Matthew 27:2
New International Version
So they bound him, led him away and handed him over to Pilate the governor.

New Living Translation
Then they bound him, led him away, and took him to Pilate, the Roman governor.

English Standard Version
And they bound him and led him away and delivered him over to Pilate the governor.

Berean Study Bible
They bound Him, led Him away, and handed Him over to Pilate the governor.

Berean Literal Bible
And having bound Him, they led Him away and delivered Him to Pilate the governor.

New American Standard Bible
and they bound Him, and led Him away and delivered Him to Pilate the governor.

King James Bible
And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.

Christian Standard Bible
After tying him up, they led him away and handed him over to Pilate, the governor.

Contemporary English Version
They tied him up and led him away to Pilate the governor.

Good News Translation
They put him in chains, led him off, and handed him over to Pilate, the Roman governor.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
After tying Him up, they led Him away and handed Him over to Pilate, the governor.

International Standard Version
They bound him with chains, led him away, and handed him over to Pontius Pilate, the governor.

NET Bible
They tied him up, led him away, and handed him over to Pilate the governor.

New Heart English Bible
and they bound him, and led him away, and delivered him to Pilate, the governor.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And they bound him and they led him and delivered him to Pilate, the Governor.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
They tied him up, led him away, and handed him over to Pilate, the governor.

New American Standard 1977
and they bound Him, and led Him away, and delivered Him up to Pilate the governor.

Jubilee Bible 2000
and when they had bound him, they led him away and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.

King James 2000 Bible
And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.

American King James Version
And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.

American Standard Version
and they bound him, and led him away, and delivered him up to Pilate the governor.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And they brought him bound, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.

Darby Bible Translation
And having bound him they led him away, and delivered him up to Pontius Pilate, the governor.

English Revised Version
and they bound him, and led him away, and delivered him up to Pilate the governor.

Webster's Bible Translation
And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.

Weymouth New Testament
and binding Him they led Him away and handed Him over to Pilate the Governor.

World English Bible
and they bound him, and led him away, and delivered him up to Pontius Pilate, the governor.

Young's Literal Translation
and having bound him, they did lead away, and delivered him up to Pontius Pilate, the governor.
Study Bible
Jesus Delivered to Pilate
1When morning came, all the chief priests and elders of the people conspired against Jesus to put Him to death. 2They bound Him, led Him away, and handed Him over to Pilate the governor. 3When Judas, who had betrayed Him, saw that Jesus was condemned, he was filled with remorse and returned the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders.…
Cross References
Matthew 20:19
and will deliver Him to the Gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified. And on the third day He will be raised to life."

Matthew 28:14
If this report reaches the governor, we will satisfy him and keep you out of trouble."

Luke 3:1
In the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, while Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, Herod tetrarch of Galilee, his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilene,

Luke 13:1
At that time, some of those present told Jesus about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mixed with their sacrifices.

Luke 20:20
So they watched Him closely and sent spies who pretended to be sincere. They were hoping to catch Him in His words in order to hand Him over to the rule and authority of the governor.

Luke 23:1
Then the whole council rose and led Jesus away to Pilate.

Luke 23:12
That day Herod and Pilate became friends; before this time they had been enemies.

John 18:28
Then they led Jesus away from Caiaphas into the Praetorium. By now it was early morning, and the Jews did not enter the Praetorium to avoid being defiled and unable to eat the Passover.

Acts 3:13
The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the God of our fathers, has glorified His servant Jesus. You handed Him over and rejected Him before Pilate, even though he had decided to release Him.

Acts 4:27
In fact, this is the very city where Herod and Pontius Pilate conspired with the Gentiles and the people of Israel against Your holy servant Jesus, whom You anointed.

1 Timothy 6:13
I charge you in the presence of God, who gives life to all things, and of Christ Jesus, who made the good confession in His testimony before Pontius Pilate:

Treasury of Scripture

And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.

bound.

Genesis 22:9
And they came to the place which God had told him of; and Abraham built an altar there, and laid the wood in order, and bound Isaac his son, and laid him on the altar upon the wood.

John 18:12,24
Then the band and the captain and officers of the Jews took Jesus, and bound him, …

Acts 9:2
And desired of him letters to Damascus to the synagogues, that if he found any of this way, whether they were men or women, he might bring them bound unto Jerusalem.

delivered.

Matthew 20:19
And shall deliver him to the Gentiles to mock, and to scourge, and to crucify him: and the third day he shall rise again.

Luke 18:32,33
For he shall be delivered unto the Gentiles, and shall be mocked, and spitefully entreated, and spitted on: …

Luke 20:20
And they watched him, and sent forth spies, which should feign themselves just men, that they might take hold of his words, that so they might deliver him unto the power and authority of the governor.

Pontius Pilate.

Matthew 27:36
And sitting down they watched him there;







Lexicon
They bound
δήσαντες (dēsantes)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 1210: To bind, tie, fasten; I impel, compel; I declare to be prohibited and unlawful. A primary verb; to bind.

Him,
αὐτὸν (auton)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Accusative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

led [Him] away,
ἀπήγαγον (apēgagon)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 520: To lead, carry, take away; met: To be led astray, seduced. From apo and ago; to take off.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

handed [Him] over to
παρέδωκαν (paredōkan)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 3860: From para and didomi; to surrender, i.e yield up, intrust, transmit.

Pilate
Πιλάτῳ (Pilatō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4091: Pilate. Of Latin origin; close-pressed, i.e. Firm; Pilatus, a Roman.

the
τῷ (tō)
Article - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

governor.
ἡγεμόνι (hēgemoni)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2232: From hegeomai; a leader, i.e. Chief person of a province.
(2) Pontius Pilate.--It may be well to bring together the chief known facts as to the previous history of the Governor, or more accurately, the Procurator, of Judaea, whose name is conspicuous as occupying a solitary prominence in the creeds of Christendom. He must have belonged, by birth or adoption, to the gens of the Pontii, one of whom, C. Pontius Telesinus, had been the leader of the Samnites in their second and third wars against Rome B.C. 321-292. The cognomen Pilatus means "armed with the pilum or javelin," and may have had its origin in some early military achievement. As applied, however, to Mount Pilatus in Switzerland, it has been conjectured that it is a contracted form of Pileatus, from pilea a cap, and is applied to the mountain as having for the most part, a cloud-capped summit. When Judaea became formally subject to the empire, on the deposition of Archelaus, a procurator, or collector of revenue, invested with judicial power, was appointed to govern it, subject to the Governor of Syria (Luke 2:2), and resided commonly at Caesarea. Pontius Pilate, of whose previous career we know nothing, was appointed, A.D. 25-26, as the sixth holder of that office. His administration had already, prior to our Lord's trial, been marked by a series of outrages on Jewish feelings. (1) He had removed the head-quarters of his army from Caesarea to Jerusalem, and the troops brought their standards with the image of the emperor into the Holy City. The people were excited into frenzy, and rushed in crowds to Caesarea to implore him to spare them this outrage on their religion. After five days of obstinacy and a partial attempt to suppress the tumult, Pilate at last yielded (Jos. Ant. xvii. 3, ?? 1, 2; Wars, ii. 9, ?? 2-4). (2) He had hung up in his palace at Jerusalem gilt shields inscribed with the names of heathen deities, and would not remove them till an express order came from Tiberius (Philo, Leg. ad Caium, c. 38). (3) He had taken money from the Corban, or treasury of the Temple, for the construction of an aqueduct. This led to another tumult, which was suppressed by the slaughter not of the rioters only, but also of casual spectators (Jos. Wars, ii. 9, ? 4). (4) Lastly, on some unknown occasion, he had slain some Galileans while they were in the very act of sacrificing (Luke 13:1), and this had probably caused the ill-feeling between him and the tetrarch Antipas mentioned in Luke 23:12. It is well to bear in mind these antecedents of the man, as notes of character, as we follow him through the series of vacillations which we now have to trace.

Verse 2. - When they had bound him. With his hands tied by a rope behind his back. This was the treatment inflicted on condemned malefactors. During the actual official proceedings it was customary to release the accused person from bonds; hence this new binding was necessary. What passed in the council before this indignity was inflicted is, perhaps, told by St. Luke: the Sanhedrists satisfied themselves that they had a case against Jesus sufficient for their purpose, and they proceeded in a body to lay it before the governor. Pontius Pilate the governor (τῷ ἡγεμόνι). Some good manuscripts omit "Pontius," as in Mark and Luke; but there seems to be no doubt that he bore this nomen gentilicium (see e.g. Tacitus, 'Ann.,' 15:44), which connected him with the Samnite gens of the Pontii. He was the sixth Roman Procurator of Judaea, and his title in Greek was ἐπίτροπος rather than ἡγεμών, which was a more general term for a commander or chief possessing more extensive powers. He held the office under the Prefect of Syria for ten years, at the end of which time he was removed for cruelty and extortion, and banished to Vienne, in Gaul, where he put an end to his own life. The turbulence and national animosity of the Jews had rendered it necessary to invest the procurator with the power of life and death, which he used in the most unscrupulous manner, so that he was universally hated and feared. The quarters of the Roman governor were called the Praetorium, and to this Christ was led. Pilate usually resided at Caesarea, but came to Jerusalem at the great festival, to be ready to quell any fanatical outbreak that might occur. So nowadays the Turks keep a body of troops in the same city to preserve the peace between Christian worshippers at Easter(!). Whether Pilate occupied the barracks at the fortress Antonia, or the magnificent palace of Herod, situated at the northwest angle of the upper city, is uncertain; but as we know that the Roman procurators did reside in Herod's palace, and as on this occasion Pilate was accompanied by his wife (ver. 19), it is most probable that he took up his abode in the latter, and that Jesus was brought before him there. Herod had a house of his own on the east of Zion, opposite the castle, which he seems to have occupied more often than his father's palace, thus leaving the latter at the pleasure of the Roman governors. Assuming this to be the case, Dr. Edersheim writes, "From the slope of the eastern angle, opposite the temple mount, where the palace of Caiaphas stood, up the narrow streets of the upper city, the melancholy procession wound to the portals of the grand palace of Herod. It is recorded that they who brought him would not themselves enter the portals of the palace, 'that they might not be defiled, but might eat the Passover'" ('Life and Times of Jesus,' 2:505). 27:1-10 Wicked men see little of the consequences of their crimes when they commit them, but they must answer for them all. In the fullest manner Judas acknowledged to the chief priests that he had sinned, and betrayed an innocent person. This was full testimony to the character of Christ; but the rulers were hardened. Casting down the money, Judas departed, and went and hanged himself, not being able to bear the terror of Divine wrath, and the anguish of despair. There is little doubt but that the death of Judas was before that of our blessed Lord. But was it nothing to them that they had thirsted after this blood, and hired Judas to betray it, and had condemned it to be shed unjustly? Thus do fools make a mock at sin. Thus many make light of Christ crucified. And it is a common instance of the deceitfulness of our hearts, to make light of our own sin by dwelling upon other people's sins. But the judgment of God is according to truth. Many apply this passage of the buying the piece of ground, with the money Judas brought back, to signify the favour intended by the blood of Christ to strangers, and sinners of the Gentiles. It fulfilled a prophecy, Zec 11:12. Judas went far toward repentance, yet it was not to salvation. He confessed, but not to God; he did not go to him, and say, I have sinned, Father, against heaven. Let none be satisfied with such partial convictions as a man may have, and yet remain full of pride, enmity, and rebellion.
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