days, said good-bye to the brothers and sailed away to Syria. Priscilla and Aquila were with him. He shaved his head at Cenchreae because he had taken a vow.

International Standard Version
After staying there for quite a while longer, Paul said goodbye to the brothers and sailed for Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. He had his hair cut in Cenchrea, since he was under a vow.

NET Bible
Paul, after staying many more days in Corinth, said farewell to the brothers and sailed away to Syria accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. He had his hair cut off at Cenchrea because he had made a vow.

New Heart English Bible
Paul, having stayed after this many more days, took his leave of the brothers, and sailed from there for Syria, together with Priscilla and Aquila. He shaved his head in Cenchreae, for he had a vow.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And when Paulus had been there for many days, he bade farewell to the brethren and he journeyed by sea to go to Syria, and Priscilla and Aqilaus came with him when he shaved his head in Qenkreos, because he had vowed a vow for himself.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
After staying in Corinth quite a while longer, Paul left [for Ephesus]. Priscilla and Aquila went with him. In the city of Cenchrea, Aquila had his hair cut, since he had taken a vow. From Cenchrea they took a boat headed for Syria

New American Standard 1977
And Paul, having remained many days longer, took leave of the brethren and put out to sea for Syria, and with him were Priscilla and Aquila. In Cenchrea he had his hair cut, for he was keeping a vow.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while and then took his leave of the brethren and sailed from there into Syria and with him Priscilla and Aquila, having shorn his head in Cenchrea, for he had a vow.

King James 2000 Bible
And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and then took his leave of the brethren, and sailed from there into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shaved his head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

American King James Version
And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and then took his leave of the brothers, and sailed there into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn his head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

American Standard Version
And Paul, having tarried after this yet many days, took his leave of the brethren, and sailed thence for Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila: having shorn his head in Cenchreae; for he had a vow.

Douay-Rheims Bible
But Paul, when he had stayed yet many days, taking his leave of the brethren, sailed thence into Syria (and with him Priscilla and Aquila), having shorn his head in Cenchrae: for he had a vow.

Darby Bible Translation
And Paul, having yet stayed [there] many days, took leave of the brethren and sailed thence to Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila, having shorn his head in Cenchrea, for he had a vow;

English Revised Version
And Paul, having tarried after this yet many days, took his leave of the brethren, and sailed thence for Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn his head in Cenchreae: for he had a vow.

Webster's Bible Translation
And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and took his leave of the brethren, and sailed thence into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn his head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

Weymouth New Testament
After remaining a considerable time longer in Corinth, Paul took leave of the brethren and set sail for Syria; and Priscilla and Aquila were with him. He had shaved his head at Cenchreae, because he was bound by a vow.

World English Bible
Paul, having stayed after this many more days, took his leave of the brothers, and sailed from there for Syria, together with Priscilla and Aquila. He shaved his head in Cenchreae, for he had a vow.

Young's Literal Translation
And Paul having remained yet a good many days, having taken leave of the brethren, was sailing to Syria -- and with him are Priscilla and Aquilas -- having shorn his head in Cenchera, for he had a vow;
Study Bible
Paul Returns to Antioch
17At this, the crowd seized Sosthenes the synagogue leader and beat him in front of the judgment seat. But none of this was of any concern to Gallio. 18Paul remained in Corinth for quite some time before saying goodbye to the brothers. He had his head shaved in Cenchrea to keep a vow he had made , and then he sailed for Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. 19When they reached Ephesus, Paul parted ways with Priscilla and Aquila. He himself went into the synagogue there and reasoned with the Jews.…
Cross References
Numbers 6:2
"Speak to the Israelites and tell them: If a man or woman makes a special vow, the vow of a Nazirite, to separate himself to the LORD,

Numbers 6:5
For the entire period of his vow of separation, no razor shall pass over his head. He must be holy until the time of his separation to the LORD is complete; he must let the hair of his head grow long.

Matthew 4:24
News about Him spread all over Syria, and people brought to Him all who were ill with various diseases, those suffering acute pain, the demon-possessed, those having seizures, and the paralyzed--and He healed them.

Mark 6:46
After bidding them farewell, He went up on the mountain to pray.

Acts 1:15
In those days Peter stood up among the brothers (a gathering of about a hundred and twenty) and said,

Acts 18:2
There he found a Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus, who had recently come from Italy with his wife Priscilla, because Claudius had ordered all the Jews to leave Rome. Paul went to visit them,

Acts 18:26
And he began to speak boldly in the synagogue. When Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they took him in and explained to him the way of God more accurately.

Acts 18:27
When Apollos resolved to cross over to Achaia, the brothers encouraged him and wrote to the disciples there to welcome him. On his arrival, he greatly aided those who by grace had believed.

Acts 21:23
Therefore do what we advise you. There are four men with us who have taken a vow.

Acts 21:24
Take these men, purify yourself along with them, and pay their expenses so they can have their heads shaved. Then everyone will know that there is no truth to these rumors about you, but that you also live in obedience to the Law.

Romans 16:1
I commend to you our sister Phoebe, a servant of the church in Cenchrea.

Treasury of Scripture

And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and then took his leave of the brothers, and sailed there into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn his head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

Syria.

Acts 15:23,41
And they wrote letters by them after this manner; The apostles and elders and brethren send greeting unto the brethren which are of the Gentiles in Antioch and Syria and Cilicia: …

Acts 21:3
Now when we had discovered Cyprus, we left it on the left hand, and sailed into Syria, and landed at Tyre: for there the ship was to unlade her burden.

Galatians 1:21
Afterwards I came into the regions of Syria and Cilicia;

Priscilla.

Acts 18:2
And found a certain Jew named Aquila, born in Pontus, lately come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla; (because that Claudius had commanded all Jews to depart from Rome:) and came unto them.

having.

Acts 21:24
Them take, and purify thyself with them, and be at charges with them, that they may shave their heads: and all may know that those things, whereof they were informed concerning thee, are nothing; but that thou thyself also walkest orderly, and keepest the law.

Numbers 6:5-9,18
All the days of the vow of his separation there shall no rasor come upon his head: until the days be fulfilled, in the which he separateth himself unto the LORD, he shall be holy, and shall let the locks of the hair of his head grow…

1 Corinthians 9:20
And unto the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law;

Cenchrea.

Romans 16:1
I commend unto you Phebe our sister, which is a servant of the church which is at Cenchrea:







Lexicon
Paul
Παῦλος (Paulos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3972: Paul, Paulus. Of Latin origin; Paulus, the name of a Roman and of an apostle.

remained [in Corinth]
προσμείνας (prosmeinas)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4357: From pros and meno; to stay further, i.e. Remain in a place, with a person; figuratively, to adhere to, persevere in.

for quite
ἱκανὰς (hikanas)
Adjective - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 2425: From hiko; competent, i.e. Ample or fit.

some
ἔτι (eti)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 2089: (a) of time: still, yet, even now, (b) of degree: even, further, more, in addition. Perhaps akin to etos; 'yet, ' still.

time
ἡμέρας (hēmeras)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 2250: A day, the period from sunrise to sunset.

[before] saying goodbye
ἀποταξάμενος (apotaxamenos)
Verb - Aorist Participle Middle - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 657: To withdraw from, take leave of, renounce, send away.

to the
τοῖς (tois)
Article - Dative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

brothers.
ἀδελφοῖς (adelphois)
Noun - Dative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

{He had} [his]
τὴν (tēn)
Article - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

head
κεφαλήν (kephalēn)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2776: From the primary kapto; the head, literally or figuratively.

shaved
κειράμενος (keiramenos)
Verb - Aorist Participle Middle - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2751: To shear, cut the hair of; mid: I cut my own hair, have my hair cut. A primary verb; to shear.

in
ἐν (en)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

Cenchrea
Κενχρεαῖς (Kenchreais)
Noun - Dative Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 2747: Cenchreae, the port of Corinth on the Saronic Gulf. Probably from kegchros; Cenchreae, a port of Corinth.

to keep
γὰρ (gar)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1063: For. A primary particle; properly, assigning a reason.

a vow
εὐχήν (euchēn)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2171: From euchomai; properly, a wish, expressed as a petition to God, or in votive obligation.

he had [ made ],
εἶχεν (eichen)
Verb - Imperfect Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2192: To have, hold, possess. Including an alternate form scheo skheh'-o; a primary verb; to hold.

[and then] he sailed
ἐξέπλει (exeplei)
Verb - Imperfect Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1602: To sail out (of harbor), sail away. From ek and pleo; to depart by ship.

for
εἰς (eis)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1519: A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.

Syria,
Συρίαν (Syrian)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 4947: Syria, a great Roman imperial province, united with Cilicia. Probably of Hebrew origin; Syria, a region of Asia.

accompanied by
σὺν (syn)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 4862: With. A primary preposition denoting union; with or together.

Priscilla
Πρίσκιλλα (Priskilla)
Noun - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 4252: Diminutive of Priska; Priscilla, a Christian woman.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

Aquila.
Ἀκύλας (Akylas)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 207: Probably for Latin aquila; Akulas, an Israelite.
(18) And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while.--Literally, tarried yet many days, the phrase probably covering a period of some months. The fact is noted as following on Gallio's repression of the enmity of the Jews. The Apostle could stay and work on without molestation. The time of his voyage was probably, as in the second journey from Corinth to Jerusalem, after the Passover, and before Pentecost. (See Note on Acts 2:1.) It was the most favourable time of the year for travelling, and it brought the Apostle into contact with a larger number both of Hellenistic Jews and Hebrews than were found at other times. We can only infer, more or less conjecturally, the motives of his journey. (1) As afterwards, in Acts 20:3-4, he may have wished, in carrying out the terms of the compact with the Church of Jerusalem (Galatians 2:10), to be the bearer of alms collected for the disciples there. By some writers, however, this visit is identified with that of which St. Paul there speaks. (2) The vow which he had taken (see Note below) required a visit to the Temple for its completion. (3) There might be a natural wish to report, as in Acts 15:4, the results of his ministry among the Gentiles, in what, from the stand-point of Jerusalem, would seem the remoter regions of Macedonia and Achaia.

Priscilla and Aquila.--On the priority given to the name of the wife, see Note on Acts 18:2.

Having shorn his head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.--The grammatical structure of the Greek sentence makes it possible to refer the words to Aquila as well as St. Paul, but there is hardly the shadow of a doubt that the latter is meant. (1) If Aquila had taken the vow he too would have to go to Jerusalem instead of remaining at Ephesus. (2) The language of St. James in Acts 21:23-24, implies a conviction, as resting on past experience, that St. Paul would willingly connect himself with those who had such a vow. It remains to inquire (1) as to the nature and conditions of the vow; (2) as to St. Paul's motives in taking it.

Verse 18. - Having tarried after this yet many days for after this tarried there yet a good while, and then, A.V.; for for into, A.V.; Cenchreae for Cenchrea, A.V. Took his leave; ἀποταξάμενος, here and again in ver. 21. This is a somewhat peculiar use of the word, which occurs also in Luke 9:61 and 2 Corinthians 2:13 (see too Mark 6:46). It is used in the same sense in Josephus ('Ant. Jud.,' 11. 8:6). In a metaphorical sense it means" to renounce," "to bid adieu to" (Luke 14:23). Of the six times it occurs in the New Testament, four are in St. Luke's writings and one in St. Paul's. With him Priscilla and Aquila, having shorn his head in Cenchreae, etc. There is great diversity of opinion as to whether it was St. Paul or Aquila who had the vow. Meyer thinks that the mention of Priscilla before Aquila, contrary to the order in ver. 2 and in ver. 26 (where, however, the R.T. reads "Priscilla and Aquila), is a clear indication that Luke meant the words κειράμενος κ.τ.λ., to refer to Aquila, not to St. Paul, and Howson takes the same view. But this is a very weak argument, refuted at once by Romans 16:3 and 2 Timothy 4:19, as well as by the whole run of the passage, in which Paul is throughout the person spoken of; or, as Alford puts it, in the consecutive narrative from ver. 18 to ver. 25, there are nine aorist participles, of which eight apply to Paul, as the subject of the section, making it scarcely doubtful that the ninth applies to him likewise. Moreover, there is no conceivable reason why the vow should be mentioned if it was taken by Aquila, and, what is still more conclusive, the person who went to Jerusalem, i.e. Paul, must be the one who had the vow, not the person who stayed behind, i.e. Aquila. In fact, nobody would ever have thought of making Aquila the subject if it were not for the thought that there is an incongruity with Paul's character in his making a vow of that kind. But we must take what we find in Scripture, and not force it to speak our own thoughts. As regards the nature of the vow, it is not quite clear what it was. It was not the simple Nazaritic vow described in Numbers 6:18-21; nor is the word here used by St. Luke (κειράμενος) the one which is there and elsewhere employed by the LXX., and by St. Luke himself in Acts 21:24, of that final shaving of the hair of the Nazarite for the purpose of offering it at the door of the tabernacle (ξυράω). It seems rather to have been of the nature of that vow which Josephus speaks of as customary for persons in any affliction, viz. to make a vow that, for thirty days previous to that on which they intend to offer sacrifice, they will abstain from wine and will shave off (ξυρήσασθαι) their hair, adding that Bernice was now at Jerusalem in order to perform such a vow ('Bell. Jud.,' it. 15:1). But it further appears, from certain passages in the Mishna, that, if any one had a Nazarite vow upon him outside the limits of the Holy Land, he could not fulfill such vow till he was come to the Holy Laud, to Jerusalem; but it was allowable in such case to cut his hair short (κείρεσθαι τὴν κεφαλήν), and as some say to take it with him to Jerusalem, and there offer it at the same time that he offered his sacrifice and shaved his head (ξυρήσασθαι). It would seem, therefore, that either in a severe illness or under some great danger (ἀνάγκη) St. Paul had made such a vow; that he had been unwilling to cut his hair short at Corinth, where he was thrown so much into the society of Greeks, and therefore did so at Cenchreae just before he embarked for Syria; and that he made all haste to reach Jerusalem in time for the Passover, that he might there accomplish his vow (see Bishop Wordsworth's note on Acts 18:18; and Farrar's ' Life of St. Paul,' 2. p. 2). His motives for the vow may have been partly those described on another occasion (Acts 21:24), and partly his own Jewish feelings of piety showing themselves in the accustomed way. Cenchreae. The eastern port of Corinth; a considerable place. There was a Church there, doubtless founded by St. Paul during his stay at Corinth (Romans 16:1). 18:18-23 While Paul found he laboured not in vain, he continued labouring. Our times are in God's hand; we purpose, but he disposes; therefore we must make all promises with submission to the will of God; not only if providence permits, but if God does not otherwise direct our motions. A very good refreshment it is to a faithful minister, to have for awhile the society of his brethren. Disciples are compassed about with infirmity; ministers must do what they can to strengthen them, by directing them to Christ, who is their Strength. Let us earnestly seek, in our several places, to promote the cause of Christ, forming plans that appear to us most proper, but relying on the Lord to bring them to pass if he sees good.
Jump to Previous
Accompanied Aquila Aq'uila Cenchrea Cenchreae Cen'chre-Ae Considerable Corinth Cut Good Hair Head Keeping Leave Paul Priscilla Remaining Sailed Sea Shaved Shorn Syria Tarried Thence Time Together Vow
Jump to Next
Accompanied Aquila Aq'uila Cenchrea Cenchreae Cen'chre-Ae Considerable Corinth Cut Good Hair Head Keeping Leave Paul Priscilla Remaining Sailed Sea Shaved Shorn Syria Tarried Thence Time Together Vow
Links
Acts 18:18 NIV
Acts 18:18 NLT
Acts 18:18 ESV
Acts 18:18 NASB
Acts 18:18 KJV

Acts 18:18 Bible Apps
Acts 18:18 Biblia Paralela
Acts 18:18 Chinese Bible
Acts 18:18 French Bible
Acts 18:18 German Bible

Alphabetical: a accompanied and Aquila at because Before brethren brothers by Cenchrea Corinth cut days for had hair having he him his in keeping leave left longer many of off on out Paul Priscilla put remained sailed sea some stayed Syria taken the Then time to took vow was were with

NT Apostles: Acts 18:18 Paul having stayed after this many more (Acts of the Apostles Ac) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Acts 18:17
Top of Page
Top of Page