2 Kings 8:15
New International Version
But the next day he took a thick cloth, soaked it in water and spread it over the king's face, so that he died. Then Hazael succeeded him as king.

New Living Translation
But the next day Hazael took a blanket, soaked it in water, and held it over the king's face until he died. Then Hazael became the next king of Aram.

English Standard Version
But the next day he took the bed cloth and dipped it in water and spread it over his face, till he died. And Hazael became king in his place.

Berean Study Bible
But the next day Hazael took a thick cloth, dipped it in water, and spread it over the king’s face. So Ben-hadad died, and Hazael reigned in his place.

New American Standard Bible
On the following day, he took the cover and dipped it in water and spread it on his face, so that he died. And Hazael became king in his place.

King James Bible
And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took a thick cloth, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died: and Hazael reigned in his stead.

Christian Standard Bible
The next day Hazael took a heavy cloth, dipped it in water, and spread it over the king's face. Ben-hadad died, and Hazael reigned in his place.

Contemporary English Version
But the very next day, Hazael got a thick blanket; he soaked it in water and held it over Benhadad's face until he died. Hazael then became king.

Good News Translation
But on the following day Hazael took a blanket, soaked it in water, and smothered the king. And Hazael succeeded Benhadad as king of Syria.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The next day Hazael took a heavy cloth, dipped it in water, and spread it over the king's face. Ben-hadad died, and Hazael reigned instead of him.

International Standard Version
But the very next day, Hazael grabbed a thick covering, soaked it in water, and spread it over the king's face, and he suffocated. Then Hazael succeeded Ben-hadad as king.

NET Bible
The next day Hazael took a piece of cloth, dipped it in water, and spread it over Ben Hadad's face until he died. Then Hazael replaced him as king.

New Heart English Bible
It happened on the next day, that he took a thick cloth, dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died. Then Hazael reigned in his place.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
But the next day Hazael took a blanket, soaked it in water, and smothered the king with it. Hazael ruled as king in his place.

JPS Tanakh 1917
And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took the coverlet, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died; and Hazael reigned in his stead.

New American Standard 1977
And it came about on the morrow, that he took the cover and dipped it in water and spread it on his face, so that he died. And Hazael became king in his place.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And it came to pass on the next day that he took a thick cloth and dipped it in water and spread it on his face so that he died; and Hazael reigned in his stead.

King James 2000 Bible
And it came to pass on the next day, that he took a thick cloth, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died: and Hazael reigned in his stead.

American King James Version
And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took a thick cloth, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died: and Hazael reigned in his stead.

American Standard Version
And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took the coverlet, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died: and Hazael reigned in his stead.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
And it came to pass on the next day that he took a thick cloth, and dipped it in water, and put it on his face, and he died: and Azael reigned in his stead.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And on the next day he took a blanket, and pouted water on it, and spread it upon his face: and he died, and Hazael reigned in his stead.

Darby Bible Translation
And it came to pass the next day, that he took the coverlet and dipped [it] in water, and spread it over his face, so that he died; and Hazael reigned in his stead.

English Revised Version
And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took the coverlet, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, So that he died: and Hazael reigned in his stead.

Webster's Bible Translation
And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took a thick cloth, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died: and Hazael reigned in his stead.

World English Bible
It happened on the next day, that he took a thick cloth, dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died. Then Hazael reigned in his place.

Young's Literal Translation
And it cometh to pass on the morrow, that he taketh the coarse cloth, and dippeth in water, and spreadeth on his face, and he dieth, and Hazael reigneth in his stead.
Study Bible
Hazael Murders Ben-hadad
14So Hazael left Elisha and went to his master, who asked him, “What did Elisha say to you?” And he replied, “He told me you would surely recover.” 15But the next day Hazael took a thick cloth, dipped it in water, and spread it over the king’s face. So Ben-hadad died, and Hazael reigned in his place.
Cross References
2 Kings 8:10
Elisha answered, "Go and say to him, 'You will surely recover.' But the LORD has shown me that in fact he will die."

2 Kings 8:28
Then Ahaziah went with Joram son of Ahab to fight against Hazael king of Aram at Ramoth-gilead, and the Arameans wounded Joram.

Treasury of Scripture

And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took a thick cloth, and dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died: and Hazael reigned in his stead.

And it came

2 Kings 8:13
And Hazael said, But what, is thy servant a dog, that he should do this great thing? And Elisha answered, The LORD hath shewed me that thou shalt be king over Syria.

1 Samuel 16:12,13
And he sent, and brought him in. Now he was ruddy, and withal of a beautiful countenance, and goodly to look to. And the LORD said, Arise, anoint him: for this is he…

1 Samuel 24:4-7,13
And the men of David said unto him, Behold the day of which the LORD said unto thee, Behold, I will deliver thine enemy into thine hand, that thou mayest do to him as it shall seem good unto thee. Then David arose, and cut off the skirt of Saul's robe privily…

on the morrow

Psalm 36:4
He deviseth mischief upon his bed; he setteth himself in a way that is not good; he abhorreth not evil.

Micah 2:1
Woe to them that devise iniquity, and work evil upon their beds! when the morning is light, they practise it, because it is in the power of their hand.

that he took a thick cloth

1 Samuel 19:13
And Michal took an image, and laid it in the bed, and put a pillow of goats' hair for his bolster, and covered it with a cloth.

so that he died

2 Kings 9:24
And Jehu drew a bow with his full strength, and smote Jehoram between his arms, and the arrow went out at his heart, and he sunk down in his chariot.

2 Kings 15:10-14,25,30
And Shallum the son of Jabesh conspired against him, and smote him before the people, and slew him, and reigned in his stead…

1 Kings 15:28
Even in the third year of Asa king of Judah did Baasha slay him, and reigned in his stead.

Hazael

2 Kings 8:13
And Hazael said, But what, is thy servant a dog, that he should do this great thing? And Elisha answered, The LORD hath shewed me that thou shalt be king over Syria.

1 Kings 19:15
And the LORD said unto him, Go, return on thy way to the wilderness of Damascus: and when thou comest, anoint Hazael to be king over Syria:







Lexicon
But
וַיְהִ֣י (way·hî)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

the next day
מִֽמָּחֳרָ֗ת (mim·mā·ḥo·rāṯ)
Preposition-m | Noun - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 4283: The morrow, tomorrow

Hazael took
וַיִּקַּ֤ח (way·yiq·qaḥ)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3947: To take

a thick cloth,
הַמַּכְבֵּר֙ (ham·maḵ·bêr)
Article | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 4346: Grating, lattice-work

dipped
וַיִּטְבֹּ֣ל (way·yiṭ·bōl)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 2881: To dip, to immerse

it in water,
בַּמַּ֔יִם (bam·ma·yim)
Preposition-b, Article | Noun - masculine plural
Strong's Hebrew 4325: Water, juice, urine, semen

and spread
וַיִּפְרֹ֥שׂ (way·yip̄·rōś)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 6566: To break apart, disperse

it over
עַל־ (‘al-)
Preposition
Strong's Hebrew 5921: Above, over, upon, against

the king’s face.
פָּנָ֖יו (pā·nāw)
Noun - common plural construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 6440: The face

So Ben-hadad died,
וַיָּמֹ֑ת (way·yā·mōṯ)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 4191: To die, to kill

and Hazael
חֲזָהאֵ֖ל (ḥă·zā·h·’êl)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 2371: Hazael -- 'God sees', a king of Aram (Syria)

reigned
וַיִּמְלֹ֥ךְ (way·yim·lōḵ)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 4427: To reign, inceptively, to ascend the throne, to induct into royalty, to take counsel

in his place.
תַּחְתָּֽיו׃ (taḥ·tāw)
Preposition | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 8478: The bottom, below, in lieu of
(15) He took--i.e., Hazael, the nearest subject. Ewald objects that if Hazael were meant, his name would not occur where it does at the end of the verse. But the objection does not hold, for in relating who succeeded to the throne, it was natural to give the name of the new king. Further, a considerable pause must be understood at "he died." The Judaean editor of Kings then appropriately concludes: "So Hazael reigned in his stead." The mention of the name significantly reminds us that Elisha had designated Hazael as the future king. Besides, after the words "and he died," it would have been more ambiguous than usual to add, "and he reigned in his stead."

A thick cloth.--Rather, the quilt, or coverlet. So the LXX., Vulg., Targum, and Arabic. The Syriac renders "curtain;" and, accordingly, Gesenius and others translate, "mosquito net." The Hebrew term (makb?r) means, etymologically, something plaited or interwoven. It is not found elsewhere, but a word of the same root occurs in 1Samuel 19:13. It is clear from the context that the makb?r must have been something which when soaked in water, and laid on the face, would prevent respiration.

Josephus says Hazael strangled his master with a mosquito net. But this and other explanations, such as that of Ewald, do not suit the words of the text. The old commentator, Clericus, may be right when he states Hazae?s motive to have been ut hominem facilius suffocaret, ne vi interemptus videretur. And, perhaps, as Thenius supposes, the crown was offered to Hazael as a successful warrior. (Comp. 2Kings 10:32, seq.) When Duncker (Hist. of Antiq., 1:413) ventures to state that Elisha incited Hazael to the murder of Ben-hadad, and afterwards renewed the war against Israel, not without encouragement from the prophet as a persistent enemy of Jehoram and his dynasty, he simply betrays an utter incapacity for understanding the character and function of Hebrew prophecy. The writer of Kings, at all events, did not intend to represent Elisha as a deceiver of foreign sovereigns and a traitor to his own; and this narrative is the only surviving record of the events described.

Hazael reigned in his stead.--On the Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser II. (B.C. 860-825), now in the British Museum, we read: "In my 18th regnal year for the 16th time I crossed the Euphrates. Haza'ilu of the land of Damascus came on to the battle: 1,121 of his chariots, 470 of his horsemen, with his stores, I took from him." And again: "In my 21st year for the 21st time I crossed the Euphrates: to the cities of Haza'ilu of the land of Damascus I marched, whose towns I took. Tribute of the land of the Tyrians, Sidonians, Giblites, I received."

Verse 15. - And it came to pass on the morrow, that he took a thick cloth. Macber is a cloth of a coarse texture - a mat, or piece of carpeting. It has here the article prefixed to it (ham-macber), which implies that there was but one in the sick-room. We may conjecture that it was a mat used as a sort of pillow, and interposed between the head-rest (so common in Egypt and Assyria) and the head (compare the c'bir of 1 Samuel 19:13). And dipped it in water. The water would fill up the interstices through which air might otherwise have been drawn, and hasten the suffocation. A death of the same kind is recorded in the Persian history entitled 'Kholasat el Akhbar,' which contains (p. 162) the following passage: "The malik ordered that they should place a carpet on Abdallah's mouth, so that his life was cut off." And spread it on his face, so that he died. It has been supposed by some commentators, as Luther, Schultz, Geddes, Boothroyd, that Benhadad put the wet macber on his own face for refreshment, and accidentally suffocated himself; but this is very unlikely, and it is certainly not the natural sense of the words. As "Hazael" is the subject of "departed" and "came" and "answered" in ver. 14, so it is the natural subject of "took" and "dipped" and "spread" in ver. 15. Ver. 11 also would be unintelligible if Hazael entertained no murderous intentions. Why Ewald ('History of Israel,' vol. 4. p. 93, Eng. trans.) introduces a "bath-servant," unmentioned in the text, to murder Benhadad for no assignable reason, it is difficult to conjecture. And Hazael reigned in his stead. The direct succession of Hazael to Benhadad is confirmed by the inscription on the Black Obelisk, where he appears as King of Damascus (line 97) a few years only after Benhadad (Bin-idri) had been mentioned as king. 8:7-15 Among other changes of men's minds by affliction, it often gives other thoughts of God's ministers, and teaches to value the counsels and prayers of those whom they have hated and despised. It was not in Hazael's countenance that Elisha read what he would do, but God revealed it to him, and it fetched tears from his eyes: the more foresight men have, the more grief they are liable to. It is possible for a man, under the convictions and restraints of natural conscience, to express great abhorrence of a sin, yet afterwards to be reconciled to it. Those that are little and low in the world, cannot imagine how strong the temptations of power and prosperity are, which, if ever they arrive at, they will find how deceitful their hearts are, how much worse than they suspected. The devil ruins men, by saying they shall certainly recover and do well, so rocking them asleep in security. Hazael's false account was an injury to the king, who lost the benefit of the prophet's warning to prepare for death, and an injury to Elisha, who would be counted a false prophet. It is not certain that Hazael murdered his master, or if he caused his death it may have been without any design. But he was a dissembler, and afterwards proved a persecutor to Israel.
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Alphabetical: a and as became But cloth cover day died dipped face following Hazael he him his in it king king's next On over place so soaked spread succeeded that the Then thick took water

OT History: 2 Kings 8:15 It happened on the next day that (2Ki iiKi ii ki 2 kg 2kg) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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