Job 6:1
New International Version
Then Job replied:

New Living Translation
Then Job spoke again:

English Standard Version
Then Job answered and said:

Berean Study Bible
Then Job replied:

New American Standard Bible
Then Job answered,

King James Bible
But Job answered and said,

Christian Standard Bible
Then Job answered:

Contemporary English Version
Job said:

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then Job answered:

International Standard Version
In rebuttal, Job replied:

NET Bible
Then Job responded:

New Heart English Bible
Then Job answered,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Then Job replied [to his friends],

JPS Tanakh 1917
Then Job answered and said:

New American Standard 1977
Then Job answered,

Jubilee Bible 2000
And Job answered and said,

King James 2000 Bible
But Job answered and said,

American King James Version
But Job answered and said,

American Standard Version
Then Job answered and said,

Brenton Septuagint Translation
But Job answered and said,

Douay-Rheims Bible
But Job answered, and said:

Darby Bible Translation
And Job answered and said,

English Revised Version
Then Job answered and said,

Webster's Bible Translation
But Job answered and said,

World English Bible
Then Job answered,

Young's Literal Translation
And Job answereth and saith: --
Study Bible
Job Replies: My Complaint is Just
1Then Job replied: 2“If only my grief could be weighed and placed with my calamity on the scales.…
Cross References
Job 5:27
Indeed, we have investigated, and it is true! So hear it and know for yourself."

Job 6:2
"If only my grief could be weighed and placed with my calamity on the scales.

Treasury of Scripture

But Job answered and said,

answered.

Job 4:1
Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said,







Lexicon
Then Job
אִיּ֗וֹב (’î·yō·wḇ)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 347: Job -- a patriarch

replied:
וַיַּ֥עַן (way·ya·‘an)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 6030: To answer, respond
VI.

(1) But Job answered and said.--Job replies to Eliphaz with the despair of a man who has been baulked of sympathy when he hoped to find it. We cannot trace, nor must we expect to find, the formal reply of a logical argument, fliphaz, he feels, has so misjudged his case that he is neither worthy of a direct reply nor susceptible of one. It is enough for him to reiterate his complaint, and long for one who can enter into it.

Verses 1, 2. - But Job answered and said, Oh that my grief were throughly weighed! rather, my anger, or my vexation - the same word as that used by Eliphaz when reproaching Job, in Job 5:2. Job wishes that, before men blame him, they would calmly weigh the force of his feelings and expressions against the weight of the calamity which oppresses him. His words may seem too strong and too violent; but are they more than a just counterpoise to the extreme character of his afflictions? The weighing of words and thoughts was an essential element in the Egyptian conception of the judgment, where Thoth held the balance, and in the one scale were placed the merits of the deceased, in the other the image of Ma, or Truth, and his fate was determined by the side to which the balance inclined ('Ritual of the Dead,' ch. 125; Wilkinson, 'Ancient Egyptians,' vol. 5. p. 252). And my calamity laid in the balances together. My calamity placed in one scale, and my vexation in the other, and so weighed, each against each. 6:1-7 Job still justifies himself in his complaints. In addition to outward troubles, the inward sense of God's wrath took away all his courage and resolution. The feeling sense of the wrath of God is harder to bear than any outward afflictions. What then did the Saviour endure in the garden and on the cross, when he bare our sins, and his soul was made a sacrifice to Divine justice for us! Whatever burden of affliction, in body or estate, God is pleased to lay upon us, we may well submit to it as long as he continues to us the use of our reason, and the peace of our conscience; but if either of these is disturbed, our case is very pitiable. Job reflects upon his friends for their censures. He complains he had nothing offered for his relief, but what was in itself tasteless, loathsome, and burdensome.
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Job 5:27
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