Luke 18:3
Parallel Verses
New International Version
And there was a widow in that town who kept coming to him with the plea, 'Grant me justice against my adversary.'

New Living Translation
A widow of that city came to him repeatedly, saying, 'Give me justice in this dispute with my enemy.'

English Standard Version
And there was a widow in that city who kept coming to him and saying, ‘Give me justice against my adversary.’

New American Standard Bible
"There was a widow in that city, and she kept coming to him, saying, 'Give me legal protection from my opponent.'

King James Bible
And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
And a widow in that town kept coming to him, saying, Give me justice against my adversary.'

International Standard Version
In that city there was also a widow who kept coming to him and saying, 'Grant me justice against my adversary.'

NET Bible
There was also a widow in that city who kept coming to him and saying, 'Give me justice against my adversary.'

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
“There was a certain widow in that city, and she was coming to him and saying, 'Vindicate me of my legal adversary.' “

GOD'S WORD® Translation
In that city there was also a widow who kept coming to him and saying, 'Give me justice.'

Jubilee Bible 2000
and there was a widow in that city, and she came unto him, saying, Defend me from my adversary.

King James 2000 Bible
And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of my adversary.

American King James Version
And there was a widow in that city; and she came to him, saying, Avenge me of my adversary.

American Standard Version
and there was a widow in that city; and she came oft unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And there was a certain widow in that city, and she came to him, saying: Avenge me of my adversary.

Darby Bible Translation
and there was a widow in that city, and she came to him, saying, Avenge me of mine adverse party.

English Revised Version
and there was a widow in that city; and she came oft unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.

Webster's Bible Translation
And there was a widow in that city; and she came to him, saying, Avenge me of my adversary.

Weymouth New Testament
And in the same town was a widow who repeatedly came and entreated him, saying, "'Give me justice and stop my oppressor.'

World English Bible
A widow was in that city, and she often came to him, saying, 'Defend me from my adversary!'

Young's Literal Translation
and a widow was in that city, and she was coming unto him, saying, Do me justice on my opponent,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

18:1-8 All God's people are praying people. Here earnest steadiness in prayer for spiritual mercies is taught. The widow's earnestness prevailed even with the unjust judge: she might fear lest it should set him more against her; but our earnest prayer is pleasing to our God. Even to the end there will still be ground for the same complaint of weakness of faith.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 3. - And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary. The petitioner was a woman and a widow, the latter being in the East a synonym for helplessness. With no one to defend her or plead her cause, this widow was ever a prey to the covetous. Not once nor twice in the noble generous words of the chivalrous Hebrew prophets we find this readiness on the part of those in power to neglect, if not to oppress these helpless widow-women, sternly commented upon. So in Isaiah we read (Isaiah 1:23), "They judge not the fatherless, neither doth the cause of the widow come unto them." While Jesus (Matthew 23:14) includes this cowardly sin among the evil deeds of the rulers of the Israel of his day: "Ye devour widows' houses, and for a pretence make long prayer." A more desperate situation, as regards any hope of obtaining the object of her earnest prayer, could not well be pictured - a careless, corrupt judge of the lawless Herod period for the tribunal in Israel, and a poor helpless widow for the suppliant. The forlorn woman of the parable represents the Church or people of God in dire straits, overborne by an unbelieving world and seemingly forgotten even of their God. The story is a reminder that there is hope even in that extreme situation sketched in the parable, if the petitioner only continues persistent in her prayer. The argument which lies on the surface of the parable, teaching is obvious: if such a judge will in the end listen to the prayer of a suppliant for whom he cares nothing, will not God surely listen to the repeated prayer of a suppliant whom he loves with a deep, enduring love? Such is the argument of the story. Importunity, it seems to say, must inevitably triumph. But underlying this there is much deep teaching, of which, perhaps, the most important item is that it insists upon the urgent necessity for us all to continue in prayer, never fainting in this exercise though no answer seems to come. "The whole limb of the faithful," as Origen once grandly said, "should be one great connected prayer." That is the real moral of the story; but there are a number of minor bits of Divine teaching contained in this curious parable setting, as we shall see. Avenge me of mine adversary. We must not suppose that mere vengeance in the vulgar sense is what the widow prayed for; that would be of no use to her; all she wanted was that the judge should deliver her from the oppression which her adversary exercised over her, no doubt in keeping from her the heritage to which she was lawfully entitled. Of course, the granting her prayer would revolve loss and possibly punishment to her fraudulent oppressor.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

And there was a widow in that city,.... Poor and helpless, and none among men to counsel, direct, and assist her, and take her part: now as in the accommodation of this parable, the elect of God answer to this widow; such an one is rather pitched upon to represent the helpless, desolate, and forlorn condition they are in among men in this world, though they are espoused to one husband, Christ; and especially to signify the state and condition of God's elect among the Jews in those sad times, before the destruction of Jerusalem, this parable has respect unto. Christ is the bridegroom of his church and people; he is their husband, the Lord of hosts is his name; and they are espoused as a chaste virgin to him; and whilst he was here on earth, his disciples, who were the children of the bridegroom, could not fast and mourn, for which they had no reason; but upon the death of Christ, when he was removed from them, they had great sorrow of heart; they were left like widows and orphans; hence those words of Christ, John 14:18 and were persecuted by the Jews in their own land; and wherever they went, they stirred up the Gentiles against them; and so things continued till near the destruction of Jerusalem; during which time many a request was made to God, the judge of the widows and fatherless, to the following purport:

and she came unto him, saying, avenge me of my adversary; or do me justice in the cause depending between me, and him that has wronged me; hear the cause, and do right; vindicate, and deliver me. Many are the adversaries of God's people, as the sins and corruptions of their own hearts, Satan, and his angels, wicked oppressors, and persecutors; the last seem, in the mystical sense, to be designed here: it is lawful to pray for vengeance on them; it is right to apply to God, and leave it with him, to whom it belongs; and it has been the suit and cry of the best of men; see Revelation 6:9. It does not become the people of God to avenge themselves, even when it is in the power of their hands; nor should they desire it for their own sakes, so much as for the glory of God; they should ask it, not to gratify a revengeful spirit in them, but for the honour or divine justice; and this should be always with submission to the will of God, leaving it to his own time and way, to whom vengeance belongs, and who has said it is mine, and I will repay it; as he certainly will sooner or later: the purity of his nature, his abhorrence of sin, and sinful men, and his love to his own people engage him to it.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

3. came—kept coming. See Lu 18:5, "her continual coming."

Avenge me—that is, rid me of the oppression of.

Luke 18:3 Additional Commentaries
Context
Parable of the Persistent Widow
2saying, "In a certain city there was a judge who did not fear God and did not respect man. 3"There was a widow in that city, and she kept coming to him, saying, 'Give me legal protection from my opponent.' 4"For a while he was unwilling; but afterward he said to himself, 'Even though I do not fear God nor respect man,…
Cross References
Matthew 5:25
"Settle matters quickly with your adversary who is taking you to court. Do it while you are still together on the way, or your adversary may hand you over to the judge, and the judge may hand you over to the officer, and you may be thrown into prison.

Luke 18:2
He said: "In a certain town there was a judge who neither feared God nor cared what people thought.

Luke 18:4
"For some time he refused. But finally he said to himself, 'Even though I don't fear God or care what people think,

Luke 18:5
yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will see that she gets justice, so that she won't eventually come and attack me!'"
Treasury of Scripture

And there was a widow in that city; and she came to him, saying, Avenge me of my adversary.

a widow.

Deuteronomy 27:19 Cursed be he that perverts the judgment of the stranger, fatherless, …

2 Samuel 14:5 And the king said to her, What ails you? And she answered, I am indeed …

Job 22:9 You have sent widows away empty, and the arms of the fatherless have …

Job 29:13 The blessing of him that was ready to perish came on me: and I caused …

Isaiah 1:17,21-23 Learn to do well; seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the …

Jeremiah 5:28 They are waxen fat, they shine: yes, they overpass the deeds of the …

Avenge.

Luke 18:7,8 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night to …

Romans 13:3,4 For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Will …

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