John 1:41
New International Version
The first thing Andrew did was to find his brother Simon and tell him, "We have found the Messiah" (that is, the Christ).

New Living Translation
Andrew went to find his brother, Simon, and told him, “We have found the Messiah” (which means “Christ”).

English Standard Version
He first found his own brother Simon and said to him, “We have found the Messiah” (which means Christ).

Berean Study Bible
He first found his brother Simon and told him, “We have found the Messiah” (which is translated as Christ).

Berean Literal Bible
He first finds the own brother Simon and says to him, "We have found the Messiah" (which is translated Christ).

King James Bible
He first findeth his own brother Simon, and saith unto him, We have found the Messias, which is, being interpreted, the Christ.

New King James Version
He first found his own brother Simon, and said to him, “We have found the Messiah” (which is translated, the Christ).

New American Standard Bible
He first found his own brother Simon and said to him, “We have found the Messiah” (which translated means Christ).

NASB 1995
He found first his own brother Simon and said to him, "We have found the Messiah " (which translated means Christ).

NASB 1977
He found first his own brother Simon, and said to him, “We have found the Messiah” (which translated means Christ).

Amplified Bible
He first looked for and found his own brother Simon and told him, “We have found the Messiah” (which translated means the Christ).

Christian Standard Bible
He first found his own brother Simon and told him, “We have found the Messiah” (which is translated “the Christ”),

Holman Christian Standard Bible
He first found his own brother Simon and told him, "We have found the Messiah!" (which means "Anointed One"),

American Standard Version
He findeth first his own brother Simon, and saith unto him, We have found the Messiah (which is, being interpreted, Christ).

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
This one first saw Shimeon his brother and he said to him: “We have found The Messiah.”

Contemporary English Version
The first thing Andrew did was to find his brother and tell him, "We have found the Messiah!" The Hebrew word "Messiah" means the same as the Greek word "Christ."

Douay-Rheims Bible
He findeth first his brother Simon, and saith to him: We have found the Messias, which is, being interpreted, the Christ.

English Revised Version
He findeth first his own brother Simon, and saith unto him, We have found the Messiah (which is, being interpreted, Christ).

Good News Translation
At once he found his brother Simon and told him, "We have found the Messiah." (This word means "Christ.")

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Andrew at once found his brother Simon and told him, "We have found the Messiah" (which means "Christ").

International Standard Version
The first thing Andrew did was to find his brother Simon and say to him, "We have found the Anointed One!" (which is translated "Messiah").

Literal Standard Version
this one first finds his own brother Simon and says to him, “We have found the Messiah,” (which is, being interpreted, Anointed One),

NET Bible
He first found his own brother Simon and told him, "We have found the Messiah!" (which is translated Christ).

New Heart English Bible
He first found his own brother, Simon, and said to him, "We have found the Messiah." (which is translated, Christ).

Weymouth New Testament
He first found his own brother Simon, and said to him, "We have found the Messiah!" --that is to say, the Anointed One.

World English Bible
He first found his own brother, Simon, and said to him, "We have found the Messiah!" (which is, being interpreted, Christ).

Young's Literal Translation
this one doth first find his own brother Simon, and saith to him, 'We have found the Messiah,' (which is, being interpreted, The Anointed,)

Additional Translations ...
Context
The First Disciples
40Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, was one of the two who heard John’s testimony and followed Jesus. 41He first found his brother Simon and told him, “We have found the Messiah” (which is translated as Christ). 42Andrew brought him to Jesus, who looked at him and said, “You are Simon son of John. You will be called Cephas” (which is translated as Peter).…

Cross References
Psalm 2:2
The kings of the earth take their stand and the rulers gather together, against the LORD and against His Anointed One:

Daniel 9:25
Know and understand this: From the issuance of the decree to restore and rebuild Jerusalem, until the Messiah, the Prince, there will be seven weeks and sixty-two weeks. It will be rebuilt with streets and a trench, but in times of distress.

Matthew 1:23
"Behold, the virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and they will call Him Immanuel" (which means, "God with us").

John 4:25
The woman said, "I know that Messiah" (called Christ) "is coming. When He comes, He will explain everything to us."


Treasury of Scripture

He first finds his own brother Simon, and said to him, We have found the Messias, which is, being interpreted, the Christ.

first.

John 1:36,37,45
And looking upon Jesus as he walked, he saith, Behold the Lamb of God! …

John 4:28,29
The woman then left her waterpot, and went her way into the city, and saith to the men, …

2 Kings 7:9
Then they said one to another, We do not well: this day is a day of good tidings, and we hold our peace: if we tarry till the morning light, some mischief will come upon us: now therefore come, that we may go and tell the king's household.

the Messias.

John 4:25
The woman saith unto him, I know that Messias cometh, which is called Christ: when he is come, he will tell us all things.

Daniel 9:25,26
Know therefore and understand, that from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince shall be seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times…

Christ.

Psalm 2:2
The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed, saying,

Psalm 45:7
Thou lovest righteousness, and hatest wickedness: therefore God, thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.

Psalm 89:20
I have found David my servant; with my holy oil have I anointed him:









[(2) JESUS MANIFESTS HIMSELF TO INDIVIDUALS (John John 1:41 to John 2:11):

(a)To the first disciples--the witness of man (John 1:41-51);

(b)At Cana of Galilee--the witness of nature (John 1:1-11).]

(41) He first findeth his own brother.--The probable explanation of this verse, and the only one which gives an adequate meaning to "first" and "his own," is that each of the two disciples in the fulness of his fresh joy went to seek his own brother, that Andrew found Peter first, and that John records this, and by the form in which he does so implies, but does not state, that he himself found James. To have stated this would have been to break through the personal reserve which he imposed upon himself. (Comp. Matthew 4:18-21; Mark 1:16-19; Luke 5:1-10.)

We have found.--Implying a previous seeking, and that both were under the impulse of the general movement leading men to expect the Messiah. It is implied, too, that Simon was near, and therefore probably a hearer of the Baptist.

Messias.--The Hebrew form of the name occurs in the New Testament only here and in John 4:25, in both cases in a vivid picture of events fixed in the memory. Elsewhere, John, as the other sacred writers, uses the LXX. translation, "Christ," and even here he adds it (comp., e.g., in this John John 1:20; John 1:25). Both words mean "anointed" (see margin, and comp. Psalm 45:8).

Verse 41. -

(a) The Messiah. He (Andrew) first findeth his own brother Simon. Dr. Plummer here observes, "In Church history St. Peter is everything, and St. Andrew nothing: but would there have been an Apostle Peter but for Andrew?" Hengstenberg, De Wette, and others have explained the curious word "first," as though both the unnamed disciple and Andrew had gone together to search out Simon, and that Andrew had been the first of the two to be successful. This would leave the ἴδιον less satisfactorily accounted for than the simple supposition that each of the disciples started in different directions to find "his own" brother, and that Andrew was more fortunate than his companion. The two pairs of brothers are frequently mentioned as being together. James and John, Andrew and Simon, are partners on the lake of Galilee in their fishing business, and are finally called into full discipleship and apostolate after the visit to Jerusalem (see Mark 1:19, 11). The four are specially mentioned as being together (Mark 13:3), so that it is not unreasonable to suggest that when Andrew first sought "his own" brother Simon, John also sought for "his own" brother James. It is worthy of note that the evangelist never mentions his own name, nor that of James, nor that of their mother Salome, although he does imply their presence. Andrew saith to him (Simon), We have found the Messias - the article is omitted, as Ξριστός is merely the translation of" Messiah" - (which, adds the evangelist, is, being interpreted, Christ). Andrew is described on two additional occasions as bringing others to Jesus (John 6:8; John 12:22). Here the rapidity and depth of his convictions are noted. The writer's own impression is implied rather than given. He hides his own faith under the bolder and more explicit utterance of his friend. This was the result upon the mind of two disciples of the first conference with Jesus. Marvellous enough that such a thought should have possessed them, however imperfect their ideas were as yet concerning the Christ! The εὑρήκαμεν implies that they had long been waiting for the Consolation of Israel, looking for his coming, seeking his appearing. "We have sought," they say, "and we have found." A more wonderful Αὔρηκα than that of Archimedes. The plural does not necessitate the presence of John, though it does suggest the agreement of Andrew and his friend in the same august conclusion. What sense of Divine things must have come from the words and looks of Jesus! He who produced such impression on the Baptist as that which the four evangelists report, had done even more with the susceptible spirits of his two disciples. The Baptist never actually called Jesus "the Christ." But when he had testified to the pre-existing glory, the heavenly origin, the sublime functions of the great ἐρχόμενος, and by special revelation on his forewarned spirit had declared that he was the Son of God, the Lamb of God, and the Baptizer with the Holy Ghost and fire: what must not the inference be when his two disciples came into yet closer and more intimate relations with Jesus? The Jewish idea of "Messiah" (Μεσσίας, only occurring here and John 4:25), equivalent to מְשִׁיחָא, Aramaized form, the stat. emphat, of מְשִׁיחַ (Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ); cf. Ἰεσσαί for יִשַׁי (Kautzsch, 'Gram. des Bib. Aram.,' p. 10), was the term used among all classes to denote One who should, as anointed by God, fulfil the functions of Prophet, Priest and King, who should realize the splendid visions of the ancient prophecies, and combine in himself a wonderful exhibition of Divine majesty and even of awful suffering. We see that the Baptist understood what was meant by the title, but denied its applicability to himself. The Samaritans believe in a coming Prophet and Saviour (John 4:25, 29). The people believe that Messiah will work miracles, that he will be born in Bethlehem, that he will abide forever, that he would prove to be the Son of God. The King Messiah is a pre-existing power and presence in their past history. He will come in the clouds, and reign forever and ever (see John 7:26, 31 and John 7:42; John 12:34). According to Wünsche ('Neue Beitrage zurerlauterung der Ev., aus Talmud und Midrasch,' pp. 499, 500), the Talmud ('Pesachim,' 54, and 'Nedavim,' 39) declares that Messias, or his Name, was one of the seven things created before the world; and Midrasch ('Schemoth,' par. 19) on Exodus 4:22 declares that the King Messias was the Firstborn of God. The more spiritual ideas of John the Baptist have prepared the two disciples to see, even in the travel-stained, lowly Man, "the Messiah." Of course, their idea of Messiah and their idea of Jesus would suffer wonderful development, and be harmonized and blended into a sublime unity by later instructions; but they had made this great discovery, and hastened to impart it.

Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek
He
οὗτος (houtos)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 3778: This; he, she, it.

first
πρῶτον (prōton)
Adverb - Superlative
Strong's 4412: First, in the first place, before, formerly. Neuter of protos as adverb; firstly.

found
εὑρίσκει (heuriskei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 2147: A prolonged form of a primary heuro, which heureo is used for it in all the tenses except the present and imperfect to find.

[his]
τὸν (ton)
Article - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

brother
ἀδελφὸν (adelphon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

Simon
Σίμωνα (Simōna)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 4613: Simon. Of Hebrew origin; Simon, the name of nine Israelites.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

told
λέγει (legei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 3004: (a) I say, speak; I mean, mention, tell, (b) I call, name, especially in the pass., (c) I tell, command.

him,
αὐτῷ (autō)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Dative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

“We have found
Εὑρήκαμεν (Heurēkamen)
Verb - Perfect Indicative Active - 1st Person Plural
Strong's 2147: A prolonged form of a primary heuro, which heureo is used for it in all the tenses except the present and imperfect to find.

the
τὸν (ton)
Article - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Messiah”
Μεσσίαν (Messian)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 3323: Messiah, the Anointed One. Of Hebrew origin; the Messias, or Christ.

(which
(ho)
Personal / Relative Pronoun - Nominative Neuter Singular
Strong's 3739: Who, which, what, that.

is
ἐστιν (estin)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 1510: I am, exist. The first person singular present indicative; a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist.

translated as
μεθερμηνευόμενον (methermēneuomenon)
Verb - Present Participle Middle or Passive - Nominative Neuter Singular
Strong's 3177: To translate (from one language into another), interpret. From meta and hermeneuo; to explain over, i.e. Translate.

Christ).
Χριστός (Christos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 5547: Anointed One; the Messiah, the Christ. From chrio; Anointed One, i.e. The Messiah, an epithet of Jesus.


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