Isaiah 23:7
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
Is this your city of revelry, the old, old city, whose feet have taken her to settle in far-off lands?

New Living Translation
Is this silent ruin all that is left of your once joyous city? What a long history was yours! Think of all the colonists you sent to distant places.

English Standard Version
Is this your exultant city whose origin is from days of old, whose feet carried her to settle far away?

New American Standard Bible
Is this your jubilant city, Whose origin is from antiquity, Whose feet used to carry her to colonize distant places?

King James Bible
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days? her own feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Is this your jubilant city, whose origin was in ancient times, whose feet have taken her to settle far away?

International Standard Version
Is this your exciting city, that was founded long ago, whose feet carried her to settle in far-off lands?

NET Bible
Is this really your boisterous city whose origins are in the distant past, and whose feet led her to a distant land to reside?

New Heart English Bible
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days, whose feet carried her far away to travel?

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Is this your bustling city founded in the distant past? Is this the city that sent its people to settle in distant lands?

JPS Tanakh 1917
Is this your joyous city, Whose feet in antiquity, In ancient days, Carried her afar off to sojourn?

New American Standard 1977
Is this your jubilant city,
            Whose origin is from antiquity,
            Whose feet used to carry her to colonize distant places?

Jubilee Bible 2000
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days? Her own feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn.

King James 2000 Bible
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days? her own feet shall carry her afar off to dwell.

American King James Version
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days? her own feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn.

American Standard Version
Is this your joyous city , whose antiquity is of ancient days, whose feet carried her afar off to sojourn?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Is not this your city, which gloried from of old in her antiquity? her feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn.

Darby Bible Translation
Is this your joyous [city], whose antiquity is of ancient days? Her feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn.

English Revised Version
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days, whose feet carried her afar off to sojourn?

Webster's Bible Translation
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days? her own feet shall carry her far off to sojourn.

World English Bible
Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days, whose feet carried her far away to travel?

Young's Literal Translation
Is this your exulting one? From the days of old is her antiquity, Carry her do her own feet afar off to sojourn.
Study Bible
The Fall of Tyre
6Pass over to Tarshish; Wail, O inhabitants of the coastland. 7Is this your jubilant city, Whose origin is from antiquity, Whose feet used to carry her to colonize distant places? 8Who has planned this against Tyre, the bestower of crowns, Whose merchants were princes, whose traders were the honored of the earth?…
Cross References
Isaiah 22:2
You who were full of noise, You boisterous town, you exultant city; Your slain were not slain with the sword, Nor did they die in battle.

Isaiah 32:13
For the land of my people in which thorns and briars shall come up; Yea, for all the joyful houses and for the jubilant city.
Treasury of Scripture

Is this your joyous city, whose antiquity is of ancient days? her own feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn.

your

Isaiah 22:2 You that are full of stirs, a tumultuous city, joyous city: your …

whose

Joshua 19:29 And then the coast turns to Ramah, and to the strong city Tyre; and …

her own

Isaiah 47:1,2 Come down, and sit in the dust, O virgin daughter of Babylon, sit …

Ecclesiastes 10:7 I have seen servants on horses, and princes walking as servants on the earth.

afar off. Heb. from afar off

(7) Is this your joyous city . . .?--Tyre was, as has been said, of later origin than Zidon, but was the oldest of the daughter cities. Josephus (Ant. viii. 3. 1) fixes the date of its foundation at 240 years before Solomon.

Her own feet shall carry her.--The English version (tenable grammatically) points to the wanderings of exile. Another rendering, her feet are wont to carry her . . . is also legitimate, and fits in better with the context, which paints the past glory of Tyre in contrast with her coming calamities. So taken, the words point to her numerous colonies, of which Carthage was the chief.

Verse 7. - Is this your joyous city? literally, your joyous one; i.e. Can this wretched heap of ruins be the rich and joyous Tyre? Whose antiquity is of ancient days. Though regarded as less ancient than Zidon (Justin, 18:3), Tyro nevertheless claimed a very remote antiquity. Herodotus was told (about B.C. 450) that its temple of Hercules (Melkarth) had been built two thousand three hundred years previously (Herod., 2:44). Q. Curtius makes the city to have been founded by Agenor, the father of Cadmus, who was supposed to have lived three hundred years before the Trojan War ('Vit. Alex.,' 4:4). It must be noted, however, on the other hand, that there is no mention at all of Tyro in Homer, and none in Scripture until the time of Joshua (Joshua 19:29), about B.C. 1300. Her own feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn (so Lowth, Rosenmüller, Gesenius, Ewald, Kay). Others render the passage, "whose feet were wont to carry her afar off to sojourn." In the one case the coming flight and exile, in the other the past commercial enterprise of the city, is pointed at. Is this your joyous city?.... Which the other day looked so gay, brisk, and cheerful, through the number of its inhabitants, largeness of trade, fullness of provisions, and pleasures of every kind; and now distressed and desolate, and no voice of joy and gladness heard in it:

whose antiquity is of ancient days; the most ancient city in Phoenicia, excepting Zidon, as Strabo (w) says; and it was in being in the days of Joshua, Joshua 19:29 if the words there are rightly rendered; and if so, Josephus must be mistaken, unless he speaks of insular Tyre, when he says (x), that from the building of Tyre to the building of the temple (of Solomon) were two hundred and forty years, which must fall very short of the times of Joshua; such (y) seem to be nearer the truth, who make Agenor, the father of Cadmus, to be the builder of this city, who lived about the times of Joshua. The Tyrians indeed boasted of a still greater antiquity, and to which boasts perhaps reference is here had; for one of the priests of Tyre told Herodotus (z) that their city had been inhabited two thousand three hundred years; and Herodotus lived in the times of Artaxerxes and Xerxes, about the year of the world 3500. According to Sanchoniatho (a), it was inhabited by Hypsuranius, who first built cottages of rushes, &c. in it; but these things are beyond all credit; however, certain it is that it was a very ancient city; it had the name of Palaetyrus, or old Tyre:

her own feet shall carry her afar off to sojourn; the sense is, that though the Tyrians had lived very delicately, and in great affluence, while their city was flourishing, yet now they should be very coarsely and roughly used; they should not ride on horses, or be drawn in carriages, but should be obliged to walk on foot, and be led or driven into a foreign country, Assyria or Chaldea, or to some province or provinces belonging to that empire; where they should be, not as inhabitants, but as sojourners and strangers; and should be used, not as freemen, but as captives and slaves. Grotius, by "her feet", understands the feet of her ships, sails and oars, and mariners themselves, by means of which she got into distant places, for safety; and so it is reported in history (b), that the Tyrians being long besieged by Nebuchadnezzar, and having no hopes of being delivered, prepared a convenient number of ships, abandoned their city, transported themselves, wives, children, and riches, and sailed from thence to Cyprus, Carthage, and other maritime cities of their tributaries, or confederates; so that the Babylonians, when they took the city, found little or nothing in it; see Ezekiel 29:18 though the words will bear another sense, being, according to the accents, to be read in connection with the preceding clauses, thus, "Is this the joyous city? from the first days of her antiquity her feet brought unto her inhabitants from afar to sojourn"; that is, by her labour and pains, by her journeys and voyages for the sake of merchandise, which may be meant by her feet, she brought a great number of persons to sojourn in her (c).

(w) Geograph. l. 16. p. 520. (x) Antiqu. l. 8. c. 3. sect. 1.((y) Curtius, l. 4. c. 4. (z) Herodot. l. 2. c. 44. (a) Apud Euseb. Prepar. Evangel. l. 1. p. 35. (b) See Sir Walter Raleigh's History of the World: l. 2. c. 7. sect. 3. p. 198. (c) Reinbeck. de Accent. Heb. p. 399. 7. Is this silent ruin all that is left of your once joyous city (Isa 23:12)?

antiquity—The Tyrian priests boasted in Herodotus' time that their city had already existed 2300 years: an exaggeration, but still implying that it was ancient even then.

her own feet—walking on foot as captives to an enemy's land.23:1-14 Tyre was the mart of the nations. She was noted for mirth and diversions; and this made her loth to consider the warnings God gave by his servants. Her merchants were princes, and lived like princes. Tyre being destroyed and laid waste, the merchants should abandon her. Flee to shift for thine own safety; but those that are uneasy in one place, will be so in another; for when God's judgments pursue sinners, they will overtake them. Whence shall all this trouble come? It is a destruction from the Almighty. God designed to convince men of the vanity and uncertainty of all earthly glory. Let the ruin of Tyre warn all places and persons to take heed of pride; for he who exalts himself shall be abased. God will do it, who has all power in his hand; but the Chaldeans shall be the instruments.
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