Acts 27:14
New International Version
Before very long, a wind of hurricane force, called the Northeaster, swept down from the island.

New Living Translation
But the weather changed abruptly, and a wind of typhoon strength (called a "northeaster") burst across the island and blew us out to sea.

English Standard Version
But soon a tempestuous wind, called the northeaster, struck down from the land.

Berean Study Bible
But it was not long before a cyclone called the Northeaster swept down across the island.

Berean Literal Bible
But not long after, there came down from it a tempestuous wind called the Northeaster.

New American Standard Bible
But before very long there rushed down from the land a violent wind, called Euraquilo;

King James Bible
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

Christian Standard Bible
But before long, a fierce wind called the "northeaster" rushed down from the island.

Contemporary English Version
But soon a strong wind called "The Northeaster" blew against us from the island.

Good News Translation
But soon a very strong wind--the one called "Northeaster"--blew down from the island.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
But not long afterward, a fierce wind called the "northeaster" rushed down from the island.

International Standard Version
But it was not long before a violent wind (called a northeaster) swept down from the island.

NET Bible
Not long after this, a hurricane-force wind called the northeaster blew down from the island.

New Heart English Bible
But before long, a stormy wind beat down from shore, which is called Euraquilo.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And after a little while, the wind of a hurricane came upon us called “Typhoniqos Euroqlydon”.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Soon a powerful wind (called a northeaster) blew from the island.

New American Standard 1977
But before very long there rushed down from the land a violent wind, called Euraquilo;

Jubilee Bible 2000
But not long after, there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon. {devastating cold north wind from Europe}

King James 2000 Bible
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

American King James Version
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

American Standard Version
But after no long time there beat down from it a tempestuous wind, which is called Euraquilo:

Douay-Rheims Bible
But not long after, there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroaquilo.

Darby Bible Translation
But not long after there came down it a hurricane called Euroclydon.

English Revised Version
But after no long time there beat down from it a tempestuous wind, which is called Euraquilo:

Webster's Bible Translation
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

Weymouth New Testament
But it was not long before a furious north-east wind, coming down from the mountains, burst upon us and carried the ship out of her course.

World English Bible
But before long, a stormy wind beat down from shore, which is called Euroclydon.

Young's Literal Translation
and not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, that is called Euroclydon,
Study Bible
The Storm at Sea
13When a gentle south wind began to blow, they thought they had their opportunity. So they weighed anchor and sailed along, hugging the coast of Crete. 14But it was not long before a cyclone called the Northeaster swept down across the island. 15Unable to head into the wind, the ship was caught up. So we gave way and let ourselves be driven along.…
Cross References
Ezekiel 27:26
Your oarsmen have brought you onto the high seas, but the east wind will shatter you in the heart of the sea.

Mark 4:37
Soon a violent windstorm came up, and the waves were breaking over the boat, so that it was being swamped.

Acts 27:15
Unable to head into the wind, the ship was caught up. So we gave way and let ourselves be driven along.

Treasury of Scripture

But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

not.

Exodus 14:21-27
And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the LORD caused the sea to go back by a strong east wind all that night, and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided…

Jonah 1:3-5
But Jonah rose up to flee unto Tarshish from the presence of the LORD, and went down to Joppa; and he found a ship going to Tarshish: so he paid the fare thereof, and went down into it, to go with them unto Tarshish from the presence of the LORD…

arose, or beat.

Psalm 107:25-27
For he commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind, which lifteth up the waves thereof…

Ezekiel 27:26
Thy rowers have brought thee into great waters: the east wind hath broken thee in the midst of the seas.

Matthew 8:24
And, behold, there arose a great tempest in the sea, insomuch that the ship was covered with the waves: but he was asleep.

Euroclydon.







Lexicon
But
δὲ (de)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1161: A primary particle; but, and, etc.

[it was] not
οὐ (ou)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3756: No, not. Also ouk, and ouch a primary word; the absolute negative adverb; no or not.

long
πολὺ (poly)
Adjective - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 4183: Much, many; often.

[before]
μετ’ (met’)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 3326: (a) gen: with, in company with, (b) acc: (1) behind, beyond, after, of place, (2) after, of time, with nouns, neut. of adjectives.

a cyclone
τυφωνικὸς (typhōnikos)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 5189: Violent, tempestuous, stormy. From a derivative of tupho; stormy.

called
καλούμενος (kaloumenos)
Verb - Present Participle Middle or Passive - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2564: (a) I call, summon, invite, (b) I call, name. Akin to the base of keleuo; to 'call'.

the Northeaster
Εὐρακύλων (Eurakylōn)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2148: An east-north-east wind. From Euros and kludon; a storm from the East, i.e. a Levanter.

swept
ἔβαλεν (ebalen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 906: (a) I cast, throw, rush, (b) often, in the weaker sense: I place, put, drop. A primary verb; to throw.

down across
κατ’ (kat’)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 2596: A primary particle; down, in varied relations (genitive, dative or accusative) with which it is joined).

[the island].
αὐτῆς (autēs)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Feminine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.
(14) There arose against it . . .--The Greek pronoun is in the feminine, and as the noun used for ship is, throughout the narrative, in the neuter, the difference of gender presents a difficulty. Grammatically the pronoun seems to refer to Crete, and if referred to it, the sentence admits of three possible constructions: (1) the wind drove us against Crete; or (2), blew against Crete; or (3), drove down on us from Crete. Of these, (1) and (2) are at variance with the facts of the case, as the gale blew the ship away from Crete to the south, while (3), which is as tenable grammatically, exactly agrees with them. Some translators (e.g., Luther) have, however, referred the pronoun to the noun "purpose,"--"the wind blew against their purpose;" but this gives a less satisfactory sense. Of the English versions Wiclif gives "was against it," leaving the sense ambiguous. Tyndale and Cranmer follow Luther, "there arose against their purpose." The Geneva adopts the first of the above readings, "there arose against Candie," and is followed by the Rhemish, "drove against it."

A tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.--The Greek adjective typhonic is perpetuated in the modern "typhoon," as applied to whirlwinds like that now described. The "vortex" of such a wind is indeed its distinguishing feature. The name Euroclydon, which is fairly represented by such a word as "wide-wave," or "broad-billow," is not found elsewhere, and, if the reading be genuine, must be looked on as a term which St. Luke reported as actually used by the sailors on board. Some of the best MSS., however, give the form Euro-aquilo, which, though a somewhat hybrid word unknown to Greek and Latin writers, fits in, as meaning north-east, or, more strictly, east by north, with all the phenomena described. The earlier English--Wiclif, Tyndale, Cranmer, and the Geneva--all give "north-east," while the Rhemish reproduces the term Euro-aquilo, without attempting to translate. A sudden change from south to north, with a great increase of violence, is a common phenomenon in the autumnal storms of the Mediterranean, and in this instance the blast would seem to have rushed down on the ship from the hills of Crete.

Verse 14. - After no long time for not long after, A.V.; beat down from for arose against, A.V.; which is called Euraquilo for called Euroclydon, A.V. and T.B. There beat down from it (ἔβαλε κατ αὐτῆς). The meaning of this somewhat difficult phrase clearly is that given by Alford and Howson, and, on second thoughts, by Smith, viz. that a violent squall from the north-east beat down the heights and through the valleys of the island, becoming more violent when they had passed Cape Matala, and compelled them to alter their course, and run south-west before the wind towards the island of Clauda; ἔβαλεν in a neuter sense, "struck," or "beat," or "fell," as in Homer (see Liddell and Scott). Κατ αὐτῆς. Farrar thinks it "certain" that the right rendering is "against her," viz. the ship, because ἔβαλεν could not be used with nothing to follow it," 1.e. he thinks you must say ἔβαλεν κατὰ something. But as πλοῖον is the word used for the ship, not ναῦς, it seems very difficult to suppose that Luke could say αὐτῆς, and not αὐτοῦ. It is better, therefore, to refer ἀὐτῆς to Κρήτη, and either to understand it "down it," like κατ Οὐλύμποιο καρήνων, "down the heights of Olympus;" κατὰ πέτρης, "down the rock," etc., or simply "against it," as in the A.V., which obviates Dr. Farrar's objection. If taken in the sense of "down" there is the same idea of a squall "rushing down" from the hills into the lake, in Luke 8:23; and again in ver. 33 of the same chapter St. Luke tells us how the swine rushed κατὰ τοῦ κρημνοῦ, "down the steep," into the lake. A tempestuous wind; ἄνεμος τυφωνικός, only here, and not found in Greek writers; but the substantive τυφώς τυφῶνος, is common for a "furious storm" or "whirlwind." Euraquilo. Compounded - after the analogy of Euronotus, the south-east wind - of Eurus, the east wind, and Aquilo, the north wind, both Latin words (like Corns, in ver. 12), though Eurus is also Greek. This reading of the R.T. is supported by the Vulgate, and by "Lachmann, Bornemann, Ewald, J. Smith, Hackett, Bentley, Olshausen, after Erasmus, Grotius, Mill, Bengel, and others" (Meyer), and by Wordsworth, Alford, Lid-dell and Scott, Factor. On the other hand, Meyer, Tischendorf, Dean Howson, and others support the reading of the T.R. Αὐροκλύδων, and Lewis is doubtful. The derivation of Euroelydon would be from Αῦρος, and κλύδων, a wave. Whatever its name was, it must have been a north-easter. Psalm evil. 25 naturally arises to one's remembrance, with its fine description of a storm at sea. 27:12-20 Those who launch forth on the ocean of this world, with a fair gale, know not what storms they may meet with; and therefore must not easily take it for granted that they have obtained their purpose. Let us never expect to be quite safe till we enter heaven. They saw neither sun nor stars for many days. Thus melancholy sometimes is the condition of the people of God as to their spiritual matters; they walk in darkness, and have no light. See what the wealth of this world is: though coveted as a blessing, the time may come when it will be a burden; not only too heavy to be carried safely, but heavy enough to sink him that has it. The children of this world can be prodigal of their goods for the saving their lives, yet are sparing of them in works of piety and charity, and in suffering for Christ. Any man will rather make shipwreck of his goods than of his life; but many rather make shipwreck of faith and a good conscience, than of their goods. The means the sailors used did not succeed; but when sinners give up all hope of saving themselves, they are prepared to understand God's word, and to trust in his mercy through Jesus Christ.
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