2 Peter 2:22
New International Version
Of them the proverbs are true: “A dog returns to its vomit,” and, “A sow that is washed returns to her wallowing in the mud.”

New Living Translation
They prove the truth of this proverb: “A dog returns to its vomit.” And another says, “A washed pig returns to the mud.”

English Standard Version
What the true proverb says has happened to them: “The dog returns to its own vomit, and the sow, after washing herself, returns to wallow in the mire.”

Berean Study Bible
Of them the proverbs are true: “A dog returns to its vomit,” and, “A sow that is washed goes back to her wallowing in the mud.”

Berean Literal Bible
The thing true of the proverb has happened to them: "A dog having returned to its own vomit," and, "A sow having washed, to her rolling place in the mire."

King James Bible
But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire.

New King James Version
But it has happened to them according to the true proverb: “A dog returns to his own vomit,” and, “a sow, having washed, to her wallowing in the mire.”

New American Standard Bible
It has happened to them according to the true proverb, “A DOG RETURNS TO ITS OWN VOMIT,” and, “A sow, after washing, returns to wallowing in the mire.”

NASB 1995
It has happened to them according to the true proverb, “A DOG RETURNS TO ITS OWN VOMIT,” and, “A sow, after washing, returns to wallowing in the mire.”

NASB 1977
It has happened to them according to the true proverb, “A DOG RETURNS TO ITS OWN VOMIT,” and, “A sow, after washing, returns to wallowing in the mire.”

Amplified Bible
The thing spoken of in the true proverb has happened to them, “THE DOG RETURNS TO HIS OWN VOMIT,” and, “A sow is washed only to wallow [again] in the mire.”

Christian Standard Bible
It has happened to them according to the true proverb: A dog returns to its own vomit, and, “A washed sow returns to wallowing in the mud.”

Holman Christian Standard Bible
It has happened to them according to the true proverb: A dog returns to its own vomit, and, “a sow, after washing itself, wallows in the mud.”

American Standard Version
It has happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog turning to his own vomit again, and the sow that had washed to wallowing in the mire.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But these things have happened to them of the true proverb: “The dog that returned to its vomit, and the pig that was washed to the wallowing of the mud.”

Contemporary English Version
What happened to them is just like the true saying, "A dog will come back to lick up its own vomit. A pig that has been washed will roll in the mud."

Douay-Rheims Bible
For, that of the true proverb has happened to them: The dog is returned to his vomit: and, The sow that was washed, to her wallowing in the mire.

English Revised Version
It has happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog turning to his own vomit again, and the sow that had washed to wallowing in the mire.

Good News Translation
What happened to them shows that the proverbs are true: "A dog goes back to what it has vomited" and "A pig that has been washed goes back to roll in the mud."

GOD'S WORD® Translation
These proverbs have come true for them: "A dog goes back to its vomit," and "A sow that has been washed goes back to roll around in the mud."

International Standard Version
The proverb is true that describes what has happened to them: "A dog returns to its vomit," and "A pig that is washed goes back to wallow in the mud."

Literal Standard Version
and that of the true proverb has happened to them: “A dog turned back on his own vomit,” and, “A sow having bathed herself—to rolling in mire.”

NET Bible
They are illustrations of this true proverb: "A dog returns to its own vomit," and "A sow, after washing herself, wallows in the mire."

New Heart English Bible
It has happened to them according to the true proverb, "The dog turns to his own vomit again," and "the sow that has washed to wallowing in the mire."

Weymouth New Testament
Their case is that described in the true proverb, "A dog returns to what he has vomited," and also in the other proverb, "The sow has washed itself and now goes back to roll in its filth."

World English Bible
But it has happened to them according to the true proverb, "The dog turns to his own vomit again," and "the sow that has washed to wallowing in the mire."

Young's Literal Translation
and happened to them hath that of the true similitude; 'A dog did turn back upon his own vomit,' and, 'A sow having bathed herself -- to rolling in mire.'

Additional Translations ...
Context
Deliverance from False Prophets
21It would have been better for them not to have known the way of righteousness than to have known it and then to turn away from the holy commandment passed on to them. 22Of them the proverbs are true: “A dog returns to its vomit,” and, “A sow that is washed goes back to her wallowing in the mud.”

Cross References
Proverbs 26:11
As a dog returns to its vomit, so a fool repeats his folly.

John 10:6
Jesus spoke to them using this illustration, but they did not understand what He was telling them.


Treasury of Scripture

But it is happened to them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire.

The dog.

Proverbs 26:11
As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his folly.









(22) But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb.--More literally, There has happened to them what the true proverb says; "but" is of very doubtful authority. The word for "proverb" is the one used elsewhere only by St. John in his Gospel, and there translated once "parable" and thrice "proverb." "Parable," or "allegory," would have been best in all four cases (John 10:6, where see Note; John 16:25; John 16:29). The first proverb is found, Proverbs 26:11, and if that be the source of the quotation, we have here an independent translation of the Hebrew, for the LXX. gives an entirely different rendering, "dog" being the only word in common to the two Greek versions. The word for "vomit" here is possibly formed by the writer himself; that for "wallowing" is also a rare word. The LXX. adds, "and becomes abominable," which has no equivalent in the existing Hebrew text; and it has been suggested that these words may misrepresent the Hebrew original of the second proverb here. But it is quite possible that both proverbs come from popular tradition, and not from Scripture at all. If, however, the Book of Proverbs be the source of the quotation, it is worth while noting that no less than four times in as many chapters does St. Peter recall passages from the Proverbs in the First Epistle (1Peter 1:7; 1Peter 2:17; 1Peter 4:8; 1Peter 4:18). In the Greek neither proverb has a verb, as so often in such sayings--a dog that has returned to his own vomit; a washed sow to wallowing in the mire; just as we say "the dog in the manger," "a fool and his money." . . . Verse 22. - But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb. The conjunction "but" is omitted in the best manuscripts. The literal translation is, "There hath happened unto them that of the true proverb (τὸ τῆς παροιμίας);" comp. Matthew 21:21, τὸ τῆς συκῆς. The dog is turned to his own vomit again. The construction is participial; literally, a dog having turned. See Wirier (3:45, 6, b), who says that in such proverbial expressions there is no reason for changing the participle into a finite verb: "They are spoken δεικτικῶς as it were, with reference to a case actually observed." St. Peter may be quoting Proverbs 26:11; but his words are very different from the Septuagint Version of that passage; perhaps it is more probable that the expression had become proverbial, and that the apostle is referring to a form of it in common use with his readers; like that which follows, which is not in the Book of Proverbs. And the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire; literally, the sow that had washed to her wallowing; or, according to some ancient manuscripts, "her wallowing-place." St. Peter compares the lives of the false teachers to the habits of those animals which were regarded as unclean, and were most despised by the Jews (compare our Lord's words in Matthew 7:6). The words ἐξέραμα, vomit; κυλισμός, wallowing; and βόρβορος, mire, are not found elsewhere in the New Testament.



Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek
Of them
αὐτοῖς (autois)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Dative Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Strong's 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

the
τὸ (to)
Article - Nominative Neuter Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

proverbs
παροιμίας (paroimias)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's 3942: A cryptic saying, an allegory; a proverb, figurative discourse.

are
συμβέβηκεν (symbebēken)
Verb - Perfect Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 4819: To happen, occur, meet. From sun and the base of basis; to walk together, i.e. Concur.

true:
ἀληθοῦς (alēthous)
Adjective - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's 227: Unconcealed, true, true in fact, worthy of credit, truthful. TRUE.

“A dog
Κύων (Kyōn)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 2965: A dog, universally despised in the East. A primary word; a dog.

returns
ἐπιστρέψας (epistrepsas)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 1994: From epi and strepho; to revert.

to
ἐπὶ (epi)
Preposition
Strong's 1909: On, to, against, on the basis of, at.

[its]
ἴδιον (idion)
Adjective - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's 2398: Pertaining to self, i.e. One's own; by implication, private or separate.

vomit,”
ἐξέραμα (exerama)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's 1829: Vomit. From a comparative of ek and a presumed erao; vomit, i.e. Food disgorged.

and,
καί (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

“A sow
Ὗς (Hys)
Noun - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's 5300: A hog, boar, or sow. Apparently a primary word; a hog.

that is washed
λουσαμένη (lousamenē)
Verb - Aorist Participle Middle - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's 3068: A primary verb; to bathe.

[goes back] to [her]
εἰς (eis)
Preposition
Strong's 1519: A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.

wallowing
κυλισμὸν (kylismon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 2946: A place of wallowing. From kulioo; a wallow, i.e. Filth.

in [the] mud.”
βορβόρου (borborou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's 1004: Mud, mire, filth. Of uncertain derivation; mud.


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NT Letters: 2 Peter 2:22 But it has happened to them according (2 Pet. 2P iiP ii Pet)
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