Acts 27:4
New International Version
From there we put out to sea again and passed to the lee of Cyprus because the winds were against us.

New Living Translation
Putting out to sea from there, we encountered strong headwinds that made it difficult to keep the ship on course, so we sailed north of Cyprus between the island and the mainland.

English Standard Version
And putting out to sea from there we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were against us.

Berean Study Bible
After putting out from there, we sailed to the lee of Cyprus because the winds were against us.

Berean Literal Bible
And having set sail from there, we sailed under Cyprus because of the winds being contrary.

New American Standard Bible
From there we put out to sea and sailed under the shelter of Cyprus because the winds were contrary.

King James Bible
And when we had launched from thence, we sailed under Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Christian Standard Bible
When we had put out to sea from there, we sailed along the northern coast of Cyprus because the winds were against us.

Contemporary English Version
When we left Sidon, the winds were blowing against us, and we sailed close to the island of Cyprus to be safe from the wind.

Good News Translation
We went on from there, and because the winds were blowing against us, we sailed on the sheltered side of the island of Cyprus.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
When we had put out to sea from there, we sailed along the northern coast of Cyprus because the winds were against us.

International Standard Version
After putting out from there, we sailed on the sheltered side of Cyprus because the winds were against us.

NET Bible
From there we put out to sea and sailed under the lee of Cyprus because the winds were against us.

New Heart English Bible
Putting to sea from there, we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And from there we sailed, and because the wind was against us, we went around unto Cyprus.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Leaving Sidon, we sailed on the northern side of the island of Cyprus because we were traveling against the wind.

New American Standard 1977
And from there we put out to sea and sailed under the shelter of Cyprus because the winds were contrary.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And when we had launched from there, we sailed under Cyprus because the winds were contrary.

King James 2000 Bible
And when we had put to sea from there, we sailed close to Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

American King James Version
And when we had launched from there, we sailed under Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

American Standard Version
And putting to sea from thence, we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And when we had launched from thence, we sailed under Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Darby Bible Translation
And setting sail thence we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

English Revised Version
And putting to sea from thence, we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Webster's Bible Translation
And when we had lanched from thence, we sailed under Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Weymouth New Testament
Putting to sea again, we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were against us;

World English Bible
Putting to sea from there, we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Young's Literal Translation
And thence, having set sail, we sailed under Cyprus, because of the winds being contrary,
Study Bible
Paul Sails for Rome
3The next day we landed at Sidon, and Julius treated Paul with consideration, allowing him to visit his friends and receive their care. 4After putting out from there, we sailed to the lee of Cyprus because the winds were against us. 5And when we had sailed across the open sea off the coast of Cilicia and Pamphylia, we came to Myra in Lycia.…
Cross References
Matthew 14:24
but the boat was already far from land, buffeted by the waves because the wind was against it.

Luke 8:22
One day Jesus said to His disciples, "Let us cross to the other side of the lake." So He got into a boat with them and set out.

Acts 4:36
Joseph, a Levite from Cyprus, whom the apostles called Barnabas (meaning Son of Encouragement),

Acts 27:7
After sailing slowly for many days, we arrived off Cnidus. When the wind impeded us, we sailed to the lee of Crete, opposite Salmone.

Treasury of Scripture

And when we had launched from there, we sailed under Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.

Cyprus.

Acts 4:36 And Joses, who by the apostles was surnamed Barnabas, (which is, …

Acts 11:19,20 Now they which were scattered abroad on the persecution that arose …

Acts 13:4 So they, being sent forth by the Holy Ghost, departed to Seleucia; …

Acts 15:39 And the contention was so sharp between them, that they departed …

Acts 21:3,16 Now when we had discovered Cyprus, we left it on the left hand, and …

the winds.

Matthew 14:24 But the ship was now in the middle of the sea, tossed with waves: …

Mark 6:48 And he saw them toiling in rowing; for the wind was contrary to them: …







Lexicon
[After] putting out
ἀναχθέντες (anachthentes)
Verb - Aorist Participle Passive - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 321: From ana and ago; to lead up; by extension to bring out; specially, to sail away.

from there,
κἀκεῖθεν (kakeithen)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2547: And thence, and from there; and then afterwards. From kai and ekeithen; likewise from that place.

we sailed to the lee
ὑπεπλεύσαμεν (hypepleusamen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 5284: To sail under. From hupo and pleo; to sail under the lee of.

of Cyprus
Κύπρον (Kypron)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2954: Cyprus. Of uncertain origin; Cyprus, an island in the Mediterranean.

because
διὰ (dia)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

the
τοὺς (tous)
Article - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

winds
ἀνέμους (anemous)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 417: The wind; fig: applied to empty doctrines. From the base of aer; wind; by implication, quarters.

were
εἶναι (einai)
Verb - Present Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 1510: I am, exist. The first person singular present indicative; a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist.

against us.
ἐναντίους (enantious)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 1727: Opposite, opposed, contrary; the adversary. From enanti; opposite; figuratively, antagonistic.
(4) We sailed under Cyprus . . .--Had the wind been favourable, the ship would naturally have taken the direct course from Sidon to Mysia, leaving Cyprus on the right, as in his previous voyage St. Paul had sailed from Patara to Tyre (Acts 21:1). As it was, the wind probably being from the north-west, they made for the channel between Cyprus and Cilicia, and, sailing close under the lee of the long, projecting east coast of the island from Salamis to the promontory of Dinaretium (Capo Andrea), were thus sheltered.

Verse 4. - Putting to sea (ἀνάχθεντες, see ver. 3, note) for when we had launched, A.V.; under the lee of for under, A.V. We sailed under the lee of; ὑπεπλεύσαμεν, only here and ver. 7. A nautical term, very rarely met with. The winds were contrary. The wind apparently was westerly, the prevalent wind at that season of the year. Smith ('Voyage and Shipwreck of St. Paul') quotes Admiral De Saumarez as writing from near Cyprus, "The westerly winds invariably prevail at this season;" and M. De Page, a French navigator, as saying, "The winds from the west which prevail in these places (Cyprus) forced us to run to the north." This is exactly what the ship in which Paul sailed did. Instead of going in a westerly direction, and leaving Cyprus on her right, she turned due north, having Cyprus on her left. It was now late in August (Farrar, p. 363). 27:1-11 It was determined by the counsel of God, before it was determined by the counsel of Festus, that Paul should go to Rome; for God had work for him to do there. The course they steered, and the places they touched at, are here set down. And God here encourages those who suffer for him, to trust in him; for he can put it into the hearts of those to befriend them, from whom they least expect it. Sailors must make the best of the wind: and so must we all in our passage over the ocean of this world. When the winds are contrary, yet we must be getting forward as well as we can. Many who are not driven backward by cross providences, do not get forward by favourable providences. And many real Christians complain as to the concerns of their souls, that they have much ado to keep their ground. Every fair haven is not a safe haven. Many show respect to good ministers, who will not take their advice. But the event will convince sinners of the vanity of their hopes, and the folly of their conduct.
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Alphabetical: again against and because contrary Cyprus From lee of out passed put sailed sea shelter the there to under us we were winds

NT Apostles: Acts 27:4 Putting to sea from there we sailed (Acts of the Apostles Ac) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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