Acts 26:28
New International Version
Then Agrippa said to Paul, "Do you think that in such a short time you can persuade me to be a Christian?"

New Living Translation
Agrippa interrupted him. "Do you think you can persuade me to become a Christian so quickly?"

English Standard Version
And Agrippa said to Paul, “In a short time would you persuade me to be a Christian?”

Berean Study Bible
Then Agrippa said to Paul, “Can you persuade me in such a short time to become a Christian?”

Berean Literal Bible
Then Agrippa said to Paul, "Within so little time do you persuade me to become a Christian?"

New American Standard Bible
Agrippa replied to Paul, "In a short time you will persuade me to become a Christian."

King James Bible
Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.

Christian Standard Bible
Agrippa said to Paul, "Are you going to persuade me to become a Christian so easily?"

Contemporary English Version
Agrippa asked Paul, "In such a short time do you think you can talk me into being a Christian?"

Good News Translation
Agrippa said to Paul, "In this short time do you think you will make me a Christian?"

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then Agrippa said to Paul, "Are you going to persuade me to become a Christian so easily?""

International Standard Version
Agrippa asked Paul, "Can you so quickly persuade me to become a Christian?"

NET Bible
Agrippa said to Paul, "In such a short time are you persuading me to become a Christian?"

New Heart English Bible
Agrippa said to Paul, "With a little persuasion are you trying to make me a Christian?"

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Agrippa said to him, “In a little bit you will persuade me to become a Christian.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Agrippa said to Paul, "Do you think you can quickly persuade me to become a Christian?"

New American Standard 1977
And Agrippa replied to Paul, “In a short time you will persuade me to become a Christian.”

Jubilee Bible 2000
Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.

King James 2000 Bible
Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost you persuade me to be a Christian.

American King James Version
Then Agrippa said to Paul, Almost you persuade me to be a Christian.

American Standard Version
And Agrippa'said unto Paul, With but little persuasion thou wouldest fain make me a Christian.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And Agrippa said to Paul: In a little thou persuadest me to become a Christian.

Darby Bible Translation
And Agrippa [said] to Paul, In a little thou persuadest me to become a Christian.

English Revised Version
And Agrippa said unto Paul, With but little persuasion thou wouldest fain make me a Christian.

Webster's Bible Translation
Then Agrippa said to Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.

Weymouth New Testament
Agrippa answered, "In brief, you are doing your best to persuade me to become a Christian."

World English Bible
Agrippa said to Paul, "With a little persuasion are you trying to make me a Christian?"

Young's Literal Translation
And Agrippa said unto Paul, 'In a little thou dost persuade me to become a Christian!'
Study Bible
Festus Interrupts Paul's Defense
27King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know you do.” 28Then Agrippa said to Paul, “Can you persuade me in such a short time to become a Christian?” 29“Short time or long,” Paul replied, “I wish to God that not only you but all who hear me this day may become what I am, except for these chains.”…
Cross References
Acts 11:26
and when he found him, he brought him back to Antioch. So for a full year they met together with the church and taught large numbers of people. The disciples were first called Christians at Antioch.

Acts 26:27
King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know you do."

Treasury of Scripture

Then Agrippa said to Paul, Almost you persuade me to be a Christian.

Almost.

Acts 26:29
And Paul said, I would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds.

Acts 24:25
And as he reasoned of righteousness, temperance, and judgment to come, Felix trembled, and answered, Go thy way for this time; when I have a convenient season, I will call for thee.

Ezekiel 33:31
And they come unto thee as the people cometh, and they sit before thee as my people, and they hear thy words, but they will not do them: for with their mouth they shew much love, but their heart goeth after their covetousness.







Lexicon
Then
δὲ (de)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1161: A primary particle; but, and, etc.

Agrippa
Ἀγρίππας (Agrippas)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 67: Agrippa, i.e. Herod Agrippa II. Apparently from agrios and hippos; wild-horse tamer; Agrippas, one of the Herods.

[said] to
πρὸς (pros)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 4314: To, towards, with. A strengthened form of pro; a preposition of direction; forward to, i.e. Toward.

Paul,
Παῦλον (Paulon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3972: Paul, Paulus. Of Latin origin; Paulus, the name of a Roman and of an apostle.

“Can you persuade
πείθεις (peitheis)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 3982: A primary verb; to convince; by analogy, to pacify or conciliate; reflexively or passively, to assent, to rely.

me
με (me)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Accusative 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

in
Ἐν (En)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

such a short [time]
ὀλίγῳ (oligō)
Adjective - Dative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 3641: Puny; especially neuter somewhat.

to become
ποιῆσαι (poiēsai)
Verb - Aorist Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 4160: (a) I make, manufacture, construct, (b) I do, act, cause. Apparently a prolonged form of an obsolete primary; to make or do.

a Christian?”
Χριστιανὸν (Christianon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 5546: A Christian. From Christos; a Christian, i.e. Follower of Christ.
(28) Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.--At the cost of giving up a familiar and impressive text, it must be admitted that the Greek words cannot possibly bear the meaning which is thus put upon them. The words run literally, In, or with, a little thou persuadest me; and this may be completed by, "with little speech," "with little labour," or "little evidence." So in Ephesians 3:3 we have precisely the same phrase rendered "in few words." Agrippa's words, accordingly, are the expression, not of a half-belief, but of a cynical sneer. Thou art trying to make a Christian of me with very few words, on very slender grounds, would be the nearest paraphrase of his derisive answer to St. Paul's appeal. It was. it will be seen, evasive as well as derisive; he shrinks from a direct answer to the question that had been put to him. In his use of the Latin term "Christian" (see Note on Acts 11:26) we may trace, perhaps, the effect of Roman associations. There certainly were Christian communities at Rome at this time (Romans 16 passim), and they would naturally be described there as they had been at Antioch. It may be noted that, of the prominent English versions, Wiclif gives "in a little thing," Tyndal and Cranmer "somewhat," the Rhemish "a little;" the Geneva agrees with the present version in "almost." The meaning "somewhat," or "a little," is a tenable one. but Ephesians 3:3. as already stated, is in favour of that given above. The phrase was, perhaps, in itself ambiguous, and St. Paul accepts in one sense what had been spoken in another.

Verse 28. - And for then, A.V.; with but little persuasion thou wouldest fain make me a Christian for almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian, A.V. With but little persuasion (ἐν ὀλίγῳ κ.τ.λ.). This saying of Agrippa's is obscure and variously explained. The A.V., following Chrysostom, Beza, Luther, etc., takes ἐν ὀλίγῳ to mean "within a little" or" almost," like the Hebrew כִּמְעַט, which is very suitable to the context. The corresponding ἐν πόλλῳ, or, as otherwise read, ἐν μεγάλῳ would then mean, as in the A.V., "altogether," and the sense of the whole passage is striking and appropriate. But there is some difficulty in getting Otis meaning out of the words. The natural way of expressing it would be παρ ὀλίγον, or ὀλίγου, or ὀλίγον δεῖ. Hence many other commentators take ἐν ὀλίγῳ to mean "in a short time," and the sense to be either "you are making short work of my conversion: you are persuading me to become a Christian as suddenly as you yourself did;" with a corresponding sense for ἐν πόλλῳ, "in a long time," i.e. whether it takes a short or a long time, I pray God you may become a Christian like myself;" or, "you are soon persuading me," you will soon persuade me if you go on any longer in this strain. Others, again, preferring the reading ἐν μεγάλῳ in ver. 29, take ἐν ὀλίγῳ to mean "with little trouble," or "with few words," as Ephesians 3:5 (understanding λόγῳ or πόνῳ), "lightly" (Alford), and then the opposite ἐν μεγάλῳ would mean "with much trouble," "with many words," i.e. "with difficulty." But this is rather a fiat rendering. Another difference of opinion is whether the words of Agrippa are to be taken ironically, or sarcastically, or jestingly, or whether they are to be taken seriously, as the words of a man shaken in his convictions and seriously impressed by what he had heard. The whole turn of the narrative seems to favor the latter view. Another view, started by Chrysostom, is that Agrippa used the words in one sense, and St. Paul (mistakenly or advisedly) took them in another. Another possible explanation is that ἐν ὀλίγῳ is here used in the sense in which Thucydides employs the phrase (it. 86 and Ephesians 4:26), Τὴν ἐν ὀλίγῳ ναυμάχιαν and Ἐν ὀλίγῳ στρατοπεδευομένος, viz. "in a narrow place;" and that Agrippa meant to say, "By your appeal to the prophets you press me hard; you have got me into a corner. I am in a στενοχωρία, a ' narrow room; ' I hardly know how to get out of it." The ἐν μεγάλῳ would then mean a" large room," a εὐρυχωρία (Psalm 30:8). This would suppose ἐν ὀλίγῳ and ἐν μεγάλῳ to have become proverbial phrases. 26:24-32 It becomes us, on all occasions, to speak the words of truth and soberness, and then we need not be troubled at the unjust censures of men. Active and laborious followers of the gospel often have been despised as dreamers or madmen, for believing such doctrines and such wonderful facts; and for attesting that the same faith and diligence, and an experience like their own, are necessary to all men, whatever their rank, in order to their salvation. But apostles and prophets, and the Son of God himself, were exposed to this charge; and none need be moved thereby, when Divine grace has made them wise unto salvation. Agrippa saw a great deal of reason for Christianity. His understanding and judgment were for the time convinced, but his heart was not changed. And his conduct and temper were widely different from the humility and spirituality of the gospel. Many are almost persuaded to be religious, who are not quite persuaded; they are under strong convictions of their duty, and of the excellence of the ways of God, yet do not pursue their convictions. Paul urged that it was the concern of every one to become a true Christian; that there is grace enough in Christ for all. He expressed his full conviction of the truth of the gospel, the absolute necessity of faith in Christ in order to salvation. Such salvation from such bondage, the gospel of Christ offers to the Gentiles; to a lost world. Yet it is with much difficulty that any person can be persuaded he needs a work of grace on his heart, like that which was needful for the conversion of the Gentiles. Let us beware of fatal hesitation in our own conduct; and recollect how far the being almost persuaded to be a Christian, is from being altogether such a one as every true believer is.
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