Galatians 3:15
New International Version
Brothers and sisters, let me take an example from everyday life. Just as no one can set aside or add to a human covenant that has been duly established, so it is in this case.

New Living Translation
Dear brothers and sisters, here’s an example from everyday life. Just as no one can set aside or amend an irrevocable agreement, so it is in this case.

English Standard Version
To give a human example, brothers: even with a man-made covenant, no one annuls it or adds to it once it has been ratified.

Berean Study Bible
Brothers, let me put this in human terms. Even a human covenant, once it is ratified, cannot be canceled or amended.

Berean Literal Bible
Brothers, I am speaking according to man. No one sets aside or adds thereto a covenant even of man, having been ratified.

New American Standard Bible
Brethren, I speak in terms of human relations: even though it is only a man's covenant, yet when it has been ratified, no one sets it aside or adds conditions to it.

New King James Version
Brethren, I speak in the manner of men: Though it is only a man’s covenant, yet if it is confirmed, no one annuls or adds to it.

King James Bible
Brethren, I speak after the manner of men; Though it be but a man's covenant, yet if it be confirmed, no man disannulleth, or addeth thereto.

Christian Standard Bible
Brothers and sisters, I'm using a human illustration. No one sets aside or makes additions to a validated human will.

Contemporary English Version
My friends, I will use an everyday example to explain what I mean. Once someone agrees to something, no one else can change or cancel the agreement.

Good News Translation
My friends, I am going to use an everyday example: when two people agree on a matter and sign an agreement, no one can break it or add anything to it.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Brothers, I'm using a human illustration. No one sets aside or makes additions to even a human covenant that has been ratified.

International Standard Version
Brothers, let me use an example from everyday life. Once a person's will has been ratified, no one can cancel it or add conditions to it.

NET Bible
Brothers and sisters, I offer an example from everyday life: When a covenant has been ratified, even though it is only a human contract, no one can set it aside or add anything to it.

New Heart English Bible
Brothers, I am speaking in human terms. Though it is only a human covenant, once it has been ratified, no one annuls it or adds to it.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
My brethren, I speak as among men, that a man does not reject or change anything in a man's covenant which has been confirmed.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Brothers and sisters, let me use an example from everyday life. No one can cancel a person's will or add conditions to it once that will is put into effect.

New American Standard 1977
Brethren, I speak in terms of human relations: even though it is only a man’s covenant, yet when it has been ratified, no one sets it aside or adds conditions to it.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Brethren, (I speak after the manner of men) Even when a covenant is of man, once it is confirmed, no one cancels it or adds to it.

King James 2000 Bible
Brethren, I speak after the manner of men; Though it be but a man's covenant, yet if it be confirmed, no man disannuls, or adds thereto.

American King James Version
Brothers, I speak after the manner of men; Though it be but a man's covenant, yet if it be confirmed, no man cancels, or adds thereto.

American Standard Version
Brethren, I speak after the manner of men: Though it be but a man's covenant, yet when it hath been confirmed, no one maketh it void, or addeth thereto.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Brethren (I speak after the manner of man,) yet a man's testament, if it be confirmed, no man despiseth, nor addeth to it.

Darby Bible Translation
Brethren, (I speak according to man,) even man's confirmed covenant no one sets aside, or adds other dispositions to.

English Revised Version
Brethren, I speak after the manner of men: Though it be but a man's covenant, yet when it hath been confirmed, no one maketh it void, or addeth thereto.

Webster's Bible Translation
Brethren, I speak after the manner of men; Though it is but a man's covenant, yet if it is confirmed, no man disannulleth or addeth to it.

Weymouth New Testament
Brethren, even a covenant made by a man--to borrow an illustration from daily life--when once formally sanctioned is not liable to be set aside or added to.

World English Bible
Brothers, speaking of human terms, though it is only a man's covenant, yet when it has been confirmed, no one makes it void, or adds to it.

Young's Literal Translation
Brethren, as a man I say it, even of man a confirmed covenant no one doth make void or doth add to,
Study Bible
The Purpose of the Law
14He redeemed us in order that the blessing promised to Abraham would come to the Gentiles in Christ Jesus, so that by faith we might receive the promise of the Spirit. 15Brothers, let me put this in human terms. Even a human covenant, once it is ratified, cannot be canceled or amended. 16The promises were spoken to Abraham and to his seed. The Scripture does not say, “and to seeds,” meaning many, but “and to your seed,” meaning One, who is Christ.…
Cross References
Acts 1:15
In those days Peter stood up among the brothers (a gathering of about a hundred and twenty) and said,

Romans 1:13
I do not want you to be unaware, brothers, how often I planned to come to you (but have been prevented from visiting until now), in order that I might have a harvest among you, just as I have had among the other Gentiles.

Romans 3:5
But if our unrighteousness highlights the righteousness of God, what shall we say? That God is unjust to inflict His wrath on us? I am speaking in human terms.

Galatians 6:18
The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit, brothers. Amen.

Hebrews 6:13
When God made His promise to Abraham, since He had no one greater to swear by, He swore by Himself,

Hebrews 6:16
Men swear by someone greater than themselves, and their oath serves as a confirmation to end all argument.

Treasury of Scripture

Brothers, I speak after the manner of men; Though it be but a man's covenant, yet if it be confirmed, no man cancels, or adds thereto.

I speak.

Romans 6:19
I speak after the manner of men because of the infirmity of your flesh: for as ye have yielded your members servants to uncleanness and to iniquity unto iniquity; even so now yield your members servants to righteousness unto holiness.

1 Corinthians 15:32
If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what advantageth it me, if the dead rise not? let us eat and drink; for to morrow we die.

it be.

Hebrews 9:17
For a testament is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.

covenant.







Lexicon
Brothers,
Ἀδελφοί (Adelphoi)
Noun - Vocative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

let me put this
λέγω (legō)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 3004: (a) I say, speak; I mean, mention, tell, (b) I call, name, especially in the pass., (c) I tell, command.

in human terms.
κατὰ (kata)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 2596: A primary particle; down, in varied relations (genitive, dative or accusative) with which it is joined).

Even
ὅμως (homōs)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 3676: Yet, nevertheless, even. Adverb from the base of homou; at the same time, i.e. notwithstanding, yet still.

a human covenant,
διαθήκην (diathēkēn)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1242: From diatithemai; properly, a disposition, i.e. a contract.

once it is ratified,
κεκυρωμένην (kekyrōmenēn)
Verb - Perfect Participle Middle or Passive - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2964: To ratify, confirm, make valid, reaffirm, assure. From the same as kurios; to make authoritative, i.e. Ratify.

cannot
οὐδεὶς (oudeis)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3762: No one, none, nothing.

be canceled
ἀθετεῖ (athetei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 114: From a compound of a and a derivative of tithemi; to set aside, i.e. to disesteem, neutralize or violate.

or
(ē)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2228: Or, than. A primary particle of distinction between two connected terms; disjunctive, or; comparative, than.

amended.
ἐπιδιατάσσεται (epidiatassetai)
Verb - Present Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1928: To make an additional testamentary disposition, To furnish with additions.
(15-18) To take an illustration from purely human relations. A covenant once ratified is binding. It cannot be treated as if it did not exist, neither can fresh clauses be added to it. Now the covenant and promise made to Abraham (by the terms in which it was made) could point to no one but the Messiah. That covenant remained unaffected by the Law, which was four hundred and thirty years subsequent to it in point of date. Law and promise are two totally different and mutually exclusive things. But the covenant with Abraham was given by promise. The Law, therefore, had nothing to do with it.

(15) I speak after the manner of men.--The figure that I am going to use is one taken from the ordinary civil relations between man and man, and therefore, it is left to be inferred, supplies an a fortiori argument in things relating to God, for men may change and break the most solemn engagements; God is absolutely faithful and unchangeable. The phrase translated "I speak after the manner of men" is found in the same, or a very similar form, in Romans 3:5; Romans 6:19; 1Corinthians 9:8, where see the Notes.

Though it be but a man's covenant.--This is well rendered in the Authorised version. A covenant, even though it is only between two men--though it is regulated by the provisions only of human law--does not admit of alteration or addition after it has once been signed and sealed; much more a covenant which depends on God.

Covenant.--The word thus translated is that which gave its name to the "Old and New Testaments," where a more correct rendering would be the "Old and New Covenants." The word has both senses. It meant originally a "disposition" or "settlement," and hence came, on the one hand, to be confined to a "testamentary disposition," while, on the other hand, it was taken to mean a settlement arrived at by agreement between two parties. The first sense is that most commonly found in classical writers; the second is used almost entirely in the LXX. and New Testament. The one exception is in Hebrews 9:15-17, where the idea of "covenant" glides into that of "testament," the argument rather turning upon the double meaning of the word.

Addeth thereto.--Adds new clauses or conditions. Such new clauses could only be added by a second covenant. The reason why the Apostle introduces this point is that the Law might be supposed to restrict the bearings of the promise. It might be thought to add certain new and limiting conditions, without compliance with which the blessings of the promise could not be obtained. This was the position of the Judaising party, against which St. Paul is arguing.

Verse 15. - Brethren, I speak after the manner of men (ἀδελφοί κατὰ ἄνθρωπον λέγω). "Brethren." The tone of indignant reproach with which the chapter opened has gradually subsided in the course of the apostle's argument; so that here he appeals to the Galatian Churchmen as "brethren; ' as if to bespeak their candid attention to the consideration he is about to allege. "I speak after the manner of men." I say it as stating a principle commonly recognized in human life, in respect to contracts between man and man (see note on the phrase, Galatians 1:11). In a similar manner, in Hebrews 6:16, 17 the writer refers to human methods of ratifying solemn engagements, in order to illustrate a course of proceeding on another occasion condescendingly adopted by God. Though it be but a man's covenant, yet if it be (when it hath been) confirmed, no man disannulleth, or addeth thereto (ὅμως ἀνθρώπου κεκυρωμένην διαθήκην οὐδεὶς ἀθετεῖ η} ἐπιδιατάσσεται). The Authorized Version has thus happily rendered the ὅμως, which is here transposed cut of its logical position, as it is also in 1 Corinthians 14:7, and as ἔτι is in Romans 5:6. The apostle's meaning is that, if even men are constrained by their sense of justice to abide by this rule, much more may the All-righteous One be expected to do so. This a fortiori suggestion (for St. Paul only hints this consideration by introducing the word ὅμως without explicitly developing it) is similar to the afortiori argument more explicitly stated by our Lord with reference to God's justice, in Luke 18:6, 7; and to his fatherliness, in Luke 11:13. "Covenant." The word διαθήκη, properly "disposition," which, in classical Greek, generally means "will," "testament," is used in the Septuagint to render the Hebrew berith, covenant, in which sense it occurs once in Aristophanes, 'Ayes,' 439; and it appears to denote "covenant" in all the thirty-three places in which it is found in the New Testament; for even Hebrews 9:17 can hardly be allowed to be an exception. Bishop Lightfoot observes that the Septuagint translators and the New Testament writers probably preferred διαθήκη to συνθήκη, the ordinary Greek word for "covenant," when speaking of a Divine dispensation, because, like "promise," it better expresses the free grace of God. Perhaps the terms appeared to them more suitable also in this application, because one of the parties to the engagement was no other than the supreme sovereign Disposer of all things. "Confirmed;" ratified; as it were, signed, sealed, and delivered. "No one;" meaning neither of the two covenanting parties. "Addeth thereto;" addeth any fresh condition, such as would clog the action of the previous engagement. The apostle adds this with reference to the supposition that the Law of Moses might have qualified the Abrahamic covenant by limiting its benefits to persons ceremonially clean. 3:15-18 The covenant God made with Abraham, was not done away by the giving the law to Moses. The covenant was made with Abraham and his Seed. It is still in force; Christ abideth for ever in his person, and his spiritual seed, who are his by faith. By this we learn the difference between the promises of the law and those of the gospel. The promises of the law are made to the person of every man; the promises of the gospel are first made to Christ, then by him to those who are by faith ingrafted into Christ. Rightly to divide the word of truth, a great difference must be put between the promise and the law, as to the inward affections, and the whole practice of life. When the promise is mingled with the law, it is made nothing but the law. Let Christ be always before our eyes, as a sure argument for the defence of faith, against dependence on human righteousness.
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Alphabetical: a add adds an as aside been Brethren Brothers can case conditions covenant duly established even everyday example from has human I in is it Just let life man's me no of one only or ratified relations set sets so speak take terms that this though to when yet

NT Letters: Galatians 3:15 Brothers speaking of human terms though it (Gal. Ga) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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