Tyre
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Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary
Tyre

Tyrus, strength; rock; sharp

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Tyre

(a rock), a celebrated commercial city of Phoenicia, on the coast of the Mediterranean. Its Hebrew name, Tzor , signifies a rock; which well agrees with the site of Sur , the modern town, on a rocky peninsula, formerly an island. There is no doubt that, previous to the siege of the city by Alexander the Great, Tyre was situated on an island; but, according to the tradition of the inhabitants, there was a city on the mainland before there was a city on the island; and the tradition receives some color from the name of Palaetyrus, or Old Tyre, which was borne in Greek times by a city on the continent, thirty stadia to the south. Notices in the Bible . --In the Bible Tyre is named for the first time in the of Joshua, ch. (Joshua 19:29) where it is adverted to as a fortified city (in the Authorized Version "the strong city") in reference to the boundaries of the tribe of Asher, But the first passages in the Hebrew historical writings, or in ancient history generally, which actual glimpses of the actual condition of Tyre are in the book of Samuel, (2 Samuel 6:11) in connection with Hiram king of Tyre sending cedar wood and workmen to David, for building him a palace; and subsequently in the book of Kings, in connection with the building of Solomon's temple. It is evident that under Solomon there was a close alliance between the Hebrews and the Tyrians. Hiram supplied Solomon with cedar wood, precious metals and workmen, and gave him sailors for the voyage to Ophir and India, while on the other hand Solomon gave Hiram supplies of corn and oil, ceded to him some cities, and permitted him to make use of some havens on the Red Sea. (1 Kings 9:11-14; 26-28; 10:22) These friendly relations survived for a time the disastrous secession of the ten tribes, and a century later Ahab married a daughter of Ethbaal king of the Sidonians, (1 Kings 16:31) who, according to Menander, was daughter of Ithobal king of Tyre. When mercantile cupidity induced the Tyrians and the neighboring Phoenicians to buy Hebrew captives from their enemies, and to sell them as slaves to the Greeks and Edomites, there commenced denunciations, and at first threats of retaliation. (Joel 3:4-8; Amos 1:9,10) When Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, had taken the city of Samaria, had conquered the kingdom of Israel, and carried its inhabitants into captivity, he laid siege to Tyre, which, however, successfully resisted his arms. It is in reference to this siege that the prophecy against Tyre in Isaiah, (Isaiah 23:1) ... was uttered. After the siege of Tyre by Shalmaneser (which must have taken place not long after 721 B.C.). Tyre remained a powerful state, with its own kings, (Jeremiah 25:22; 27:3; Ezekiel 28:2-12) remarkable for its wealth, with territory on the mainland, and protected by strong fortifications. (Ezekiel 26:4,6,8,10,12; 27:11; 28:5; Zechariah 9:3) Our knowledge of its condition thenceforward until the siege by Nebuchadnezzar depends entirely on various notices of it by the Hebrew prophets; but some of these notices are singularly full, and especially the twenty-seventh chapter of Ezekiel furnishes us, on some points, with details such as have scarcely come down to us respecting any one city of antiquity excepting Rome and Athens. Siege by Nebuchadnezzar . --In the midst of great prosperity and wealth, which was the natural result of extensive trade, (Ezekiel 28:4) Nebuchadnezzar, at the head of an army of the Chaldees, invaded Judea and captured Jerusalem. As Tyre was so near to Jerusalem, and as the conquerors were a fierce and formidable race, (Habakkuk 1:6) It would naturally he supposed that this event would have excited alarm and terror amongst the Tyrians. Instead of this, we may infer from Ezekiel's statement, (Ezekiel 26:2) that their predominant feeling was one of exultation. At first sight this appears strange and almost inconceivable; but it is rendered intelligible by some previous events in Jewish history. Only 34 years before the destruction of Jerusalem commenced the celebrated reformation of Josiah, B.C. 622. This momentous religious revolution, (2 Kings 22:1; 2 Kings 23:1) ... fully explains the exultation and malevolence of the Tyrians. In that reformation Josiah had heaped insults on the gods who were the objects of Tyrian veneration and love. Indeed, he seemed to have endeavored to exterminate their religion. (2 Kings 23:20) These acts must have been regarded by the Tyrians as a series of sacrilegious and abominable outrages; and we can scarcely doubt that the death in battle of Josiah at Megiddo and the subsequent destruction of the city and temple of Jerusalem, were hailed by them with triumph and retribution in human affairs. This joy, as instances of divine retribution in human affairs. This joy, however, must soon have given way to other feelings, when Nebuchadnezzar invaded Phoenicia and laid siege to Tyre. That siege lasted thirteen years, and it is still a disputed point whether Tyre was actually taken by Nebuchadnezzar on this occasion. However this may be, it is probable that, on some terms or other, Tyre submitted to the Chaldees. The rule of Nebuchadnezzar over Tyre, though real, may have been light, and in the nature of an alliance. Attack by the Persians; Capture by Alexander . --During the Persian domination the Tyrians were subject in name to the Persian king and may have given him tribute. With the rest of Phoenicia they had submitted to the Persians without striking a blow. Toward the close of the following century, B.C. 332, Tyre was assailed for the third time by a great conqueror. At that time Tyre was situated on an island nearly half a mile from the mainland; it was completely surrounded by prodigious walls, the loftiest portion of which on the side fronting the mainland reached a height of not less than 150 feet; and notwithstanding the persevering efforts of Alexander, he could not have succeeded in his attempt if the harbor of Tyre to the north had not been blockaded by the Cyprians and that to the south by the Phoenicians, thus affording an opportunity to Alexander for uniting the Island to the mainland by an; enormous artificial mole. (The materials for this he obtained from the remains of old Tyre scraping the very dust from her rocks into the sea, as prophesied by Ezekiel, (Ezekiel 26:3,4,12,21) more than 250 years before.) The immediate results of the capture by Alexander were most disastrous to Tyre, as its brave defenders were put to death; and in accordance with the barbarous policy of ancient times, 30,000 of its inhabitants, including slaves, free females and free children, were sold as slaves. It gradually, how ever, recovered its prosperity through the immigration of fresh settlers, though its trade is said to have suffered by the vicinity and rivalry of Alexandria. Under the Macedonian successors of Alexander it shared the fortunes of the Seleucidae. Under the Romans, at first it enjoyed a kind of freedom. Subsequently, however, on the arrival of Augustus in the East, he is said to have deprived both Tyre and Sidon of their liberties for seditious conduct. Still the prosperity of Tyre in the time of Augustus was undeniably great. Strabo gives an account of it at that period, speaks of the great wealth which it derived from the dyes of the celebrated Tyrian purple which, as is well known were extracted from shell-fish found on the coast, belonging to a species of the genus Murex . Tyre in the time of Christ and since. --When visited by Christ, (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) Tyre was perhaps more populous than Jerusalem, and if so, it was undoubtedly the largest city which the saviour is known to have visited. At the time of the crusades it was still a flourishing; city, when if surrendered to the Christians on the 27th of June 1144. It continued more than a century and a half in the hands of Christians, but was deserted by its inhabitants in A.D. 1291 upon the conquest of Acre (Ptolemais) by the sultan of Egypt and Damascus. This was the turning-point in the history of Tyre, which has never recovered from the blow. Its present condition is a fulfillment of Ezekiel's prophecy (Ezekiel 28:5) It contains, according to Volney, 50 or 60 poor families, who live in part by fishing; and is, as Bruce describes it, "rock whereon fishers dry their nets."

Easton's Bible Dictionary
A rock, now es-Sur; an ancient Phoenician city, about 23 miles, in a direct line, north of Acre, and 20 south of Sidon. Sidon was the oldest Phoenician city, but Tyre had a longer and more illustrious history. The commerce of the whole world was gathered into the warehouses of Tyre. "Tyrian merchants were the first who ventured to navigate the Mediterranean waters; and they founded their colonies on the coasts and neighbouring islands of the AEgean Sea, in Greece, on the northern coast of Africa, at Carthage and other places, in Sicily and Corsica, in Spain at Tartessus, and even beyond the pillars of Hercules at Gadeira (Cadiz)" (Driver's Isaiah). In the time of David a friendly alliance was entered into between the Hebrews and the Tyrians, who were long ruled over by their native kings (2 Samuel 5:11; 1 Kings 5:1; 2 Chronicles 2:3).

Tyre consisted of two distinct parts, a rocky fortress on the mainland, called "Old Tyre," and the city, built on a small, rocky island about half-a-mile distant from the shore. It was a place of great strength. It was besieged by Shalmaneser, who was assisted by the Phoenicians of the mainland, for five years, and by Nebuchadnezzar (B.C. 586-573) for thirteen years, apparently without success. It afterwards fell under the power of Alexander the Great, after a siege of seven months, but continued to maintain much of its commercial importance till the Christian era. It is referred to in Matthew 11:21 and Acts 12:20. In A.D. 1291 it was taken by the Saracens, and has remained a desolate ruin ever since.

"The purple dye of Tyre had a worldwide celebrity on account of the durability of its beautiful tints, and its manufacture proved a source of abundant wealth to the inhabitants of that city."

Both Tyre and Sidon "were crowded with glass-shops, dyeing and weaving establishments; and among their cunning workmen not the least important class were those who were celebrated for the engraving of precious stones." (2 Chronicles 2:7, 14).

The wickedness and idolatry of this city are frequently denounced by the prophets, and its final destruction predicted (Isaiah 23:1; Jeremiah 25:22; Ezek. 26; 28:1-19; Amos 1:9, 10; Zechariah 9:2-4).

Here a church was founded soon after the death of Stephen, and Paul, on his return from his third missionary journey spent a week in intercourse with the disciples there (Acts 21:4). Here the scene at Miletus was repeated on his leaving them. They all, with their wives and children, accompanied him to the sea-shore. The sea-voyage of the apostle terminated at Ptolemais, about 38 miles from Tyre. Thence he proceeded to Caesarea (Acts 21:5-8).

"It is noticed on monuments as early as B.C. 1500, and claiming, according to Herodotus, to have been founded about B.C. 2700. It had two ports still existing, and was of commercial importance in all ages, with colonies at Carthage (about B.C. 850) and all over the Mediterranean. It was often attacked by Egypt and Assyria, and taken by Alexander the Great after a terrible siege in B.C. 332. It is now a town of 3,000 inhabitants, with ancient tombs and a ruined cathedral. A short Phoenician text of the fourth century B.C. is the only monument yet recovered."

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
1. (n.) Curdled milk.

2. (n. & v.) Attire. See Tire.

3. (v. i.) To prey. See Tire.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
LADDER OF TYRE

(He klimax (apo tes klimakos) Turou): Not mentioned in the Old Testament or the New Testament, but in Apocrypha (1 Maccabees 11:59), where it is said that Antiochus VI, after having confirmed Jonathan in the high-priesthood, appointed his brother Simon captain over the territory included between the Ladder of Tyre and the borders of Egypt. The Ladder has been located at different points on the coast between Tyre and Acre, such as the Ras el-`Abyadh ("Promontorium Album" of the ancient geographers), about 7 miles South of Tyre, and Ras en-Naqurah, about 6 miles farther South, and Ras el-Musheirifeh, a little farther on. These are capes jutting westward into the sea from the ridge which runs parallel to the general line of the coast. These capes project more than a mile into the sea, and present a very bold and precipitous front from 200 to 300 ft. in height. The ascent on either side of the promontory is very steep, and at Ras el-`Abyadh steps were cut in the white rock, which led to the identification of this point with the Ladder, but a reference to Josephus (B J, II, x, 2) leads to a different conclusion. He locates it 100 stadia North of Acre, which corresponds fairly well with the southern limit of the whole promontory, which is about 12 miles North of Acre, but not at all with Ras el-`Abyadh. The altitude of el Musheirifeh is greater than that of el-`Abyadh and may have had steps cut in it similar to the latter. It is more probable that the Ladder of Tyre was here, or at en-Naqurah, but the term applied to the whole promontory, which offered a serious obstacle to the passage of armies, or even caravans, since the approach is precipitous on either side, and at Ras el-`Abyadh the road skirts the edge of a sheer precipice, where a misstep would hurl one into the sea some 200 ft. below. The application of the term to the whole promontory seems to be indicated by Josephus, since he speaks of it as one of the mountains which encompass the plain of Ptolemais (Acre) and the highest of all. This would not be true of any one of the three capes mentioned, but would be if the hills behind, which form their base, were included. That it was designated as the Ladder of Tyre rather than of Acre was probably due to the fact that the promontory is nearer the former city (see Thomson, LB, II, edition 1882; SWP, name-lists, under the word).

H. Porter

TYRE

tir (tsowr. tsor, "rock" Turos, "Tyrus"; modern Sur):

1. Physical Features:

The most noted of the Phoenician cities situated on the coast, lat. 33? 17 minutes, about 20 miles South of Sidon and about 35 North of Carmel. The date of its foundation is uncertain, but it was later than that of Sidon. It is mentioned in the travels of the Egyptian Mohar, dating probably from the 14th century B.C., and in the Tell el-Amarna Letters of about the same period. Herodotus describes the temple of Hercules at Tyre and says it was built 2,300 years before his time, which would carry back the beginning of the city to more than 2700 B.C. It was a double city, one part on an island, a short distance from the shore, and the other on the mainland opposite. The island city had two harbors, connected by a canal, one looking North and the other South. The island was rocky and the city was fortitled on the land side by a wall 150 ft. high, the wall being of less elevation on the other sides. It was an exceedingly strong position, and is referred to in the Bible as the "strong" or "fortitled" city (Joshua 19:29). The space within the walls was crowded with buildings, and is said to have contained 40,000 inhabitants. The town on the mainland was situated in a plain extending from the Ras el-`Abyad, on the South to Sarepta on the North, a distance of about 20 miles. It was fertile and well watered, the river Leontes (Litany) passing through it to the sea, about 5 miles N. of Tyre, and the copious fountain of Ras el-`Ain, 3 miles to the South, furnishing an abundant supply both for the city and the gardens.

2. History:

(1) Tyre was for centuries subordinate to Sidon, but when the Philistines subdued the latter city, probably in the 12th century. (see SIDON), Tyre received an accession of inhabitants from the fugitives which gave it the pre-eminence. From this time dates its great commercial and colonial activity. Its mariners pushed boldly out to the West and founded colonies in Spain and North Africa, some of which, like Gades, Abdera and Carthage, became famous. They extended their commerce more widely than Sidon had ever done and ventured into the Atlantic and reached the coasts of Britain and West Africa. They reached out to the East also, and had their ships in the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, and their land routes threaded all Western Asia (see PHOENICIA). Tyre, like all the Phoenician cities, became subject to Egypt under Thothmes III in the first half of the 15th century B.C., and remained so for some 300 years, but it enjoyed practical autonomy under native kings, being only subject to tribute and to furnishing contingents of ships when the Egyptian kings made their expeditions to the North. In the Tell el-Amarna Letters, dating from the first half of the 14th century, we find a certain Abi-melek (or Abi-milki) writing from Tyre to the king of Egypt asking for aid against the Amorite leader, Aziru, and the king of Sidon, who had joined the rebels. The name is Phoenician, and we know that it was the policy of the Egyptian kings to leave the native dynasts on the throne.

(2) After the decline of Egypt, Tyre regained her independence and exercised the hegemony over most of the Phoenician towns, at least as far North as Gebal (Byblus), as appears in the control that Hiram had over the Lebanon forests in the time of David and Solomon. Hiram was evidently desirous of an alliance with Israel, since he sent messengers to David and furnished cedar and workmen to build him a house, apparently without solicitation. The friendly connection between the two kingdoms was advantageous to both, since David and Solomon needed the timber and the skilled artisans that Hiram could furnish, and Hiram needed the food products of the land of Israel (1 Kings 5). Tyre was at this time noted for the skill of its artificers, and its manufactured products were famous throughout the world (see PHOENICIA, 4). The purple dye and works in bronze were especially famous, and Hiram, the Tyrian artisan, was engaged by Solomon to cast the bronzes required for the temple (1 Kings 7:13). Hiram, the king, enlarged and beautified his capital. He united the two small islands on which the city was built by filling up the space between, where he made an open square and built a splendid temple to Melkarth and Astarte. He engaged in commercial enterprises with Solomon (1 Kings 9:26-28; 1 Kings 10:22), both in pursuance of the friendly alliance and also for the advantage of having the use of the port of Ezion-geber on the Red Sea. His brilliant reign lasted 43 years.

(3) The list of kings who succeeded him contains the names of Baal-azar, Abd-ashtoreth, murdered by his brothers, the eldest of whom succeeded him, followed by Astartus and Aserymus murdered by his brother, Pheles, who was overthrown by the high priest Eth-baal, showing how disturbed the period was. Eth-baal, or Ithobal, was the king who made an alliance with Ahab and gave him Jezebel, his daughter, in marriage, which proved most disastrous both to her and the country because of the introduction of the Baal-worship into Israel. Eth-baal was an energetic monarch, and is said to have rounded Botrys (Batrun). He reigned 32 years, and was followed by Badezor and Mattan, who gave his daughter, Elissa (Dido), in marriage to her uncle Sicharbas and transferred the throne to them; but they were set aside by an uprising of the people, and Pygmalion, son of Mattan, was placed on the throne, and Sicharbas put to death. Elissa fled with a party of nobles, by sea, to Africa and founded the city of Carthage. This happened about the middle of the 9th century B.C., Josephus putting it at 860 B.C.

(4) In the first half of this century Tyre became subject to Assyria, and her hegemony in Phoenicia came to an end, but her prosperity was not seriously checked as we may infer from Isaiah 23:8, which was written a century or so later. Assyria was satisfied with the payment of tribute until the time of Tiglath-pileser III (745-727), who laid a heavier hand upon her, and this led Elulaeus, king of Tyre, to form a confederacy of the Phoenician cities against Assyria. Shalmaneser IV subdued all except Tyre, which he distressed by cutting off her water-supply. But the people dug wells and obtained enough to subsist upon for five years, when Shalmaneser was killed and Elulaeus recovered control of his territory. He was not molested by Sargon, but Sennacherib advanced against him with 200,000 men, and Elulaeus fled to Cyprus. The citizens made a successful resistance and Sennacherib did not take Tyre, but it submitted to Esar-haddon, and its king, Baal, obtained the special favor of the Assyrian king, who made him ruler of all the coast cities from Dor to Gebal, and the Lebanon was placed under his control (680-673 B.C.). It is rather surprising that Baal refused to assist him in his attack upon Egypt and that Esar-haddon did not punish him, probably because he was too much occupied with Egypt. Ashur-banipal, however, did compel him to submit and to give him his daughter, and those of his brothers, as secondary wives, but left him as king of Tyre.

(5) On the decline of Assyria, Tyre regained its independence, and its greatness is indicated by the fact that it resisted Nebuchadnezzar 13 years (598-585); it is uncertain whether the island city was taken, but it evidently came to terms with the king of Babylon (compare Ezekiel 27:26; Josephus, Ant, X, xi, 1 and see The Expository Times, 1899, pp. 378, 430, 475, 520). After this siege Sidon took the lead and Tyre was in a disturbed state: the monarchy was overthrown and suffetes, or judges, took its place for six years, when the old order was restored. The decline of Babylon enabled Tyre to regain her independence for a short period until its submission to the Persians about 525 B.C., and thenceforth it was a vassal state during the continuance of the Persian empire.

(6) It was by no means hindered in its commercial prosperity, and its great strength is seen in the brave and energetic resistance it made to Alexander the Great. All Phoenicia submitted to him without resistance, and Tyre was willing to admit his suzerainty, but declined to receive him into the city. This so angered Alexander that he at once commenced a siege that proved the most difficult undertaking in all his wars. He had no fleet and was obliged to build a mole (causeway) from the mainland to the island, but before he could finish it the Tyrians destroyed it and beat back their assailants handily. Alexander had to do the work all over again, and since he was convinced that without a fleet he would not be able to take the city, he procured ships from the Phoenician towns that had submitted, and with the aid of these was able to blockade the port and prevent the besieged from issuing forth to destroy the new causeway. This was at length pushed up to the very wall of the city, which was finally breached, and the troops of Alexander forced their way in. But even then the defenders would not yield, and the king himself had to lead the assault upon them with his bodyguard and put them all to the sword. Those who died with arms in their hands were 8,000, and the survivors, women, children and slaves, to the number of 30,000, were sold in the open market. He placed over the ruined city, into which he introduced some colonists, a certain Abd-elonim, and left it after having spent about seven months in subduing it.

(7) After the death of Alexander, Tyre passed into the hands of Ptolemy Lagi, and when Antigonus, in 314 B.C., took Phoenicia from him, Tyre resisted, and he had to blockade it 15 months before it would yield, showing how quickly it had recovered from its previous disaster. It became a part of the Seleucid kingdom when Antiochus III drove the Ptolemies from Syria (198 B.C.), and the Seleucid kings regarded it of importance and gave it the right of asylum, and it was allowed the status of a free city by the Romans, Antony recognizing the magistrates and council of Tyre as allies. When the Parthians attacked and took Syria, in 40 B.C., Tyre would not submit and was left untouched, being too strong for them. Augustus deprived it of its freedom, but it was given the status of a "metropolis" by Hadrian, and this title appears on its coins.

(8) Tyre is mentioned in the New Testament several times: Christ visited its territory (Matthew 15:21 Mark 7:24), and people from there came to hear Him (Luke 6:17). Herod Agrippa I had trouble with Tyre, and a deputation came to visit him at Caesarea (Acts 12:20). Paul visited Tyre on his journey from Asia to Jerusalem (Acts 21:6-7).

Christianity was accepted by the people of Tyre, so that the 2nd century A.D. saw a bishopric established there, and in the 4th a council was held there to consider charges against Athanasius, by the party of Arius; he was condemned, a decision which brought the Tyrian church into disrepute. Tyre was already obnoxious to Christians because the anti-Christian philosopher Porphyry was from there. Tyre continued a commercial center, and Jerome says that it was the noblest and most beautiful of the Phoenician cities and an emporium of commerce for almost the whole world (Commentary on Ezekiel). It was of considerable importance in the Crusades and continued so until toward the end of the 13th century, when its trade declined, and it has now dwindled to a town of some 5,000 inhabitants. For "literature" see PHOENICIA.

H. Porter

TYRE, LADDER OF

(klimakos Turou): Given. in 1 Maccabees 11:59 as the northern limit of the territory placed under the authority of Simon Thassi the Maccabee by Antiochus VI (Theos), in the year 143 B.C. The statement of Josephus (B J, II, x, 2) that it was 100 furlongs North of Ptolemais, and a similar indication of position in the Jerusalem Talmud (Ab Zar 19) lead us to identify it with Ras-en-Naqurah and not with Ras-el-`Abyad (Promontorium Album of Pliny), as has been done. Here the rugged hills of Upper Galilee descend in bold precipices to the sea and leave no beach between. A natural barrier is thus formed which prevented the histories of Israel and Tyre from ever touching one another except in peaceful relations.

W. M. Christie

Greek
5184. Turos -- Tyre, a city of Phoenicia
... Tyre, a city of Phoenicia. Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine Transliteration: Turos
Phonetic Spelling: (too'-ros) Short Definition: Tyre Definition: Tyre, an ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/5184.htm - 6k

5183. Turios -- a Tyrian, an inhabitant of Tyre
... a Tyrian, an inhabitant of Tyre. Part of Speech: Noun, Masculine Transliteration:
Turios Phonetic Spelling: (too'-ree-os) Short Definition: an inhabitant of ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/5183.htm - 6k

4424. Ptolemais -- Ptolemais, a seaport south of Tyre
... Ptolemais, a seaport south of Tyre. Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine Transliteration:
Ptolemais Phonetic Spelling: (ptol-em-ah-is') Short Definition: Ptolemais ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/4424.htm - 6k

4947. Suria -- Syria, a region N. and East of Pal.
... NASB Word Usage Syria (8). Syria. Probably of Hebrew origin (Tsor); Syria (ie
Tsyria or Tyre), a region of Asia -- Syria. see HEBREW Tsor. ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/4947.htm - 6k

Strong's Hebrew
6876. Tsori -- inhab. of Tyre
... Tsori. 6877 . inhab. of Tyre. Transliteration: Tsori Phonetic Spelling: (tso-ree')
Short Definition: Tyrians. Word Origin from Tsor Definition inhab. ...
/hebrew/6876.htm - 6k

1575. Gammadim -- "men of valor," defenders of Tyre
... 1574, 1575. Gammadim. 1576 . "men of valor," defenders of Tyre. Transliteration:
Gammadim Phonetic Spelling: (gam-mawd') Short Definition: Gammadim. ...
/hebrew/1575.htm - 6k

6865. Tsor -- a Phoenician city
Tsor or Tsor. 6864, 6865. Tsor or Tsor. 6866 . a Phoenician city. Transliteration:
Tsor or Tsor Phonetic Spelling: (tsore) Short Definition: Tyre. ... Tyre, Tyrus ...
/hebrew/6865.htm - 6k

Library

The Council of Tyre.
... The ECCLESIASTICAL HistorY of Theodoret. Book I. Chapter XXVIII."The Council
of Tyre. Arsenius was a bishop of the Meletian faction. ...
/.../the ecclesiastical history of theodoret/chapter xxviii the council of tyre.htm

Why for the People of Tyre and Sidon, who Would have Believed, the ...
... A Treatise on the gift of perseverance, Chapter 23."Why for the People of Tyre and
Sidon, Who Would Have Believed, the Miracles Were Not Done Which Were Done ...
/.../augustine/anti-pelagian writings/chapter 23 why for the people.htm

The Council of Tyre and First Exile of Athanasius, 335-337.
... Prolegomena. Chapter I. Literature Section 5. The Council of Tyre and First
Exile of Athanasius, 335-337. Many of the bishops who ...
/.../athanasius/select works and letters or athanasius/section 5 the council of.htm

Council of Tyre; Illegal Deposition of St. Athanasius.
... Book II. Chapter XXV."Council of Tyre; Illegal Deposition of St. Athanasius.
The plots of the enemies of Athanasius involved him ...
/.../the ecclesiastical history of sozomenus/chapter xxv council of tyre illegal.htm

Concerning the Canaanitish Woman. Meaning of the "Borders of Tyre ...
... 16. Concerning the Canaanitish Woman. Meaning of the "Borders of Tyre and Sidon.".
"And Jesus went out thence and withdrew into the parts of Tyre and Sidon. ...
/.../16 concerning the canaanitish woman.htm

Divers Towns Called by the Name of Tyre.
... A Chorographical Century. Chapters 81-90 Chapter 89 Divers towns called by
the name of Tyre. Besides Tyre, the noble mart of Phoenicia ...
/.../lightfoot/from the talmud and hebraica/chapter 89 divers towns called.htm

Letter from the Emperor Constantine to the Synod of Tyre, and ...
... Book II. Chapter XXVIII."Letter from the Emperor Constantine to the Synod of Tyre,
and Exile of St. Athanasius through the Machination of the Arian Faction. ...
/.../chapter xxviii letter from the emperor.htm

Epistle of the Emperor Constantine to the Council of Tyre .
... Book I. Chapter XXVII."Epistle of the Emperor Constantine to the Council of Tyre .
"Constantinus Augustus to the holy council assembled in Tyre. ...
/.../chapter xxvii epistle of the emperor.htm

On the Words of the Gospel, Matt. xv. 21,"Jesus Went Out Thence ...
... On the words of the Gospel, Matt. xv. 21,"Jesus went out thence, and withdrew into
the parts of Tyre and Sidon. And behold, a Canaanitish woman," etc. [LXXVII. ...
/.../sermons on selected lessons of the new testament/sermon xxvii on the words.htm

On Account of the Charges against Athanasius, the Emperor Convokes ...
... SCHOLASTICUS. Book I. Chapter XXVIII."On Account of the Charges against Athanasius,
the Emperor convokes a Synod of Bishops at Tyre. The ...
/.../the ecclesiastical history of scholasticus/chapter xxviii on account of the.htm

Thesaurus
Tyre (59 Occurrences)
... Sidon was the oldest Phoenician city, but Tyre had a longer and more illustrious
history. The commerce of the whole world was gathered ...
/t/tyre.htm - 45k

Ladder (1 Occurrence)
... 2. (vi) That which resembles a ladder in form or use; hence, that by means of which
one attains to eminence. Int. Standard Bible Encyclopedia. LADDER OF TYRE. ...
/l/ladder.htm - 10k

Hiram (21 Occurrences)
... 5). (2.) Also "Huram" and "Horam," king of Tyre. ... churam). (1) A king of Tyre
who lived on most friendly terms with both David and Solomon. ...
/h/hiram.htm - 18k

Logs (12 Occurrences)
... Logs (12 Occurrences). 2 Samuel 5:11 Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David,
and cedar trees, and carpenters, and masons; and they built David a house. ...
/l/logs.htm - 9k

Cedar-trees (11 Occurrences)
... (ASV BBE WBS). 2 Samuel 5:11 And Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and
cedar-trees, and carpenters, and masons; and they built David a house. ...
/c/cedar-trees.htm - 9k

Arvad (2 Occurrences)
... Easton's Bible Dictionary Wandering, (Ezek. 27:8), a small island and city on the
coast of Syria, mentioned as furnishing mariners and soldiers for Tyre. ...
/a/arvad.htm - 11k

Sidon (35 Occurrences)
... for the war that took place about the middle of the 12th century BC, in which the
Philistines took and plundered Sidon, whose inhabitants fled to Tyre and gave ...
/s/sidon.htm - 25k

Zidon (25 Occurrences)
... Easton's Bible Dictionary A fishery, a town on the Mediterranean coast, about
25 miles north of Tyre. ... It was the mother city of Tyre. ...
/z/zidon.htm - 17k

Zarephath (4 Occurrences)
... for the refining and smelting of metals", a small Phoenician town, now Surafend,
about a mile from the coast, almost midway on the road between Tyre and Sidon. ...
/z/zarephath.htm - 11k

District (59 Occurrences)
... sick, (See NAS). Matthew 15:21 Jesus went out from there, and withdrew into
the region of Tyre and Sidon. (See NAS RSV). Matthew 15 ...
/d/district.htm - 24k

Concordance
Tyre (59 Occurrences)

Matthew 11:21
"Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon which were done in you, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 11:22
But I tell you, it will be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon on the day of judgment than for you.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 15:21
Jesus went out from there, and withdrew into the region of Tyre and Sidon.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 3:8
from Jerusalem, from Idumaea, beyond the Jordan, and those from around Tyre and Sidon. A great multitude, hearing what great things he did, came to him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 7:24
From there he arose, and went away into the borders of Tyre and Sidon. He entered into a house, and didn't want anyone to know it, but he couldn't escape notice.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 7:31
Again he departed from the borders of Tyre and Sidon, and came to the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the region of Decapolis.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 6:17
He came down with them, and stood on a level place, with a crowd of his disciples, and a great number of the people from all Judea and Jerusalem, and the sea coast of Tyre and Sidon, who came to hear him and to be healed of their diseases;
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 10:13
"Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon which were done in you, they would have repented long ago, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 10:14
But it will be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon in the judgment than for you.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 12:20
Now Herod was very angry with the people of Tyre and Sidon. They came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus, the king's personal aide, their friend, they asked for peace, because their country depended on the king's country for food.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE WBS NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 21:3
When we had come in sight of Cyprus, leaving it on the left hand, we sailed to Syria, and landed at Tyre, for there the ship was to unload her cargo.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 21:4
Having searched for the disciples and found them, we stayed at Tyre for seven days; and, taught by the Spirit, they repeatedly urged Paul not to proceed to Jerusalem.
(WEY)

Acts 21:7
When we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolemais. We greeted the brothers, and stayed with them one day.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Joshua 19:29
The border turned to Ramah, to the fortified city of Tyre; and the border turned to Hosah. It ended at the sea by the region of Achzib;
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

2 Samuel 5:11
Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, and carpenters, and masons; and they built David a house.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

2 Samuel 24:7
and came to the stronghold of Tyre, and to all the cities of the Hivites, and of the Canaanites; and they went out to the south of Judah, at Beersheba.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Kings 5:1
Hiram king of Tyre sent his servants to Solomon; for he had heard that they had anointed him king in the room of his father: for Hiram was ever a lover of David.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Kings 7:13
King Solomon sent and fetched Hiram out of Tyre.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Kings 7:14
He was the son of a widow of the tribe of Naphtali, and his father was a man of Tyre, a worker in brass; and he was filled with wisdom and understanding and skill, to work all works in brass. He came to king Solomon, and performed all his work.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Kings 9:11
(now Hiram the king of Tyre had furnished Solomon with cedar trees and fir trees, and with gold, according to all his desire), that then king Solomon gave Hiram twenty cities in the land of Galilee.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Kings 9:12
Hiram came out from Tyre to see the cities which Solomon had given him; and they didn't please him.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Chronicles 14:1
Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, and masons, and carpenters, to build him a house.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

1 Chronicles 22:4
and cedar trees without number: for the Sidonians and they of Tyre brought cedar trees in abundance to David.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS)

2 Chronicles 2:3
Solomon sent to Huram the king of Tyre, saying, As you dealt with David my father, and sent him cedars to build him a house in which to dwell, even so deal with me.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

2 Chronicles 2:11
Then Huram the king of Tyre answered in writing, which he sent to Solomon, "Because Yahweh loves his people, he has made you king over them."
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

2 Chronicles 2:14
the son of a woman of the daughters of Dan; and his father was a man of Tyre, skillful to work in gold, and in silver, in brass, in iron, in stone, and in timber, in purple, in blue, and in fine linen, and in crimson, also to engrave any manner of engraving, and to devise any device; that there may be a place appointed to him with your skillful men, and with the skillful men of my lord David your father.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT RSV NIV)

Ezra 3:7
They gave money also to the masons, and to the carpenters; and food, and drink, and oil, to them of Sidon, and to them of Tyre, to bring cedar trees from Lebanon to the sea, to Joppa, according to the grant that they had of Cyrus king of Persia.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE WBS NIV)

Nehemiah 13:16
There lived men of Tyre also therein, who brought in fish, and all manner of wares, and sold on the Sabbath to the children of Judah, and in Jerusalem.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS NAS RSV NIV)

Psalms 45:12
The daughter of Tyre comes with a gift. The rich among the people entreat your favor.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Psalms 83:7
Gebal, Ammon, and Amalek; Philistia with the inhabitants of Tyre;
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Psalms 87:4
I will record Rahab and Babylon among those who acknowledge me. Behold, Philistia, Tyre, and also Ethiopia: "This one was born there."
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Isaiah 23:1
The burden of Tyre. Howl, you ships of Tarshish! For it is laid waste, so that there is no house, no entering in. From the land of Kittim it is revealed to them.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Isaiah 23:3
Who get in the seed of Shihor, whose wealth is the trade of the nations.
(See NIV)

Isaiah 23:5
When the report comes to Egypt, they will be in anguish at the report of Tyre.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Isaiah 23:8
Who has planned this against Tyre, the giver of crowns, whose merchants are princes, whose traffickers are the honorable of the earth?
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Isaiah 23:13
...
(See RSV)

Isaiah 23:15
It will come to pass in that day that Tyre will be forgotten seventy years, according to the days of one king. After the end of seventy years it will be to Tyre like in the song of the prostitute.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Isaiah 23:17
It will happen after the end of seventy years that Yahweh will visit Tyre, and she shall return to her wages, and will play the prostitute with all the kingdoms of the world on the surface of the earth.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Jeremiah 25:22
and all the kings of Tyre, and all the kings of Sidon, and the kings of the isle which is beyond the sea;
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Jeremiah 27:3
and send them to the king of Edom, and to the king of Moab, and to the king of the children of Ammon, and to the king of Tyre, and to the king of Sidon, by the hand of the messengers who come to Jerusalem to Zedekiah king of Judah;
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Jeremiah 47:4
because of the day that comes to destroy all the Philistines, to cut off from Tyre and Sidon every helper who remains: for Yahweh will destroy the Philistines, the remnant of the isle of Caphtor.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 26:2
Son of man, because Tyre has said against Jerusalem, Aha, she is broken: the gate of the peoples; she is turned to me; I shall be replenished, now that she is laid waste:
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 26:3
therefore thus says the Lord Yahweh, Behold, I am against you, Tyre, and will cause many nations to come up against you, as the sea causes its waves to come up.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 26:4
They shall destroy the walls of Tyre, and break down her towers: I will also scrape her dust from her, and make her a bare rock.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 26:7
For thus says the Lord Yahweh: Behold, I will bring on Tyre Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, king of kings, from the north, with horses, and with chariots, and with horsemen, and a company, and much people.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 26:15
Thus says the Lord Yahweh to Tyre: shall not the islands shake at the sound of your fall, when the wounded groan, when the slaughter is made in the midst of you?
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 27:2
You, son of man, take up a lamentation over Tyre;
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 27:3
and tell Tyre, you who dwell at the entry of the sea, who are the merchant of the peoples to many islands, thus says the Lord Yahweh: You, Tyre, have said, I am perfect in beauty.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 27:8
The inhabitants of Sidon and Arvad were your rowers: your wise men, Tyre, were in you, they were your pilots.
(WEB JPS ASV DBY WBS YLT NAS NIV)

Ezekiel 27:32
In their wailing they shall take up a lamentation for you, and lament over you, saying, Who is there like Tyre, like her who is brought to silence in the midst of the sea?
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 28:2
Son of man, tell the prince of Tyre, Thus says the Lord Yahweh: Because your heart is lifted up, and you have said, I am a god, I sit in the seat of God, in the midst of the seas; yet you are man, and not God, though you did set your heart as the heart of God-
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 28:12
Son of man, take up a lamentation over the king of Tyre, and tell him, Thus says the Lord Yahweh: You seal up the sum, full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Ezekiel 29:18
Son of man, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon caused his army to serve a great service against Tyre: every head was made bald, and every shoulder was worn; yet had he no wages, nor his army, from Tyre, for the service that he had served against it.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Hosea 9:13
I have seen Ephraim, like Tyre, planted in a pleasant place; but Ephraim will bring out his children to the murderer.
(WEB JPS ASV DBY WBS NAS NIV)

Joel 3:4
"Yes, and what are you to me, Tyre, and Sidon, and all the regions of Philistia? Will you repay me? And if you repay me, I will swiftly and speedily return your repayment on your own head.
(WEB KJV JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Amos 1:9
Thus says Yahweh: "For three transgressions of Tyre, yes, for four, I will not turn away its punishment; because they delivered up the whole community to Edom, and didn't remember the brotherly covenant;
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Amos 1:10
but I will send a fire on the wall of Tyre, and it will devour its palaces."
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Zechariah 9:2
and Hamath, also, which borders on it; Tyre and Sidon, because they are very wise.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Zechariah 9:3
Tyre built herself a stronghold, and heaped up silver like the dust, and fine gold like the mire of the streets.
(WEB JPS ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Subtopics

Tyre

Tyre or Tyrus

Tyre: Antiquity of

Tyre: Called: The Crowning City

Tyre: Called: The Daughter of Tarshish

Tyre: Called: The Daughter of Zidon

Tyre: Called: The Joyous City

Tyre: Called: The Renowned City

Tyre: Celebrated For: Its Beauty

Tyre: Celebrated For: Its Commerce

Tyre: Celebrated For: Its Wealth

Tyre: Celebrated For: Strength and Beauty of Its Ships

Tyre: Christ was Followed by Many From

Tyre: Christ: Alluded to the Depravity of

Tyre: Christ: Depended for Provision Upon Galilee

Tyre: Christ: Paul Found Disciples At

Tyre: Christ: Visited the Coasts of

Tyre: City of Antiquity of

Tyre: City of Besieged by Nebuchadnezzar

Tyre: City of Commerce of

Tyre: City of Fortified

Tyre: City of Heals the Daughter of the Non-Jewish, Syrophenician Woman Near

Tyre: City of Jesus Goes to the Coasts of

Tyre: City of Merchants of

Tyre: City of Multitudes From, Come to Hear Jesus, and to be Healed of Their Diseases

Tyre: City of On the Northern Boundary of the Tribe of Asher

Tyre: City of Paul Visits

Tyre: City of Pleasant Site of

Tyre: City of Prophecies Relating To

Tyre: City of Riches of

Tyre: City of The Hostility of Herod Agrippa I Toward

Tyre: City of To be Judged According to Its Opportunity and Privileges

Tyre: David and Solomon Formed Alliances With

Tyre: Governed by Kings

Tyre: Inhabitants of Mercantile Men

Tyre: Inhabitants of Proud and Haughty

Tyre: Inhabitants of Sea-Faring Men

Tyre: Inhabitants of Self-Conceited

Tyre: Inhabitants of Superstitious

Tyre: Inhabitants of Wicked

Tyre: Insular Position of

Tyre: Kingdom of Hiram, King of

Tyre: Kingdom of Men and Materials Sent From, to Solomon, for the Erection of the Temple and his Castles

Tyre: Kingdom of Sends Material to David for his Palace

Tyre: Often Confederated Against the Jews and Rejoiced in Their

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: All Nations to be Terrified at Its Destruction

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: Envy Against the Jews a Cause of Its Destruction

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: Inhabitants of, to Emigrated to Other Countries

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: Its Inhabitants to be Sold As Slaves, As a Recompence For

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: Its Restoration to Commercial Greatness After Seventy Years

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: Its Second Destruction by the Macedonians

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: Never to Recover Its Greatness

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: Pride a Cause of Its Destruction

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: The King of Babylon to be Rewarded With the Spoil of Egypt

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: The Ruins of the First City to be Employed in Making A

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: To be Destroyed by the King of Babylon

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: To be Scraped As the Top of a Rock, and to be a Place For

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: To Lie Waste and be Forgotten for Seventy Years

Tyre: Prophecies Respecting: To Participated in the Blessings of the Gospel

Tyre: Propitiated the Favour of Herod

Tyre: Soldiers of, Supplied by Persia

Tyre: Strongly Fortified

Tyre: Supplied: A Master-Builder for the Temple

Tyre: Supplied: Seamen for Solomon's Navy

Tyre: Supplied: Stones and Timber for Building the Temple

Tyre: Supplied: Timber for Rebuilding the Temple and City

Tyre: The Jews Condemned for Purchasing from the People of, on The

Related Terms

Ladder (1 Occurrence)

Hiram (21 Occurrences)

Logs (12 Occurrences)

Cedar-trees (11 Occurrences)

Arvad (2 Occurrences)

Sidon (35 Occurrences)

Zidon (25 Occurrences)

Zarephath (4 Occurrences)

District (59 Occurrences)

Phenicia (1 Occurrence)

Timber (32 Occurrences)

Brotherly (8 Occurrences)

Commerce (3 Occurrences)

Ocina

Woodworkers (6 Occurrences)

Masons (8 Occurrences)

Philistia (12 Occurrences)

Blastus (1 Occurrence)

Cedars (37 Occurrences)

Carpenters (11 Occurrences)

Ashes (44 Occurrences)

Arvadites (1 Occurrence)

Stoneworkers (3 Occurrences)

Baal (94 Occurrences)

Gateway (40 Occurrences)

Isle (15 Occurrences)

Coasts (58 Occurrences)

Islands (32 Occurrences)

Ahab (85 Occurrences)

Island (16 Occurrences)

Repented (49 Occurrences)

Nebuchadrez'zar (31 Occurrences)

Siege (63 Occurrences)

Ramah (38 Occurrences)

Cedar (61 Occurrences)

Lamentation (45 Occurrences)

Region (96 Occurrences)

Trade (33 Occurrences)

Money (284 Occurrences)

Wages (52 Occurrences)

Vicinity (18 Occurrences)

Voyage (5 Occurrences)

Korazin (2 Occurrences)

Kanah (3 Occurrences)

Neighbourhood (9 Occurrences)

Judging (141 Occurrences)

Judgement (68 Occurrences)

Landed (10 Occurrences)

League (20 Occurrences)

Walled (63 Occurrences)

Friendly (17 Occurrences)

Tin (6 Occurrences)

Traffic (12 Occurrences)

Thence (152 Occurrences)

Trafficker (3 Occurrences)

Tolerable (6 Occurrences)

Raama (1 Occurrence)

Raw (10 Occurrences)

Rubbed (10 Occurrences)

Era

Eden (19 Occurrences)

Esarhaddon (3 Occurrences)

Ebony (2 Occurrences)

Envoys (16 Occurrences)

Endurable (5 Occurrences)

Skilled (44 Occurrences)

Miracles (65 Occurrences)

Misrephothmaim (2 Occurrences)

Misrephoth-maim (2 Occurrences)

Mighty (514 Occurrences)

Minnith (2 Occurrences)

Merchant (15 Occurrences)

Performed (110 Occurrences)

Woe (102 Occurrences)

Bench (1 Occurrence)

Bald (12 Occurrences)

Borders (104 Occurrences)

Cedar-wood (22 Occurrences)

Cabul (2 Occurrences)

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