Job 6:3
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
It would surely outweigh the sand of the seas-- no wonder my words have been impetuous.

New Living Translation
they would outweigh all the sands of the sea. That is why I spoke impulsively.

English Standard Version
For then it would be heavier than the sand of the sea; therefore my words have been rash.

Berean Study Bible
For then it would outweigh the sand of the seas—no wonder my words have been rash.

New American Standard Bible
"For then it would be heavier than the sand of the seas; Therefore my words have been rash.

King James Bible
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea: therefore my words are swallowed up.

Christian Standard Bible
For then it would outweigh the sand of the seas! That is why my words are rash.

Contemporary English Version
They outweigh the sand along the beach, and that's why I have spoken without thinking first.

Good News Translation
they would weigh more than the sands of the sea, so my wild words should not surprise you.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
For then it would outweigh the sand of the seas! That is why my words are rash.

International Standard Version
It would weigh more than the sand on the seashore! Here's why I've talked so rashly:

NET Bible
But because it is heavier than the sand of the sea, that is why my words have been wild.

New Heart English Bible
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the seas, therefore have my words been rash.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
then they would be heavier than the sand of the seas. I spoke carelessly

JPS Tanakh 1917
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the seas; Therefore are my words broken.

New American Standard 1977
“For then it would be heavier than the sand of the seas, Therefore my words have been rash.

Jubilee Bible 2000
For it would be heavier than the sand of the sea; therefore, my words are swallowed up.

King James 2000 Bible
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea: therefore my words are swallowed up.

American King James Version
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea: therefore my words are swallowed up.

American Standard Version
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the seas: Therefore have my words been rash.

Douay-Rheims Bible
As the sand of the sea this would appear heavier: therefore my words are full of sorrow :

Darby Bible Translation
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the seas; therefore my words are vehement.

English Revised Version
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the seas: therefore have my words been rash.

Webster's Bible Translation
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea: therefore my words are swallowed up.

World English Bible
For now it would be heavier than the sand of the seas, therefore have my words been rash.

Young's Literal Translation
For now, than the sands of the sea it is heavier, Therefore my words have been rash.
Study Bible
Job Replies: My Complaint is Just
2“If only my grief could be weighed and placed with my calamity on the scales. 3For then it would outweigh the sand of the seas— no wonder my words have been rash. 4For the arrows of the Almighty have pierced me; my spirit drinks in their poison; the terrors of God are arrayed against me.…
Cross References
Job 23:2
"Even today my complaint is bitter. His hand is heavy despite my groaning.

Job 31:6
let God weigh me with honest scales, and He will know my integrity.

Treasury of Scripture

For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea: therefore my words are swallowed up.

heavier.

Proverbs 27:3 A stone is heavy, and the sand weighty; but a fool's wrath is heavier …

Matthew 11:28 Come to me, all you that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

my words are swallowed up. that is, I want words to express my grief.

Job 37:19,20 Teach us what we shall say to him; for we cannot order our speech …

Psalm 40:5 Many, O LORD my God, are your wonderful works which you have done, …

Psalm 77:4 You hold my eyes waking: I am so troubled that I cannot speak.







(3) Swallowed up.--That is. words are useless and powerless to express it. (See the margin.)

Verse 3. - For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea (comp. Proverbs 27:3, "A stone is heavy, and the sand weighty; but a fool's wrath is heavier than them both;" see also Ecclus. 22:15). Therefore my words are swallowed up; rather, as in the Revised Version, therefore have my words been rash. Job here excuses without justifying himself. The excessive character of his sufferings has, he declares, forced him to utter rash and violent words, as these wherein he cursed his day and wished that he had never been born (Job 3:1, 3-11). Some allowance ought to be made for rash speech uttered under such circumstances. For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea,.... Or "seas" (z); all sand is heavy in its own nature, Proverbs 27:3; especially the sand of the sea, that which is immediately taken out of it; for that on the shore is lighter, being dried by the winds and heat of the sun, but the other is heavier, through the additional weight of water; and much more especially how heavy must all the sand of the sea be, and of all the seas that are in the world: yet Job suggests by this hyperbolical expression, exaggerating his case, that his affliction was heavier than it all, a most intolerable and insupportable burden; the afflictions of God's people are but light when compared with what their sins deserve, with the torments of the damned in hell, with the sufferings of Christ in their room and stead, and with everlasting, happiness, the eternal weight of glory, 2 Corinthians 4:17; but in themselves they are heavy, and press hard; they are so to flesh and blood, and especially unless everlasting arms are put under men, and they are supported and upheld with the right hand of God's righteousness; they are heavy when attended with the hidings of God's face, and a sense of his wrath and displeasure, which was Job's case, see Job 13:24; some render "it more copious", or "numerous" (a), and indeed the word has this signification, as in Numbers 20:20; and the metaphor is more frequently used to express a multitude, even what is innumerable, Hosea 1:10; yet the notion of heaviness best agrees with the preceding figure of weighing in balances, and therefore at least is not to be excluded some learned men take in both, as the sense of the word, the number of afflictions, and the bulk and weight of them:

therefore my words are swallowed up; either by his friends, as Kimchi, who heard them, and put a wrong construction on them, without thoroughly examining the true sense of them; as men that swallow down their food greedily, do not chew it, nor take the true taste of it, and so are no judges whether it is good or bad; but this sense seems to have no connection with what goes before; rather they were swallowed up by himself, and the meaning either is, that such was the weight and pressure of his afflictions, that he wanted words to express it; his words "failed" him, as the Targum: or they "come short", as Mr. Broughton renders it; they were not sufficient to set forth and declare the greatness of his troubles; or he faltered in his speech, he could not speak out plainly and distinctly, because of his grief and sorrow, see Psalm 77:4; what he had said was delivered amidst sighs and sobs, through the heaviness of the calamity on him; they were but half words, attended with groanings that could not be uttered; by which he would signify, that though his friends had charged him with speaking too much and too freely, he had not spoken enough, nor could he, by reason of the greatness of his affliction; and also to excuse his present answer, if it was not delivered with that politeness and fulness of expression, with that eloquence and strength of reasoning and discoursing he at other times was capable of: or rather the words may be rendered, "therefore my words break out with heat" (b); in a vehement manner, in a hot and passionate way I am blamed for; but this is to be imputed to the burden of affliction and sorrow upon me, which, if considered, some allowances would be made, and the charge be alleviated.

(z) "marium", Pagninus, Montanus, Mercerus, Piscator, Michaelis, Schultens. (a) "copiosior et gravior est", Michaelis; so Schultens. (b) "propterea verba mea aestuantia sunt", Schultens. 3. the sand—(Pr 27:3).

are swallowed up—See Margin [that is, "I want words to express my grief"]. But Job plainly is apologizing, not for not having had words enough, but for having spoken too much and too boldly; and the Hebrew is, "to speak rashly" [Umbreit, Gesenius, Rosenmuller]. "Therefore were my words so rash."6:1-7 Job still justifies himself in his complaints. In addition to outward troubles, the inward sense of God's wrath took away all his courage and resolution. The feeling sense of the wrath of God is harder to bear than any outward afflictions. What then did the Saviour endure in the garden and on the cross, when he bare our sins, and his soul was made a sacrifice to Divine justice for us! Whatever burden of affliction, in body or estate, God is pleased to lay upon us, we may well submit to it as long as he continues to us the use of our reason, and the peace of our conscience; but if either of these is disturbed, our case is very pitiable. Job reflects upon his friends for their censures. He complains he had nothing offered for his relief, but what was in itself tasteless, loathsome, and burdensome.
Jump to Previous
Broken Heavier Impetuous Outweigh Rash Sand Sands Sea Seas Surely Swallowed Uncontrolled Vehement Weight Wonder Words
Jump to Next
Broken Heavier Impetuous Outweigh Rash Sand Sands Sea Seas Surely Swallowed Uncontrolled Vehement Weight Wonder Words
Links
Job 6:3 NIV
Job 6:3 NLT
Job 6:3 ESV
Job 6:3 NASB
Job 6:3 KJV

Job 6:3 Bible Apps
Job 6:3 Biblia Paralela
Job 6:3 Chinese Bible
Job 6:3 French Bible
Job 6:3 German Bible

Alphabetical: be been For have heavier impetuous It my no of outweigh rash sand seas surely than the then Therefore wonder words would

OT Poetry: Job 6:3 For now it would be heavier than (Jb) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Job 6:2
Top of Page
Top of Page