Acts 20:7
New International Version
On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people and, because he intended to leave the next day, kept on talking until midnight.

New Living Translation
On the first day of the week, we gathered with the local believers to share in the Lord's Supper. Paul was preaching to them, and since he was leaving the next day, he kept talking until midnight.

English Standard Version
On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them, intending to depart on the next day, and he prolonged his speech until midnight.

Berean Study Bible
On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Since Paul was ready to leave the next day, he talked to them and kept on speaking until midnight.

Berean Literal Bible
And on the first day of the week, of us having come together to break bread, Paul, about to depart on the next day, talked to them and continued the talk until midnight.

New American Standard Bible
On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul began talking to them, intending to leave the next day, and he prolonged his message until midnight.

King James Bible
And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.

Christian Standard Bible
On the first day of the week, we assembled to break bread. Paul spoke to them, and since he was about to depart the next day, he kept on talking until midnight.

Contemporary English Version
On the first day of the week we met to break bread together. Paul spoke to the people until midnight because he was leaving the next morning.

Good News Translation
On Saturday evening we gathered together for the fellowship meal. Paul spoke to the people and kept on speaking until midnight, since he was going to leave the next day.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
On the first day of the week, we assembled to break bread. Paul spoke to them, and since he was about to depart the next day, he extended his message until midnight.

International Standard Version
On the first day of the week, when we had met to break bread, Paul began to address the people. Since he intended to leave the next day, he went on speaking until midnight.

NET Bible
On the first day of the week, when we met to break bread, Paul began to speak to the people, and because he intended to leave the next day, he extended his message until midnight.

New Heart English Bible
On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them, intending to depart on the next day, and continued his speech until midnight.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
In the first day of the week, when we assembled to break the Eucharist, Paulus was speaking with them, because the next day he was going to go out by himself and he prolonged speaking until midnight.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
On Sunday we met to break bread. Paul was discussing [Scripture] with the people. Since he intended to leave the next day, he kept talking until midnight.

New American Standard 1977
And on the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul began talking to them, intending to depart the next day, and he prolonged his message until midnight.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And the first of the sabbaths, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart the next day, and continued his word until midnight.

King James 2000 Bible
And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the next day; and continued his speech until midnight.

American King James Version
And on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached to them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.

American Standard Version
And upon the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul discoursed with them, intending to depart on the morrow; and prolonged his speech until midnight.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And on the first day of the week, when we were assembled to break bread, Paul discoursed with them, being to depart on the morrow: and he continued his speech until midnight.

Darby Bible Translation
And the first day of the week, we being assembled to break bread, Paul discoursed to them, about to depart on the morrow. And he prolonged the discourse till midnight.

English Revised Version
And upon the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul discoursed with them, intending to depart on the morrow; and prolonged his speech until midnight.

Webster's Bible Translation
And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached to them (ready to depart on the morrow) and continued his speech until midnight.

Weymouth New Testament
On the first day of the week, when we had met to break bread, Paul, who was going away the next morning, was preaching to them, and prolonged his discourse till midnight.

World English Bible
On the first day of the week, when the disciples were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them, intending to depart on the next day, and continued his speech until midnight.

Young's Literal Translation
And on the first of the week, the disciples having been gathered together to break bread, Paul was discoursing to them, about to depart on the morrow, he was also continuing the discourse till midnight,
Study Bible GRK ▾ 
Eutychus Revived at Troas
6And after the Feast of Unleavened Bread, we sailed from Philippi, and five days later we rejoined them in Troas, where we stayed seven days. 7On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Since Paul was ready to leave the next day, he talked to them and kept on speaking until midnight. 8Now there were many lamps in the upper room where we were gathered.…
Cross References
Acts 2:42
They devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and to the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer.

Acts 2:46
With one accord they continued to meet daily in the temple courts and to break bread from house to house, sharing their meals with gladness and sincerity of heart,

Acts 16:10
As soon as Paul had seen the vision, we got ready to leave for Macedonia, concluding that God had called us to preach the gospel to them.

Acts 20:5
These men went on ahead and waited for us in Troas.

Acts 20:11
Then Paul went back upstairs, broke bread, and ate. After speaking until daybreak, he departed.

1 Corinthians 16:2
On the first day of every week, each of you should set aside a portion of his income, saving it up, so that when I come no collections will be needed.

Revelation 1:10
On the Lord's day I was in the Spirit, and I heard behind me a loud voice like a trumpet,

Treasury of Scripture

And on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached to them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.

the first.

John 20:1,19,26 The first day of the week comes Mary Magdalene early, when it was …

1 Corinthians 16:2 On the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, …

Revelation 1:10 I was in the Spirit on the Lord's day, and heard behind me a great …

the disciples.

1 Corinthians 11:17-21,33,34 Now in this that I declare to you I praise you not, that you come …

to break.

Acts 20:11 When he therefore was come up again, and had broken bread, and eaten, …

Acts 2:42,46 And they continued steadfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, …

Luke 22:19 And he took bread, and gave thanks, and broke it, and gave to them, …

Luke 24:35 And they told what things were done in the way, and how he was known …

1 Corinthians 10:16 The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the …

1 Corinthians 11:20-34 When you come together therefore into one place, this is not to eat …

and continued.

Acts 20:9,11,31 And there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus, being …

Acts 28:23 And when they had appointed him a day, there came many to him into …

Nehemiah 8:3 And he read therein before the street that was before the water gate …

Nehemiah 9:3 And they stood up in their place, and read in the book of the law …

1 Corinthians 15:10 But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed …

2 Timothy 4:2 Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, …







Lexicon
On
Ἐν (En)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

the
τῇ (tē)
Article - Dative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

first [day]
μιᾷ (mia)
Adjective - Dative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1520: One. (including the neuter Hen); a primary numeral; one.

of the
τῶν (tōn)
Article - Genitive Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

week
σαββάτων (sabbatōn)
Noun - Genitive Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 4521: The Sabbath, a week.

we
ἡμῶν (hēmōn)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

came together
συνηγμένων (synēgmenōn)
Verb - Perfect Participle Middle or Passive - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 4863: From sun and ago; to lead together, i.e. Collect or convene; specially, to entertain.

to break
κλάσαι (klasai)
Verb - Aorist Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 2806: To break (in pieces), break bread. A primary verb; to break.

bread.
ἄρτον (arton)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 740: Bread, a loaf, food. From airo; bread or a loaf.

[Since] Paul
Παῦλος (Paulos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3972: Paul, Paulus. Of Latin origin; Paulus, the name of a Roman and of an apostle.

was ready
μέλλων (mellōn)
Verb - Present Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3195: A strengthened form of melo; to intend, i.e. Be about to be, do, or suffer something.

to leave
ἐξιέναι (exienai)
Verb - Present Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 1826: (originally: I shall go out), I go out (away), depart. From ek and eimi; to issue, i.e. Leave, escape.

the
τῇ (tē)
Article - Dative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

next day,
ἐπαύριον (epaurion)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 1887: Tomorrow. From epi and aurion; occurring on the succeeding day, i.e. to-morrow.

he talked
διελέγετο (dielegeto)
Verb - Imperfect Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1256: To converse, address, preach, lecture; I argue, reason. Middle voice from dia and lego; to say thoroughly, i.e. Discuss.

to them
αὐτοῖς (autois)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Dative Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

and
τε (te)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 5037: And, both. A primary particle of connection or addition; both or also.

kept on
παρέτεινέν (pareteinen)
Verb - Imperfect Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 3905: To extend, prolong, continue. From para and teino; to extend along, i.e. Prolong.

speaking
λόγον (logon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3056: From lego; something said; by implication, a topic, also reasoning or motive; by extension, a computation; specially, the Divine Expression.

until
μέχρι (mechri)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 3360: As far as, until, even to.

midnight.
μεσονυκτίου (mesonyktiou)
Noun - Genitive Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 3317: Midnight, the middle of the period between sunset and sunrise. Neuter of compound of mesos and nux; midnight.
(7) Upon the first day of the week . . .--This and the counsel given in 1Corinthians 16:2, are distinct proofs that the Church had already begun to observe the weekly festival of the Resurrection in place of, or, where the disciples were Jews, in addition to, the weekly Sabbath. It lies in the nature of the case that those who were slaves, or freed-men still in service, under heathen masters could not transfer to it the rigid abstinence from labour which characterised the Jewish Sabbath. And on this day they met together, obviously in the evening after sunset, to "break bread." On the half- technical significance of that phrase, as applied specially to the Lord's Supper, the Communion of the Body and Blood of Christ, see Notes on Acts 2:46, and 1Corinthians 10:16. Two further questions, however, present themselves--(1) On what evening was the meeting held? (2) How far was a meal such as was known as the Agape, or Feast of Charity, united with the Lord's Supper? In answer to (1), it seems probable that in churches which were so largely organised on the framework of the Jewish synagogue, and contained so many Jews and proselytes who had been familiar with its usages, the Jewish mode of reckoning would still be kept, and that, as the Sabbath ended at sunset, the first day of the week would begin at sunset on what was then or soon afterwards known as Saturday. In this case, the meeting of which we read would be held on what we should call the Saturday evening, and the feast would present some analogies to the prevalent Jewish custom of eating bread and drinking wine at that time in honour of the departed Sabbath (Jost, Gesch. Judenthums, i. 180). (2) Looking to St. Paul's directions in 1Corinthians 11:33-34, it is probable that the hour of the "breaking bread" became gradually later, so as to allow those who would otherwise have been hungry to take their evening meal at home before they came. The natural result of this arrangement was, as in the instance now before us, to throw the Eucharistic rite forward to midnight, or even later; and, as this was obviously likely to cause both inconvenience and scandal, the next step was to separate it entirely from the Agape, and to celebrate the purely symbolic feast very early in the morning of the first day of the week, while the actual meal came later in the evening of the same day. That this was so in the regions of Troas and Asia we see from Pliny's letter to Trajan (Epp. x. 96), in which he describes the Christians as meeting on "a fixed day," for what he calls a sacramentum at break of day, and again in the evening to partake of a simple and innocent repast. At Troas we have the connecting-link between the evening communion of the Church of Corinth, and the morning celebration which has been for many centuries the universal practice of the Church.

Paul preached unto them.--The fact has a liturgical interest as showing that then, as in the more developed services of the second and third centuries, the sermon, and the lessons from Scripture which it implied, preceded what we now know as the Celebration.

Ready to depart on the morrow.--It may perhaps seem to some strange, taking the view maintained in the previous Note, that the Apostle and his companions should thus purpose to travel on a day to which we have transferred so many of the restrictions of the Jewish Sabbath. But it must be remembered (1) that there is no evidence that St. Paul thought of them as so transferred, but rather the contrary (Galatians 4:10; Colossians 2:16); and (2) that the ship in which his friends had taken their passage was not likely to alter its day of starting to meet their scruples, even had those scruples existed.

Verse 7. - We were gathered for the disciples came, A.V. and T.R.; discoursed with for preached unto, A.V.; intending for ready, A.V.; prolonged for continued, A.V. The first day of the week. This is an important evidence of the keeping of the Lord's day by the Church as a day for their Church assemblies (see Luke 24:1, 30, 35; John 20:19, 26; 1 Corinthians 16:2). To break bread. This is also an important example of weekly communion as the practice of the first Christians. Comparing the phrase, "to break bread," with St. Luke's account of the institution of the Holy Eucharist (Luke 22:19) and the passages just quoted in Luke 24, and St. Paul's language (1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 11:24), it is impossible not to conclude that the breaking of bread in the celebration of the Lord's Supper is an essential part of the holy sacrament, which man may not for any specious reasons omit. Further, this passage seems to indicate that evening Communion, after the example of the first Lord's Supper, was at this time the practice of the Church. It was preceded (see ver. 11) by the preaching of the Word. The following description, given by Justin Martyr, in his second Apology to Antoninus Plus (or Marcus Aurelius), of the Church assemblies in his day, not a hundred years after this time, is in exact agreement with it: - "On the day which is called Sunday, all (Christians) who dwell either in town or country come together to one place. The memoirs of the apostles and the writings of the prophets are read for a certain time, and then the president of the meeting, when the reader has stopped, makes a discourse, in which he instructs and exhorts the people to the imitation of the good deeds of which they have just heard. We then all rise up together, and address prayers (to God); and, when our prayers are ended, bread and wine and water are brought, and the president, to the best of his ability, offers up both prayers and thanksgivings, and the people assent, saving 'Amen.' And then the distribution of the bread and wine, over which the thanksgivings have been offered, is made to all present, and all partake of it." He adds that the elements are carried to the absent by the deacons, and that collections are made for poor widows, and orphans, and sick, and prisoners. Discoursed (διελέγετο); Acts 17:17, note. Prolonged (παρέτεινε). The word is found only here in the New Testament, but is of frequent use in medical writers. 20:7-12 Though the disciples read, and meditated, and prayed, and sung apart, and thereby kept up communion with God, yet they came together to worship God, and so kept up their communion with one another. They came together on the first day of the week, the Lord's day. It is to be religiously observed by all disciples of Christ. In the breaking of the bread, not only the breaking of Christ's body for us, to be a sacrifice for our sins, is remembered, but the breaking of Christ's body to us, to be food and a feast for our souls, is signified. In the early times it was the custom to receive the Lord's supper every Lord's day, thus celebrating the memorial of Christ's death. In this assembly Paul preached. The preaching of the gospel ought to go with the sacraments. They were willing to hear, he saw they were so, and continued his speech till midnight. Sleeping when hearing the word, is an evil thing, a sign of low esteem of the word of God. We must do what we can to prevent being sleepy; not put ourselves to sleep, but get our hearts affected with the word we hear, so as to drive sleep far away. Infirmity requires tenderness; but contempt requires severity. It interrupted the apostle's preaching; but was made to confirm his preaching. Eutychus was brought to life again. And as they knew not when they should have Paul's company again, they made the best use of it they could, and reckoned a night's sleep well lost for that purpose. How seldom are hours of repose broken for the purposes of devotion! but how often for mere amusement or sinful revelry! So hard is it for spiritual life to thrive in the heart of man! so naturally do carnal practices flourish there!
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Alphabetical: and because began bread break came day first gathered he his intended intending kept leave message midnight next of On Paul people prolonged spoke talking the them to together until we week were when

NT Apostles: Acts 20:7 On the first day of the week (Acts of the Apostles Ac) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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