Hebrews 2:16
New International Version
For surely it is not angels he helps, but Abraham's descendants.

New Living Translation
We also know that the Son did not come to help angels; he came to help the descendants of Abraham.

English Standard Version
For surely it is not angels that he helps, but he helps the offspring of Abraham.

Berean Study Bible
For surely it is not the angels He helps, but the descendants of Abraham.

Berean Literal Bible
For surely He helps not the angels, but He helps the seed of Abraham.

New American Standard Bible
For assuredly He does not give help to angels, but He gives help to the descendant of Abraham.

King James Bible
For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham.

Christian Standard Bible
For it is clear that he does not reach out to help angels, but to help Abraham's offspring.

Contemporary English Version
Jesus clearly did not come to help angels, but he did come to help Abraham's descendants.

Good News Translation
For it is clear that it is not the angels that he helps. Instead, he helps the descendants of Abraham.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
For it is clear that He does not reach out to help angels, but to help Abraham's offspring.

International Standard Version
For it is clear that he did not come to help angels. No, he came to help Abraham's descendants,

NET Bible
For surely his concern is not for angels, but he is concerned for Abraham's descendants.

New Heart English Bible
For, truly, he did not come to help the angels, but to help the offspring of Abraham.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
For death was not authorized over the Angels, but death was authorized over the seed of Abraham.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
So Jesus helps Abraham's descendants rather than helping angels.

New American Standard 1977
For assuredly He does not give help to angels, but He gives help to the descendant of Abraham.

Jubilee Bible 2000
For verily he did not take the angels, but he took the seed of Abraham.

King James 2000 Bible
For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the nature of Abraham.

American King James Version
For truly he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham.

American Standard Version
For verily not to angels doth he give help, but he giveth help to the seed of Abraham.

Douay-Rheims Bible
For no where doth he take hold of the angels: but of the seed of Abraham he taketh hold.

Darby Bible Translation
For he does not indeed take hold of angels [by the hand], but he takes hold of the seed of Abraham.

English Revised Version
For verily not of angels doth he take hold, but he taketh hold of the seed of Abraham.

Webster's Bible Translation
For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham.

Weymouth New Testament
For assuredly it is not to angels that He is continually reaching a helping hand, but it is to the descendants of Abraham.

World English Bible
For most certainly, he doesn't give help to angels, but he gives help to the seed of Abraham.

Young's Literal Translation
for, doubtless, of messengers it doth not lay hold, but of seed of Abraham it layeth hold,
Study Bible
Jesus Like His Brothers
15and free those who all their lives were held in slavery by their fear of death. 16For surely it is not the angels He helps, but the descendants of Abraham. 17So He had to be made like His brothers in every way, that He might become a merciful and faithful high priest in service to God, in order to make atonement for the sins of the people.…
Cross References
Hebrews 2:15
and free those who all their lives were held in slavery by their fear of death.

Hebrews 2:17
So He had to be made like His brothers in every way, that He might become a merciful and faithful high priest in service to God, in order to make atonement for the sins of the people.

Treasury of Scripture

For truly he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham.

verily.

Hebrews 6:16
For men verily swear by the greater: and an oath for confirmation is to them an end of all strife.

Hebrews 12:10
For they verily for a few days chastened us after their own pleasure; but he for our profit, that we might be partakers of his holiness.

Romans 2:25
For circumcision verily profiteth, if thou keep the law: but if thou be a breaker of the law, thy circumcision is made uncircumcision.

took not, etc.

Genesis 22:18
And in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed; because thou hast obeyed my voice.

Matthew 1:1
The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.

Romans 4:16
Therefore it is of faith, that it might be by grace; to the end the promise might be sure to all the seed; not to that only which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham; who is the father of us all,







Lexicon
For
γὰρ (gar)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1063: For. A primary particle; properly, assigning a reason.

surely
δή‿ (dē)
Particle
Strong's Greek 1211: Probably akin to de; a particle of emphasis or explicitness; now, then, etc.

[it is] not
Οὐ (Ou)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3756: No, not. Also ouk, and ouch a primary word; the absolute negative adverb; no or not.

[the] angels
ἀγγέλων (angelōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 32: From aggello; a messenger; especially an 'angel'; by implication, a pastor.

He helps,
ἐπιλαμβάνεται (epilambanetai)
Verb - Present Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1949: To lay hold of, take hold of, seize (sometimes with beneficent, sometimes with hostile, intent).

but
ἀλλὰ (alla)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 235: But, except, however. Neuter plural of allos; properly, other things, i.e. contrariwise.

[the] descendants
σπέρματος (spermatos)
Noun - Genitive Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 4690: From speiro; something sown, i.e. Seed; by implication, offspring; specially, a remnant.

of Abraham.
Ἀβραὰμ (Abraam)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 11: Abraham, progenitor of the Hebrew race. Of Hebrew origin; Abraham, the Hebrew patriarch.
(16) He took not on him the nature of angels.--The rendering of the margin approaches very nearly the true meaning of the verse; whereas the text (in which the Authorised version differs from all our earlier translations) introduces confusion into the argument. Having spoken in Hebrews 2:14 of our Lord's assumption of human nature, the writer in these words assigns the reason: "For surely it is not of angels that He taketh hold, but He taketh hold of the seed of Abraham." Though the words "take hold," which occur twice in the verse, probably cannot directly signify "help" (as is often maintained), they distinctly suggest laying hold for the sake of giving help; and a beautiful illustration may be found in some of the Gospel narratives of our Lord's works of healing (Mark 8:23; Luke 14:4). It is probable that the language used here is derived from the Old Testament. In Hebrews 8:9, a quotation from Jeremiah 31, we read, "In the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt." Isaiah 41:8-9, however, is perhaps a still closer parallel (for the word used in the Greek version is very similar, and no doubt expresses the same meaning): "Thou Israel, my servant, Jacob whom I have chosen, the seed of Abraham my friend; thou of whom I have taken hold from the ends of the earth." If the writer had these verses in his thought, it is hardly necessary to inquire why he chooses the expression "seed of Abraham," instead of one of (apparently) wider meaning, such as Hebrews 2:7-8, might seem to require. But even apart from this passage of Isaiah, and the natural fitness of such a phrase in words addressed to Jews, we may doubt if any other language would have been equally expressive. For as to the means, it was by becoming a child of Abraham that the Saviour "took hold of" our race to raise it up; and as to the purpose, St. Paul teaches us that "the seed of Abraham" includes all who inherit Abraham's faith.

Verses 16, 17. - For verily, etc. The A.V. (following the ancient interpreters) takes this verse as referring to the Incarnation. But

(1) ἐπιλαμβάνεσθαι σπέρματος and, still more, ἐπιλαμβάνεσθαι ἀγγέλων, seems an awkward way of expressing "to assume the nature of." The usual sense of the verb, followed by a genitive, is "to take hold of," as ἐπιλαμβάνεσθαι χειρός (Acts 23:19; Mark 8:23); and especially in the sense of "succouring" (cf. Matthew 14:31; Hebrews 8:9; Isaiah 31:32, Ἐν ἡμέρα ἐπιλᾶμβομένου μου τῆς χειρὸς αὐτῶν; and Ecclus. 4:11, Ἡ σοφία ἐπιλαμβάνεται τῶν ζητούντων αὐτήν.

(2) The present tense of the verb is inappropriate to the past act of the Incarnation, which has, moreover, been sufficiently declared in ver. 14.

(3) The sequence of though+, in the following verse is not easily intelligible if the Incarnation be the subject of this:" Whence it behooved him to be made like unto his brethren;" - this does not follow from his having become incarnate; we should rather say that his incarnation was the means of his being made like them. Translate, therefore, observing the position of the substantives before the verbs, For not, I ween, angels cloth he lay hold of (to succor them), but the seed of Abraham he doth lay hold of. The allusion is to its being the human "children of promise," and not angels, that are denoted in prophecy as being, and acknowledged to be, the object of the Messianic redemption. The expression, "the seed of Abraham," is, of course, not intended to exclude the Gentiles: it is appropriately used in reference to the Messianic promises of the Old Testament (cf. Genesis 23:18; Isaiah 41:8): and the extension of its meaning to "all them that believe" would be as familiar to the first readers of the Epistle as to us (cf. Matthew 3:9; John 8:39; Romans 4:11, 16). The conclusion of ver. 17 (which repeats virtually what has been alleged before, after reason given) now naturally follows: Whence it behooved him in all things to be assimilated to his brethren; i.e. to the race which was the object of his redemptive succor. But, further, why the need of this entire assimilation, to the extent of participation in suffering unto death? That he might become a merciful (or, compassionate) high priest, in things pertaining to God, to make propitiation for the sins of the people. It was that he might be fully constituted as the High Priest of humanity. Here, according to the manner of the Epistle, the view of priesthood, to be afterwards set forth at length, is briefly hinted. It is taken up in Hebrews 5, after the conclusion that Christ is man's High Priest has been reached by another line of argument (see preceding summary). In Hebrews 5. one of the essentials of a true high priest (whose office is to mediate for man in things pertaining to God) is set forth as being that he should be of the same race and nature with those for whom he mediates, and able in all respects to sympathize with them: and this view is here foreshadowed. 2:14-18 The angels fell, and remained without hope or help. Christ never designed to be the Saviour of the fallen angels, therefore he did not take their nature; and the nature of angels could not be an atoning sacrifice for the sin of man. Here is a price paid, enough for all, and suitable to all, for it was in our nature. Here the wonderful love of God appeared, that, when Christ knew what he must suffer in our nature, and how he must die in it, yet he readily took it upon him. And this atonement made way for his people's deliverance from Satan's bondage, and for the pardon of their sins through faith. Let those who dread death, and strive to get the better of their terrors, no longer attempt to outbrave or to stifle them, no longer grow careless or wicked through despair. Let them not expect help from the world, or human devices; but let them seek pardon, peace, grace, and a lively hope of heaven, by faith in Him who died and rose again, that thus they may rise above the fear of death. The remembrance of his own sorrows and temptations, makes Christ mindful of the trials of his people, and ready to help them. He is ready and willing to succour those who are tempted, and seek him. He became man, and was tempted, that he might be every way qualified to succour his people, seeing that he had passed through the same temptations himself, but continued perfectly free from sin. Then let not the afflicted and tempted despond, or give place to Satan, as if temptations made it wrong for them to come to the Lord in prayer. Not soul ever perished under temptation, that cried unto the Lord from real alarm at its danger, with faith and expectation of relief. This is our duty upon our first being surprised by temptations, and would stop their progress, which is our wisdom.
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Alphabetical: Abraham Abraham's angels assuredly but descendant descendants does For give gives he help helps is it not of surely the to

NT Letters: Hebrews 2:16 For most certainly he doesn't give help (Heb. He. Hb) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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