2 Corinthians 11:21
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
To my shame I admit that we were too weak for that! Whatever anyone else dares to boast about--I am speaking as a fool--I also dare to boast about.

New Living Translation
I'm ashamed to say that we've been too "weak" to do that! But whatever they dare to boast about--I'm talking like a fool again--I dare to boast about it, too.

English Standard Version
To my shame, I must say, we were too weak for that! But whatever anyone else dares to boast of—I am speaking as a fool—I also dare to boast of that.

Berean Study Bible
To my shame I concede that we were too weak for that! Speaking as a fool, however, I can match what anyone else dares to boast about.

Berean Literal Bible
I speak as to dishonor, as that we have been weak! But in whatever anyone might dare--I speak in foolishness--I also am daring.

New American Standard Bible
To my shame I must say that we have been weak by comparison. But in whatever respect anyone else is bold-- I speak in foolishness-- I am just as bold myself.

King James Bible
I speak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. Howbeit whereinsoever any is bold, (I speak foolishly,) I am bold also.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
I say this to our shame: We have been weak. But in whatever anyone dares to boast--I am talking foolishly--I also dare:

International Standard Version
I am ashamed to admit it, but we have been too weak for that. Whatever anyone else dares to claim—I am talking like a fool—I can claim it, too.

NET Bible
(To my disgrace I must say that we were too weak for that!) But whatever anyone else dares to boast about (I am speaking foolishly), I also dare to boast about the same thing.

New Heart English Bible
I speak by way of disparagement, as though we had been weak. Yet however any is bold (I speak in foolishness), I am bold also.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
I speak as one in dishonor, as if we are poor through stupidity. I say that in all things that a man presumes, I also presume.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
I'm ashamed to admit it, but Timothy and I don't have the strength to do those things to you. Whatever other people dare to brag about, I, like a fool, can also brag about.

New American Standard 1977
To my shame I must say that we have been weak by comparison. But in whatever respect anyone else is bold (I speak in foolishness), I am just as bold myself.

Jubilee Bible 2000
I speak as concerning the reproach, as though we had been weak. Howbeit in that in which another is bold, (I speak foolishly), I am bold also.

King James 2000 Bible
I speak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. But in whatsoever way any is bold, (I speak foolishly,) I am bold also.

American King James Version
I speak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. However, when ever any is bold, (I speak foolishly,) I am bold also.

American Standard Version
I speak by way of disparagement, as though we had been weak. Yet whereinsoever any is bold (I speak in foolishness), I am bold also.

Douay-Rheims Bible
I speak according to dishonour, as if we had been weak in this part. Wherein if any man dare (I speak foolishly), I dare also.

Darby Bible Translation
I speak as to dishonour, as though we had been weak; but wherein any one is daring, (I speak in folly,) I also am daring.

English Revised Version
I speak by way of disparagement, as though we had been weak. Yet whereinsoever any is bold (I speak in foolishness), I am bold also.

Webster's Bible Translation
I speak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. But in whatever respect any is bold, (I speak foolishly) I am bold also.

Weymouth New Testament
I use the language of self-disparagement, as though I were admitting our own feebleness. Yet for whatever reason any one is 'courageous' --I speak in mere folly--I also am courageous.

World English Bible
I speak by way of disparagement, as though we had been weak. Yet however any is bold (I speak in foolishness), I am bold also.

Young's Literal Translation
in reference to dishonour I speak, how that we were weak, and in whatever any one is bold -- in foolishness I say it -- I also am bold.
Study Bible
Paul's Suffering and Service
20In fact, you even put up with anyone who enslaves you or exploits you or takes advantage of you or exalts himself or strikes you in the face. 21To my shame I concede that we were too weak for that! Speaking as a fool, however, I can match what anyone else dares to boast about. 22Are they Hebrews? So am I. Are they Israelites? So am I. Are they descendants of Abraham? So am I.…
Cross References
2 Corinthians 6:8
through glory and dishonor, slander and praise; viewed as imposters, yet genuine;

2 Corinthians 10:2
I beg you that when I come, I may not need to be as bold as I expect toward those who presume that we live according to the flesh.

2 Corinthians 10:10
For some say, "His letters are weighty and forceful, but his physical presence is unimpressive, and his speaking is of no account."

2 Corinthians 11:1
I hope you will bear with a little of my foolishness, but you are already doing that.

2 Corinthians 11:17
In this confident boasting of mine, I am not speaking as the Lord would, but as a fool.
Treasury of Scripture

I speak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. However, when ever any is bold, (I speak foolishly,) I am bold also.

as though.

2 Corinthians 10:1,2,10 Now I Paul myself beseech you by the meekness and gentleness of Christ, …

2 Corinthians 13:10 Therefore I write these things being absent, lest being present I …

whereinsoever.

2 Corinthians 11:22-27 Are they Hebrews? so am I. Are they Israelites? so am I. Are they …

Philippians 3:3-6 For we are the circumcision, which worship God in the spirit, and …

I speak.

2 Corinthians 11:17,23 That which I speak, I speak it not after the Lord, but as it were …

(21) I speak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak.--Better, I speak it as a matter of reproach to myself, as though we were weak. The irony becomes more intense than ever. He has named these acts of outrage, he says, as though by way of self-disparagement. "We" (the pronoun is strongly emphasised) "were too infirm to venture on such things." The taunt flung at his bodily infirmities is still present to his thoughts, and he assumes, in the bitterness of his irony, that it was through them he had been kept from like acts of self-asserting authority. Then he resumes his contrast, still dwelling on the offensive words, "folly" or "insanity," which had been used of him: "Yes, but on every ground of daring--I know you will see my insanity again in this--I have as much right to dare as they."

Verse 21. - I steak as concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. The sense is uncertain, but if with the Revised Version we render it, "I speak by way of disparagement," the verse may be understood as an ironical admission that, if absence from these violent and self-assertive proceedings be a sign of weakness, he has been weak. He proceeds to correct the ironical admission in the next clause. The meaning can hardly be, "I admit the disgraces I have suffered" (comp. 2 Corinthians 6:8), because he is speaking of the Corinthians, not of himself. I am bold also. If they derive their right to this audacious and overweening line of conduct from any privileges of theirs, there is not one of these privileges which I too may not claim. I speak as concerning reproach,.... These words may be considered either as explanative of the latter part of the former verse, "if a man smite you on the face"; that is not to be understood strictly and literally, of one man's striking another on the face, but of reproach and contumelious language, used by the false apostles to the Corinthians; or they may have reference to the apostle's design in the whole, which was partly to reproach, the Corinthians for acting such a stupid part, in patiently bearing so many and such indignities from these men; and partly to expose the scandalous and reproachful usage of them by the false apostles, that if possible their eyes might be opened to see through them, and discard them: or else these words may be regarded in connection with what follows,

as though we had been weak; and then the apostle's meaning is, that as to the business of scandal and reproach he was speaking of, this was not confined to the Corinthians only, but they the true apostles had their share of it; for the false apostles reproached them, as poor, weak, fearful, and pusillanimous men; because they did not use that authority, and exercise that domination over them, they did not bring them into bondage, devour their substance, take away their goods from them by force, insult over them, and treat them in an ignominious and contemptuous manner; and intimated that they were upon all accounts inferior to them, and not worthy to be mentioned with them; which moved the apostle to exert himself, and boldly rise up in his own defence, saying,

howbeit, wherein soever any is bold; to boast of his pedigree, character, office, and usefulness,

I speak foolishly; as it might seem, and be so interpreted by some,

I am bold also; to enter the lists with him, to compare notes, and see on which side the superiority lies; and which is done in the following verses, to the full confutation of all the pride, vanity, blind boasting of the false apostles. 21. as concerning reproach—rather, "by way of dishonor (that is, self-disparagement) I say it."

as though we … weak—in not similarly (2Co 11:20) showing our power over you. "An ironical reminiscence of his own abstinence when among them from all these acts of self-exaltation at their expense" (as if such abstinence was weakness) [Alford]. The "we" is emphatically contrasted with the false teachers who so oppressively displayed their power. I speak so as though WE had been weak when with you, because we did not show our power this way. Howbeit (we are not really weak; for), whereinsoever any is bold … I am bold also.11:16-21 It is the duty and practice of Christians to humble themselves, in obedience to the command and example of the Lord; yet prudence must direct in what it is needful to do things which we may do lawfully, even the speaking of what God has wrought for us, and in us, and by us. Doubtless here is reference to facts in which the character of the false apostles had been shown. It is astonishing to see how such men bring their followers into bondage, and how they take from them and insult them.
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Alphabetical: a about admit also am anyone as been boast bold bold-I But by comparison dare dares else fool foolishness-I for have I in is just must my myself respect say shame speak speaking that To too we weak were What whatever

NT Letters: 2 Corinthians 11:21 I speak by way of disparagement as (2 Cor. 2C iiC 2Cor ii cor iicor) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
2 Corinthians 11:20
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