Habakkuk 1:11
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
Then they sweep past like the wind and go on-- guilty people, whose own strength is their god."

New Living Translation
They sweep past like the wind and are gone. But they are deeply guilty, for their own strength is their god."

English Standard Version
Then they sweep by like the wind and go on, guilty men, whose own might is their god!”

New American Standard Bible
"Then they will sweep through like the wind and pass on. But they will be held guilty, They whose strength is their god."

King James Bible
Then shall his mind change, and he shall pass over, and offend, imputing this his power unto his god.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then they sweep by like the wind and pass through. They are guilty; their strength is their god.

International Standard Version
Then like the wind sweeping by they will pass through— they're guilty because they say their power is their god."

NET Bible
They sweep by like the wind and pass on. But the one who considers himself a god will be held guilty."

New Heart English Bible
Then he sweeps by like the wind, and goes on. He is indeed guilty, whose strength is his god."

GOD'S WORD® Translation
They will move quickly and pass through like the wind. So they will be guilty, because their own strength is their god.

JPS Tanakh 1917
Then their spirit doth pass over and transgress, And they become guilty: Even they who impute their might unto their god.

New American Standard 1977
“Then they will sweep through like the wind and pass on.
            But they will be held guilty,
            They whose strength is their god.”

Jubilee Bible 2000
Then he shall become arrogant against God, and he shall pass ahead and shall be found guilty, imputing this his power unto his god.

King James 2000 Bible
Then shall his mind change, and he shall transgress, and offend, ascribing this his power unto his god.

American King James Version
Then shall his mind change, and he shall pass over, and offend, imputing this his power to his god.

American Standard Version
Then shall he sweep by as a wind, and shall pass over, and be guilty, even he whose might is his god.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Then shall his spirit be changed, and he shall pass, and fall: this is his strength of his god.

Darby Bible Translation
Then will his mind change, and he will pass on, and become guilty: this his power is become his +god.

English Revised Version
Then shall he sweep by as a wind, and shall pass over, and be guilty: even he whose might is his god.

Webster's Bible Translation
Then shall his mind change, and he shall pass over, and offend, imputing this his power to his god.

World English Bible
Then he sweeps by like the wind, and goes on. He is indeed guilty, whose strength is his god."

Young's Literal Translation
Then passed on hath the spirit, Yea, he doth transgress, And doth ascribe this his power to his god.
Study Bible
The Lord's Answer
10"They mock at kings And rulers are a laughing matter to them. They laugh at every fortress And heap up rubble to capture it. 11"Then they will sweep through like the wind and pass on. But they will be held guilty, They whose strength is their god." 12Are You not from everlasting, O LORD, my God, my Holy One? We will not die. You, O LORD, have appointed them to judge; And You, O Rock, have established them to correct.…
Cross References
Jeremiah 2:3
"Israel was holy to the LORD, The first of His harvest. All who ate of it became guilty; Evil came upon them," declares the LORD.'"

Jeremiah 4:11
In that time it will be said to this people and to Jerusalem, "A scorching wind from the bare heights in the wilderness in the direction of the daughter of My people-- not to winnow and not to cleanse,

Jeremiah 4:12
a wind too strong for this-- will come at My command; now I will also pronounce judgments against them.

Daniel 4:30
"The king reflected and said, 'Is this not Babylon the great, which I myself have built as a royal residence by the might of my power and for the glory of my majesty?'

Habakkuk 1:16
Therefore they offer a sacrifice to their net And burn incense to their fishing net; Because through these things their catch is large, And their food is plentiful.
Treasury of Scripture

Then shall his mind change, and he shall pass over, and offend, imputing this his power to his god.

shall his.

Daniel 4:30-34 The king spoke, and said, Is not this great Babylon, that I have …

imputing.

Daniel 5:3,4,20 Then they brought the golden vessels that were taken out of the temple …

(11) Then shall his mind change. . . .--Better, Then he sweeps by like a wind and passes. But he is guilty, making this his strength his god. By an abrupt transition the latter half of the verse diverts our attention from the human view of the world-conqueror to his appearance in God's sight. Men only see an irresistible force sweeping over the face of the earth like a whirlwind; here to-day, and to-morrow nothing but devastation and ruin to testify to its visit. And men are dazzled by this mighty display of power. But, even as Daniel at Belshazzar's feast, Habakkuk pronounces the oppressor's doom in the very hour of triumph. The description of the irresistible invader drops into the sudden depths of anti-climax, "But he is (counted) guilty." His guilt consists just in what men deem so glorious, in his self-reliant irresponsible pursuit of grandeur. The brute force of armaments is the supreme deity of the Chaldan. His sword and spear are, as it were, his idols. (Comp. Habakkuk 1:16.) God, in whose hands his breath is, and whose are all his ways, has he not glorified. (Comp. Daniel 5:23.) Therefore that God shall bring on him ruin and ignominy, and the very nations which have marvelled at his prowess shall taunt and contemn him (Habakkuk 2:6). Here, then, is the key-note of so much of the second canto (Habakkuk 1:12 to 2 fin.) as relates to the downfall of the invader.

Verse 11. - Then shall his mind change; Τότε μεταβαλεῖ τὸ πνεῦμα (Septuagint); Tunc mutabitur spiritus (Vulgate). From the ease and extent of his conquests the Chaldean gains fresh spirit. But it is best to translate differently, Then he sweepeth on as a wind. The Chaldean's inroad is compared to a tempestuous wind, which carries all before it. And he shall pass over. This is explained to mean, he exceeds all limits in his arrogancy, or he passes onward through the land. The former interpretation regards what is coming, the latter keeps to the metaphor of the wind. And offend. He is guilty, or offends, as the next clause explains, by attributing his success to his own prowess and skill. Thus the prophet intimates that the avenger himself incurs God's displeasure, and will suffer for it. Septuagint, καὶ ἐξιλάσεται, which St. Cyril interprets to mean that the Lord will change his purpose of punishing the Jews, and will have mercy on them - a notion quite foreign to the purport of the sentence. Imputing this his power unto his god; more literally, this his power is his god; Revised Version, even he whose might is his god. He defies the Lord, and makes his might his god. (For such pride and self-glorification, setup. Isaiah 14:13; Isaiah 47:7, etc.; Daniel 4:30.) Thus Mezentius, the despiser of the gods, speaks in Virgil, 'AEn.,' 10:773 -

"Dextra mihi deus et telum, quod missile libro,
Nunc adsint!"
Comp. Statius, 'Theb.,' 3:615 -

"Virtus mihi numen, et ensis, Quem teneo." Then shall his mind change,.... The mind of the king of Babylon; not that, when he had taken Jerusalem, he altered his purpose, and laid aside his designs of attacking other nations, and returned to his own country; where he became guilty of gross idolatry, in setting up the golden image in the plain of Dura, which he required all his subjects to worship, and to which he ascribed all his victories; for, five years after this, Josephus (w) says, he led his army into Coelesyria, and conquered the Moabites and Ammonites, and entered Egypt, and slew the reigning king of it: but rather the disposition of his mind changed for the worse upon his success in subduing kings and princes, and their kingdoms; for though his mind was never good, but always proud, haughty, and ambitious, insolent, cruel, and tyrannical; yet, being flushed with his conquests, he grew more and more so:

and he shall pass over (x), or "transgress", all bounds of modesty and sobriety, of humanity and goodness:

and offend, imputing this his power unto his god (y); this particularly will be the sin he will be guilty of, he will ascribe all his achievements to his idol Bel; or rather to himself, to his own prowess and valour, his wisdom and skill in military affairs; for so it will bear to be rendered, making "this his own power to be his god"; and perhaps the golden image Nebuchadnezzar set up to be worshipped was for himself; see Daniel 4:30. The Targum is,

"therefore, because of the lifting up of his spirit, his kingdom was removed from him; and he committed an offence, in that he multiplied glory to his idol;''

and some interpret the whole of this of the miserable condition Nebuchadnezzar was brought into, being a prophecy of it: "then shall his mind change"; his heart from man's to a beast's, Daniel 4:16, "and he shall pass over"; from all society and conversation with men, and have his dwelling with beasts, Daniel 4:31, "and offend", or rather "be punished", and become desolate and miserable, for his pride, and idolatry, and other sins: "this his power" is "his god" (z); spoken ironically; see what his power is now, being changed into a beast, which he reckoned his god, or gloried in as what he had from his god: but I rather think the whole is a continuation of his success, particularly in the land of Judea; and to be rendered, "then shall he pass through, as the wind, and shall pass over; and he shall bear the punishment of his sin, whose power is his god"; that is, the king of Babylon and his army, the Chaldeans, should pass through all nations and kingdoms that were between them and Judea, like a strong wind or whirlwind, to which they are compared, Jeremiah 4:13 and carry all before them, none being able to resist and oppose them; and should pass over rivers that lay in their way, and the boundaries of Judea, and spread themselves over the whole country; and then that country, and the inhabitants of it, should be punished for their sins, particularly for their confidence in themselves; in their wealth and riches; in their fortresses and strong towers; in their own works of righteousness; all which they made idols of, and trusted not in their God, as they ought to have done.

(w) Antiqu. l. 10. c. 9. sect. 7. (x) "transgredietur", Pagninus, Vatablus, Calvin, Drusius, Tarnovius. (y) "iste est, ejus robur fuit pro deo ejus", Gussetius. (z) "Tune immutatus est spiritu, et transiit et desolatus est, hoc robur ejus est dei ejus", De Dieu. 11. Then—when elated by his successes.

shall his mind change—He shall lose whatever of reason or moderation ever was in him, with pride.

he shall pass over—all bounds and restraints: his pride preparing the sure way for his destruction (Pr 16:18). The language is very similar to that describing Nebuchadnezzar's "change" from man's heart (understanding) to that of a beast, because of pride (see on [1163]Da 4:16; [1164]Da 4:30, 31; [1165]Da 4:33, 34). An undesigned coincidence between the two sacred books written independently.

imputing this his power unto his god—(Da 5:4). Sacrilegious arrogance, in ascribing to his idol Bel the glory that belongs to God [Calvin]. Grotius explains, "(saying that) his power is his own as one who is a god to himself" (compare Hab 1:16, and Da 3:1-30). So Maurer, "He shall offend as one to whom his power is his god" (Job 12:6; see on [1166]Mic 2:1).1:1-11 The servants of the Lord are deeply afflicted by seeing ungodliness and violence prevail; especially among those who profess the truth. No man scrupled doing wrong to his neighbour. We should long to remove to the world where holiness and love reign for ever, and no violence shall be before us. God has good reasons for his long-suffering towards bad men, and the rebukes of good men. The day will come when the cry of sin will be heard against those that do wrong, and the cry of prayer for those that suffer wrong. They were to notice what was going forward among the heathen by the Chaldeans, and to consider themselves a nation to be scourged by them. But most men presume on continued prosperity, or that calamities will not come in their days. They are a bitter and hasty nation, fierce, cruel, and bearing down all before them. They shall overcome all that oppose them. But it is a great offence, and the common offence of proud people, to take glory to themselves. The closing words give a glimpse of comfort.
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