Acts 28:13
New International Version
From there we set sail and arrived at Rhegium. The next day the south wind came up, and on the following day we reached Puteoli.

New Living Translation
From there we sailed across to Rhegium. A day later a south wind began blowing, so the following day we sailed up the coast to Puteoli.

English Standard Version
And from there we made a circuit and arrived at Rhegium. And after one day a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli.

Berean Study Bible
From there we weighed anchor and came to Rhegium. After one day, a south wind came up, and on the second day we arrived at Puteoli.

Berean Literal Bible
from where having gone around, we arrived at Rhegium. And after one day a south wind having come on, on the second day we came to Puteoli,

New American Standard Bible
From there we sailed around and arrived at Rhegium, and a day later a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli.

King James Bible
And from thence we fetched a compass, and came to Rhegium: and after one day the south wind blew, and we came the next day to Puteoli:

Christian Standard Bible
From there, after making a circuit along the coast, we reached Rhegium. After one day a south wind sprang up, and the second day we came to Puteoli.

Contemporary English Version
From there we sailed to Rhegium. The next day a south wind began to blow, and two days later we arrived in Puteoli.

Good News Translation
From there we sailed on and arrived in the city of Rhegium. The next day a wind began to blow from the south, and in two days we came to the town of Puteoli.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
From there, after making a circuit along the coast, we reached Rhegium. After one day a south wind sprang up, and the second day we came to Puteoli.

International Standard Version
Then we weighed anchor and came to Rhegium. A day later, a south wind began to blow, and on the second day we came to Puteoli.

NET Bible
From there we cast off and arrived at Rhegium, and after one day a south wind sprang up and on the second day we came to Puteoli.

New Heart English Bible
From there we cast off and arrived at Rhegium. After one day, a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And from there, we traveled around and came to the city, Rhegion; after one day, the wind blew for us from the south and in two days we came to Putielos, a city of Italia.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
We sailed from Syracuse and arrived at the city of Rhegium. The next day a south wind began to blow, and two days later we arrived at the city of Puteoli.

New American Standard 1977
And from there we sailed around and arrived at Rhegium, and a day later a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And having gone around, we came to Rhegium, and after one day the south wind blew, and we came the next day to Puteoli,

King James 2000 Bible
And from there we set a course, and came to Rhegium: and after one day the south wind blew, and we came the next day to Puteoli:

American King James Version
And from there we fetched a compass, and came to Rhegium: and after one day the south wind blew, and we came the next day to Puteoli:

American Standard Version
And from thence we made a circuit, and arrived at Rhegium: and after one day a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli;

Douay-Rheims Bible
From thence, compassing by the shore, we came to Rhegium: and after one day, the south wind blowing, we came the second day to Puteoli;

Darby Bible Translation
Whence, going in a circuitous course, we arrived at Rhegium; and after one day, the wind having changed to south, on the second day we came to Puteoli,

English Revised Version
And from thence we made a circuit, and arrived at Rhegium: and after one day a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli:

Webster's Bible Translation
And from thence we made a circuit, and came to Rhegium: and after one day the south wind blew, and we came the next day to Puteoli:

Weymouth New Testament
From there we came round and reached Rhegium; and a day later, a south wind sprang up which brought us by the evening of the next day to Puteoli.

World English Bible
From there we circled around and arrived at Rhegium. After one day, a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli,

Young's Literal Translation
thence having gone round, we came to Rhegium, and after one day, a south wind having sprung up, the second day we came to Puteoli;
Study Bible GRK ▾ 
Paul Arrives in Italy
12Putting in at Syracuse, we stayed there three days. 13From there we weighed anchor and came to Rhegium. After one day, a south wind came up, and on the second day we arrived at Puteoli. 14There we found some brothers who invited us to spend the week with them. And so we came to Rome.…
Cross References
Acts 28:12
Putting in at Syracuse, we stayed there three days.

Acts 28:14
There we found some brothers who invited us to spend the week with them. And so we came to Rome.

Treasury of Scripture

And from there we fetched a compass, and came to Rhegium: and after one day the south wind blew, and we came the next day to Puteoli:

Rhegium. Rhegium, now Reggio, was a maritime city and promontory in Italy, opposite Messina.

the south.

Acts 27:13 And when the south wind blew softly, supposing that they had obtained …

Puteoli. Puteoli, now Puzzuoli, is an ancient sea-port of Campania, in the kingdom of Naples, about eight miles S.W. of that city, standing upon a hill in a creek opposite to Baiae.







Lexicon
From [there]
ὅθεν (hothen)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3606: From hos with the directive enclitic of source; from which place or source or cause.

we weighed anchor
περιελόντες (perielontes)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 4014: From peri and haireomai; to remove all around, i.e. Unveil, cast off; figuratively, to expiate.

and came
κατηντήσαμεν (katēntēsamen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 2658: From kata and a derivative of anti; to meet against, i.e. Arrive at.

to
εἰς (eis)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1519: A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.

Rhegium.
Ῥήγιον (Rhēgion)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 4484: Of Latin origin; Rhegium, a place in Italy.

After
μετὰ (meta)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 3326: (a) gen: with, in company with, (b) acc: (1) behind, beyond, after, of place, (2) after, of time, with nouns, neut. of adjectives.

one
μίαν (mian)
Adjective - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1520: One. (including the neuter Hen); a primary numeral; one.

day,
ἡμέραν (hēmeran)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2250: A day, the period from sunrise to sunset.

a south wind
νότου (notou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3558: The south wind, the South. Of uncertain affinity; the south(-west) wind; by extension, the southern quarter itself.

came up,
ἐπιγενομένου (epigenomenou)
Verb - Aorist Participle Middle - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 1920: To arise, spring up, arrive, come on. From epi and ginomai; to arrive upon, i.e. Spring up.

[and] on the second day
δευτεραῖοι (deuteraioi)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 1206: Adj. where English requires an adv., on the second day, on the next day. From deuteros; secondary, i.e. on the second day.

we arrived
ἤλθομεν (ēlthomen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 2064: To come, go.

at
εἰς (eis)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1519: A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.

Puteoli.
Ποτιόλους (Potiolous)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 4223: Of Latin origin; little wells, i.e. Mineral springs; Potioli, a place in Italy.
(13) From thence we fetched a compass.--The phrase, now somewhat obsolete, was formerly in common use for a circuitous route by land or sea from one point to another. (Comp. 2Samuel 5:23; 2Kings 3:9, and--

"For 'tis his custom, like a creeping fool,

To fetch a compass of a mile about, "

in Heywood's Fair Maid of the Exchange, ii. 3.) It is found in most of the English versions, but Wiclif gives "we sailed about," and the Rhemish, "compassing by the shore." The latter, however, hardly expresses the fact, which was that the wind being probably from the west, they were compelled to tack so as to stand out from the shore to catch the breeze, instead of coasting.

Came to Rhegium.--This town, now Reggio, was in Italy, on the southern opening of the Straits of Messina. Ships from Alexandria to Italy commonly touched there, and Suetonius relates that the Emperor Titus, taking the same course as St. Paul, put in there on his way from Judaea to Puteoli, and thence to Rome. Caligula began the construction of a harbour at Rhegium for the corn-ships of Egypt; but this work, which the Jewish historian notes as the one "great and kingly undertaking" of his reign, was left unfinished (Ant. xix. 2, ? 5).

The south wind blew.--More accurately, when a breeze from, the south had sprung, the form of the Greek verb implying a change of wind. The south wind was, of course, directly in their favour, and they sailed without danger between the famous rocks of Scylla and the whirlpool of Charybdis.

We came the next day to Puteoli.--As the distance was about one hundred and eighty miles, the ship was clearly making good way before the wind. Puteoli (more anciently Dikaearchia, now Pozzuoli) lies in a sheltered recess, forming the northern part of the Bay of Naples. It was at this time the chief port of Rome, and was, in particular, the great emporium for the corn ships of Alexandria, upon which the people of Rome largely depended for their food, and the arrival of which was accordingly eagerly welcomed. A pier on twenty-five arches was thrown out into the sea for the protection of the harbour. It may be noted further that but a few months prior to St. Paul's arrival it had been raised to the dignity of a colonia (Tac. Ann. xiv. 27). It is hardly necessary to describe the well-known beauties of the bay, but the reader may be reminded that as the ship entered it the eye of St. Paul must have rested on the point of Misenum, to the north, behind which was stationed the imperial fleet; on Vesuvius, to the south; on the town of Neapolis (= New-town), now Naples, which had taken the place of the old Parthenope; on the islands of Capreae, Ischia, and Procida.

Verse 13. - Made a circuit for fetched a compass, A.V.; arrived at for came to, A.V.; a south for the south, A.V.; sprang up for blew, A.V.; on the second day we came for we came the next day, A.V. We made a circuit; περιελθόντες. St. Luke only uses this word in one other passage, Acts 19:13," The strolling [or, 'vagabond'] Jews;" and it has the same sense of "wandering" in the only other passages where it occurs in the New Testament (1 Timothy 5:13; Hebrews 11:37). If it is the right reading here, the meaning must be "tacking," the wind not allowing them to sail in a direct course. "I am inclined to suppose that the wind was north-west, and that they worked to windward, availing themselves of the sinuosities of the coast. But with this wind they could not proceed through the Straits of Messina .... They were, therefore, obliged to put into Rhegium But after one day the wind became fair (from the south), and on the following day they arrived at Puteoli, having accomplished about one hundred and eighty nautical miles in less than two days" (Smith, p. 156). But Meyer explains it, "after we had come round," viz. from Syracuse, round the eastern coast of Sicily. Lewin thinks they had to stand out to sea to catch the wind, and so arrived at Rhegium by a circuitous course. The other reading is περιελόντες, as in Acts 27:40; but this seems to give no proper sense here. A south wind sprang up. The force of the preposition in ἐπιγενομένου shows that there was a change of wind. The south wind would, of course, be a very favorable one for sailing from Reggio to Puzzuoli. Hobart remarks of ἐπιγίνεσθαι (which is also found in Acts 27:27, according to some good manuscripts) that it "was a favorite medical word constantly employed to denote the coming on of an attack of illness." It occurs nowhere else in the New Testament, but is common in Diodorus Siculus, Xenophon, Herodotus, Thucydides, etc., for the coming on of a storm, wind (adverse or favorable), or any other change. On the second day; δευτεραῖοι. This particular numeral occurs nowhere else in the New Testament, but the analogous τεταρταῖος is used in John 11:39. And Herodotus has τριταῖος ἀφίκετο, "he went away on the third day." Τριταῖος is also common in medical writers with πυρετός, a tertian ague, a fever that recurs on the third day; τεταρταῖος, a quartan fever; πεμπταῖος, one recurring on the fifth day; ἑβδομαῖος, on the seventh day; ἐνναταῖος, on the ninth day. The forms δεκαταῖος πεντηκοσταῖος, etc., "doing anything on the tenth, the fiftieth day," also occur. Puteoli; now Puzzuoli. The Italian port to which ships from Alexandria usually came. Smith quotes a passage from Seneca (Epist., 77) describing the arrival of the Alexandrian wheat-ships at Puteoli. The whole population of Puteoli went out to see them sail into harbor with their topsails (supparum), which they alone were allowed to carry, in order to hasten their arrival (p. 157), so important to Italy was the corn trade with Alexandria. 28:11-16 The common events of travelling are seldom worthy of being told; but the comfort of communion with the saints, and kindness shown by friends, deserve particular mention. The Christians at Rome were so far from being ashamed of Paul, or afraid of owning him, because he was a prisoner, that they were the more careful to show him respect. He had great comfort in this. And if our friends are kind to us, God puts it into their hearts, and we must give him the glory. When we see those even in strange places, who bear Christ's name, fear God, and serve him, we should lift up our hearts to heaven in thanksgiving. How many great men have made their entry into Rome, crowned and in triumph, who really were plagues to the world! But here a good man makes his entry into Rome, chained as a poor captive, who was a greater blessing to the world than any other merely a man. Is not this enough to put us for ever out of conceit with worldly favour? This may encourage God's prisoners, that he can give them favour in the eyes of those that carry them captives. When God does not soon deliver his people out of bondage, yet makes it easy to them, or them easy under it, they have reason to be thankful.
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Alphabetical: a and around arrived at came day following From later next on Puteoli reached Rhegium sail sailed second set south sprang The there to up we wind

NT Apostles: Acts 28:13 From there we circled around and arrived (Acts of the Apostles Ac) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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