Acts 28:2
New International Version
The islanders showed us unusual kindness. They built a fire and welcomed us all because it was raining and cold.

New Living Translation
The people of the island were very kind to us. It was cold and rainy, so they built a fire on the shore to welcome us.

English Standard Version
The native people showed us unusual kindness, for they kindled a fire and welcomed us all, because it had begun to rain and was cold.

Berean Study Bible
The islanders showed us extraordinary kindness. They kindled a fire and welcomed all of us because it was raining and cold.

Berean Literal Bible
And the natives were showing not just the ordinary kindness to us. For having kindled a fire, they received all of us, because of the rain coming on and because of the cold.

New American Standard Bible
The natives showed us extraordinary kindness; for because of the rain that had set in and because of the cold, they kindled a fire and received us all.

King James Bible
And the barbarous people shewed us no little kindness: for they kindled a fire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

Christian Standard Bible
The local people showed us extraordinary kindness. They lit a fire and took us all in, since it was raining and cold.

Contemporary English Version
The local people were very friendly, and they welcomed us by building a fire, because it was rainy and cold.

Good News Translation
The natives there were very friendly to us. It had started to rain and was cold, so they built a fire and made us all welcome.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The local people showed us extraordinary kindness, for they lit a fire and took us all in, since it was raining and cold.

International Standard Version
The people who lived there were unusually kind to us. It had started to rain and was cold, so they started a bonfire and invited us to join them around it.

NET Bible
The local inhabitants showed us extraordinary kindness, for they built a fire and welcomed us all because it had started to rain and was cold.

New Heart English Bible
The natives showed us uncommon kindness; for they kindled a fire, and received us all, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And the Barbarians who were dwelling in it showed us great kindness and kindled a fire and called us all to warm ourselves, because there was much cold rain.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
The people who lived on the island were unusually kind to us. They made a fire and welcomed all of us around it because of the rain and the cold.

New American Standard 1977
And the natives showed us extraordinary kindness; for because of the rain that had set in and because of the cold, they kindled a fire and received us all.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And the barbarous people showed us no little kindness; for they kindled a great fire and received all of us because of the present rain and because of the cold.

King James 2000 Bible
And the native people showed us no little kindness: for they kindled a fire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

American King James Version
And the barbarous people showed us no little kindness: for they kindled a fire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

American Standard Version
And the barbarians showed us no common kindness; for they kindled a fire, and received us all, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

Douay-Rheims Bible
For kindling a fire, they refreshed us all, because of the present rain, and of the cold.

Darby Bible Translation
But the barbarians shewed us no common kindness; for, having kindled a fire, they took us all in because of the rain that was falling and because of the cold.

English Revised Version
And the barbarians shewed us no common kindness: for they kindled a fire, and received us all, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

Webster's Bible Translation
And the barbarous people showed us no little kindness: for they kindled a fire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

Weymouth New Testament
The strange-speaking natives showed us remarkable kindness, for they lighted a fire and made us all welcome because of the pelting rain and the cold.

World English Bible
The natives showed us uncommon kindness; for they kindled a fire, and received us all, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

Young's Literal Translation
and the foreigners were shewing us no ordinary kindness, for having kindled a fire, they received us all, because of the pressing rain, and because of the cold;
Study Bible GRK ▾ 
Ashore on Malta
1Once we were safely ashore, we learned that the island was called Malta. 2The islanders showed us extraordinary kindness. They kindled a fire and welcomed all of us because it was raining and cold. 3Paul gathered a bundle of sticks, and as he laid them on the fire, a viper, driven out by the heat, fastened itself to his hand.…
Cross References
Acts 28:3
Paul gathered a bundle of sticks, and as he laid them on the fire, a viper, driven out by the heat, fastened itself to his hand.

Acts 28:4
When the islanders saw the creature hanging from his hand, they said to one another, "Surely this man is a murderer. Although he was saved from the sea, Justice has not allowed him to live."

Romans 1:14
I am obligated both to Greeks and non-Greeks, both to the wise and the foolish.

Romans 14:1
Accept him whose faith is weak, without passing judgment on his opinions.

Romans 14:3
The one who eats everything must not belittle the one who does not, and the one who does not eat everything must not judge the one who does, for God has accepted him.

1 Corinthians 14:11
If, then, I do not know the meaning of someone's language, I am a foreigner to the speaker, and he is a foreigner to me.

Colossians 3:11
Here there is no Greek or Jew, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, or free, but Christ is all and is in all.

Treasury of Scripture

And the barbarous people showed us no little kindness: for they kindled a fire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

barbarous.

Acts 28:4 And when the barbarians saw the venomous beast hang on his hand, …

Romans 1:14 I am debtor both to the Greeks, and to the Barbarians; both to the …

1 Corinthians 14:11 Therefore if I know not the meaning of the voice, I shall be to him …

Colossians 3:11 Where there is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcision nor uncircumcision, …

shewed.

Acts 27:3 And the next day we touched at Sidon. And Julius courteously entreated Paul…

Leviticus 19:18,34 You shall not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of …

Proverbs 24:11,12 If you forbear to deliver them that are drawn to death, and those …

Matthew 10:42 And whoever shall give to drink to one of these little ones a cup …

Luke 10:30-37 And Jesus answering said, A certain man went down from Jerusalem …

Romans 2:14,15,27 For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things …

Hebrews 13:2 Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained …

because.

Ezra 10:9 Then all the men of Judah and Benjamin gathered themselves together …

John 18:18 And the servants and officers stood there, who had made a fire of …

2 Corinthians 11:27 In weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, …







Lexicon
The
οἵ (hoi)
Article - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

islanders
βάρβαροι (barbaroi)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 915: A foreigner, one who speaks neither Greek nor Latin; as adj: foreign. Of uncertain derivation; a foreigner.

showed
παρεῖχον (pareichon)
Verb - Imperfect Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 3930: From para and echo; to hold near, i.e. Present, afford, exhibit, furnish occasion.

us
ἡμῖν (hēmin)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Dative 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

extraordinary
τυχοῦσαν (tychousan)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 5177: (a) gen: I obtain, (b) absol: I chance, happen; ordinary, everyday, it may chance, perhaps.

kindness.
φιλανθρωπίαν (philanthrōpian)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 5363: Love of mankind, benevolence. From the same as philanthropos; fondness of mankind, i.e. Benevolence.

They kindled
ἅψαντες (hapsantes)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 681: To kindle, light. A primary verb; properly, to fasten to, i.e. to set on fire.

a fire
πυρὰν (pyran)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 4443: A fire, pile of burning fuel. From pur; a fire.

[and] welcomed
προσελάβοντο (proselabonto)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Middle - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 4355: (a) I take to myself, (b) I take aside, (c) I welcome. From pros and lambano; to take to oneself, i.e. Use, lead, admit.

all
πάντας (pantas)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3956: All, the whole, every kind of. Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.

of us
ἡμᾶς (hēmas)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Accusative 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

because [it was]
διὰ (dia)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

raining
ὑετὸν (hyeton)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 5205: Rain. From a primary huo; rain, especially a shower.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

cold.
ψῦχος (psychos)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 5592: Cold. From psucho; coolness.
(2) The barbarous people . . .--It has been urged in favour of Meleda that this description is more applicable to the people of that island than to those of Malta, whom Diodorus Siculus (v. 12) describes as "very rich, practising many trades, manufacturing fine clothes, and dwelling in large and splendid houses." It is obvious, however, that St. Luke uses the term, as St. Paul does (Romans 1:14; 1Corinthians 14:11), and as was then common, as applicable to all races that did not speak Greek, and that such a term as "Scythian" (Colossians 3:11) was used to describe what we should call "barbarians" or "savages." For him "barbarian" was like the term "native," which our travellers apply indiscriminately to Fiji Islanders and Cingalese. The language of Malta at the time, if not absolutely Punic, was probably a very bastard Greek. The inscriptions which have been found in the island are, as was natural, in the Greek and Latin, which were used as official languages by their rulers.

No little kindness.--Literally, no common (or average) philanthropy. The idiom is the same as that of the "special miracles" of Acts 19:11.

And received us . . .--The word implies both shelter and hospitality. Warmth, above all things, was needful for those who had been chilled and drenched; and for this purpose, probably in some open space, or atrium, a large fire was lighted.

Because of the present rain . . .--The rain followed naturally on the cessation of the gale. The "cold" shows that the wind was not the Sirocco, which is always accompanied by heat.

Verse 2. - Barbarians for barbarous people, A.V.; common for little, A.V.; all for every one, A.V. Barbarians; i.e. not Greeks or Romans, or (in the mouth of a Jew) not Jews. The phrase had especial reference to the strange language of the "barbarian." See St. Paul's use of it (Romans 1:14; 1 Corinthians 14:11; Colossians 3:11); and compare Ovid's saying ('Trist.,' 3:10, 37), "Barbarus hic ego sum, quia non intelligor ulli;" and that of Herodotus (2, 158), that the Egyptians call all barbarians who do not speak the Egyptian language(Kuinoel). The word is thought to be formed onomate-poetically, to express the confused sound which a strange language has in a man's ears. Kindness; φιλανθρωπία, here and Titus 3:4 (comp. Acts 27:3). Received us all. The whole party, numbering two hundred and seventy-six. The present rain, and... cold; showing that the gale still continued, and the wind was still north-east. The plight of the shipwrecked party must have been lamentable, drenched to the skin, with no change of clothes, a cold wind blowing. Probably the hearty meal they had taken on beard ship was the means of saving their lives. 28:1-10 God can make strangers to be friends; friends in distress. Those who are despised for homely manners, are often more friendly than the more polished; and the conduct of heathens, or persons called barbarians, condemns many in civilized nations, professing to be Christians. The people thought that Paul was a murderer, and that the viper was sent by Divine justice, to be the avenger of blood. They knew that there is a God who governs the world, so that things do not come to pass by chance, no, not the smallest event, but all by Divine direction; and that evil pursues sinners; that there are good works which God will reward, and wicked works which he will punish. Also, that murder is a dreadful crime, one which shall not long go unpunished. But they thought all wicked people were punished in this life. Though some are made examples in this world, to prove that there is a God and a Providence, yet many are left unpunished, to prove that there is a judgment to come. They also thought all who were remarkably afflicted in this life were wicked people. Divine revelation sets this matter in a true light. Good men often are greatly afflicted in this life, for the trial and increase of their faith and patience. Observe Paul's deliverance from the danger. And thus in the strength of the grace of Christ, believers shake off the temptations of Satan, with holy resolution. When we despise the censures and reproaches of men, and look upon them with holy contempt, having the testimony of our consciences for us, then, like Paul, we shake off the viper into the fire. It does us no harm, except we are kept by it from our duty. God hereby made Paul remarkable among these people, and so made way for the receiving of the gospel. The Lord raises up friends for his people in every place whither he leads them, and makes them blessings to those in affliction.
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