Luke 5:39
New International Version
And no one after drinking old wine wants the new, for they say, 'The old is better.'"

New Living Translation
But no one who drinks the old wine seems to want the new wine. ‘The old is just fine,’ they say.”

English Standard Version
And no one after drinking old wine desires new, for he says, ‘The old is good.’”

Berean Study Bible
And no one after drinking old wine wants new, for he says, ‘The old is better.’”

Berean Literal Bible
And no one having drunk old wine desires new; for he says, 'The old is better.'"

New American Standard Bible
"And no one, after drinking old wine wishes for new; for he says, 'The old is good enough.'"

King James Bible
No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better.

Christian Standard Bible
And no one, after drinking old wine, wants new, because he says, 'The old is better.'"

Contemporary English Version
No one wants new wine after drinking old wine. They say, "The old wine is better."

Good News Translation
And you don't want new wine after drinking old wine. 'The old is better,' you say."

Holman Christian Standard Bible
And no one, after drinking old wine, wants new, because he says, The old is better.'"

International Standard Version
No one who has been drinking old wine wants new wine, because he says, 'The old wine is good enough!'"

NET Bible
No one after drinking old wine wants the new, for he says, 'The old is good enough.'"

New Heart English Bible
And no one having drunk old wine desires new, for he says, 'The old is good.'"

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And no man drinks old wine and at once desires the new, for he says, “The old is sweet.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"No one who has been drinking old wine wants new wine. He says, 'The old wine is better!'"

New American Standard 1977
“And no one, after drinking old wine wishes for new; for he says, ‘The old is good enough.’”

Jubilee Bible 2000
No one also having drunk of the old straightway desires the new, for he says, The old is better.

King James 2000 Bible
No man also having drunk old wine immediately desires new: for he says, The old is better.

American King James Version
No man also having drunk old wine straightway desires new: for he said, The old is better.

American Standard Version
And no man having drunk old wine desireth new; for he saith, The old is good.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And no man drinking old, hath presently a mind to new: for he saith, The old is better.

Darby Bible Translation
And no one having drunk old wine [straightway] wishes for new, for he says, The old is better.

English Revised Version
And no man having drunk old wine desireth new: for he saith, The old is good.

Webster's Bible Translation
No man also having drank old wine, immediately desireth new: for he saith, The old is better.

Weymouth New Testament
Nor does any one after drinking old wine wish for new; for he says, 'The old is better.'"

World English Bible
No man having drunk old wine immediately desires new, for he says, 'The old is better.'"

Young's Literal Translation
and no one having drunk old wine, doth immediately wish new, for he saith, The old is better.'
Study Bible
The Patches and the Wineskins
38Instead, new wine is poured into new wineskins. 39And no one after drinking old wine wants new, for he says, ‘The old is better.’”
Cross References
Matthew 5:40
if someone wants to sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well;

Luke 5:38
Instead, new wine is poured into new wineskins.

Luke 6:1
One Sabbath Jesus was passing through the grainfields, and His disciples began to pick the heads of grain, rub them in their hands, and eat them.

Treasury of Scripture

No man also having drunk old wine straightway desires new: for he said, The old is better.

Jeremiah 6:16
Thus saith the LORD, Stand ye in the ways, and see, and ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk therein, and ye shall find rest for your souls. But they said, We will not walk therein.

Mark 7:7-13
Howbeit in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men…

Romans 4:11,12
And he received the sign of circumcision, a seal of the righteousness of the faith which he had yet being uncircumcised: that he might be the father of all them that believe, though they be not circumcised; that righteousness might be imputed unto them also: …







Lexicon
And
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

no one
οὐδεὶς (oudeis)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3762: No one, none, nothing.

after drinking
πιὼν (piōn)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4095: To drink, imbibe. A prolonged form of pio, which poo occurs only as an alternate in certain tenses; to imbibe.

old [wine ]
παλαιὸν (palaion)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3820: Old, ancient, not new or recent. From palai; antique, i.e. Not recent, worn out.

wants
θέλει (thelei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2309: To will, wish, desire, be willing, intend, design.

new,
νέον (neon)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3501: (a) young, youthful, (b) new, fresh.

for
γάρ (gar)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1063: For. A primary particle; properly, assigning a reason.

he says,
λέγει (legei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 3004: (a) I say, speak; I mean, mention, tell, (b) I call, name, especially in the pass., (c) I tell, command.

‘The
(Ho)
Article - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

old
παλαιὸς (palaios)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3820: Old, ancient, not new or recent. From palai; antique, i.e. Not recent, worn out.

is
ἐστιν (estin)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1510: I am, exist. The first person singular present indicative; a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist.

better.’”
χρηστός (chrēstos)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 5543: Useful, gentle, pleasant, kind. From chraomai; employed, i.e. useful.
(39) No man also having drunk old wine.--This addition is peculiar to St. Luke, and calls accordingly for distinct notice. The interpretation of the imagery is not far to seek. The old wine is the principle--in spiritual things, the religion--that animated the man's former life. In relation to those immediately addressed, it represented the motive-power of the Law in its rigid and Pharisaic form. The new wine, as in the Notes on the previous parables, is the freer, nobler, life-power of the gospel. It was not to be wondered at that men accustomed to the older system should be unwilling to embrace the new, as thinking it stronger and more potent than they could bear. The words are spoken in a tone of something like a tolerant pity for the prejudices of age and custom.

The old is better.--The better MSS. give simply "the old is good," the adjective partly implying the sense of "mild." It is not the same as the "good wine" of the miracle at Cana (John 2:10). It is doubtful, indeed, whether the Jews attached the same value that we do to the mellowed flavour given to wine by age. New or sweet wine, drunk within a year or so of fermentation, would seem to have been the favourite delicacy (Nehemiah 10:39; Proverbs 3:10; Hosea 4:11; Haggai 1:11, et al.), though men of weak constitutions might shrink from its effects, as the Pharisees were shrinking from the freedom of which our Lord set the example. Not altogether without significance, as bearing on this passage, is the fact recorded by St. Luke (Acts 2:13), that the first workings of the Pentecostal gift led men to speak of the disciples as "full of new wine."

Verse 39. - No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better. St. Luke alone of the first three evangelists who related in detail this most important reply of Jesus when the disciples of John and the Pharisees came to question him, adds this curious simile. The meaning of the parable-pictures of the new patch being sewn on an old garment, and of new wine being poured into worn-out, decaying wine-skins, was very plain. Pitilessly severe it would ring in the ears of men brought up in the old rabbinic Jewish schools. The two first evangelists, conscious of the truth of their Master's words, were content to leave the stern teaching, which pronounced the old state of things among the religious Jews as utterly worn-out, in all its naked severity. But Paul, under whose guidance we believe Luke wrote his Gospel, with that tender and considerate love which so beautifies the earnest and impassioned nature of the apostle of the Gentiles, knew that Jesus had added a few words to the two seemingly harsh parables; these he bade Luke carefully insert in his narrative. They contain what may be termed an almost playful apology for the slowness and reluctance of the men trained in the rabbinic schools, or even of the pupils of John the Baptist, to accept the new, broad, generous view of truth which he (Jesus) was putting forth - it was an apology for a slowness and reluctance, shading too often into unveiled dislike and open hostility. (What experience Paul and Luke must have had of this hostility!) The Master, in his Divine wisdom, knew how hard it was to forsake long-cherished prejudices. Time must be given, allowance must be made, harsh judgment must be deprecated. These men, trained in the old system, are here compared to guests who, after the banquet, are suddenly asked to change the old wine, mellowed by age, of which they have been drinking, for new sweet wine. This new wine seems, in those days, generally to have been considered preferable, but to men who had been drinking the old, age-softened vintage, the new would seem fiery and even harsh. The Greek word rendered in the Authorized Version "better," in the older authorities is positive instead of comparative. The translation should therefore run," the old is good." The argument would be the same: Why change what we have been drinking for something new? surely the old wine is good? Such passages as Nehemiah 10:35; Proverbs 3:10; Hosea 4:11; Haggai 1:11, bear out the above statement, that in those days, among the Jews of Syria, Palestine, and the adjacent countries, new sweet wine was a favourite beverage among wine-drinkers.



5:27-39 It was a wonder of Christ's grace, that he would call a publican to be his disciple and follower. It was a wonder of his grace, that the call was made so effectual. It was a wonder of his grace, that he came to call sinners to repentance, and to assure them of pardon. It was a wonder of his grace, that he so patiently bore the contradiction of sinners against himself and his disciples. It was a wonder of his grace, that he fixed the services of his disciples according to their strength and standing. The Lord trains up his people gradually for the trials allotted them; we should copy his example in dealing with the weak in faith, or the tempted believer.
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