2 Corinthians 2:4
New International Version
For I wrote you out of great distress and anguish of heart and with many tears, not to grieve you but to let you know the depth of my love for you.

New Living Translation
I wrote that letter in great anguish, with a troubled heart and many tears. I didn’t want to grieve you, but I wanted to let you know how much love I have for you.

English Standard Version
For I wrote to you out of much affliction and anguish of heart and with many tears, not to cause you pain but to let you know the abundant love that I have for you.

Berean Study Bible
For through many tears I wrote you out of great distress and anguish of heart, not to grieve you but to let you know how much I love you.

Berean Literal Bible
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart, I wrote to you through many tears, not that you might be grieved, but that you might know the love that I have more abundantly toward you.

New American Standard Bible
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears; not so that you would be made sorrowful, but that you might know the love which I have especially for you.

King James Bible
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote unto you with many tears; not that ye should be grieved, but that ye might know the love which I have more abundantly unto you.

Christian Standard Bible
For I wrote to you with many tears out of an extremely troubled and anguished heart--not to cause you pain, but that you should know the abundant love I have for you.

Contemporary English Version
At the time I wrote, I was suffering terribly. My eyes were full of tears, and my heart was broken. But I didn't want to make you feel bad. I only wanted to let you know how much I cared for you.

Good News Translation
I wrote you with a greatly troubled and distressed heart and with many tears; my purpose was not to make you sad, but to make you realize how much I love you all.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
For I wrote to you with many tears out of an extremely troubled and anguished heart--not that you should be hurt, but that you should know the abundant love I have for you.

International Standard Version
I wrote to you out of great sorrow and anguish of heart—along with many tears—not to make you sad but to let you know how much love I have for you.

NET Bible
For out of great distress and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears, not to make you sad, but to let you know the love that I have especially for you.

New Heart English Bible
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears, not that you should be made sorry, but that you might know the love that I have so abundantly for you.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And I wrote to you these things in many tears from great suffering and anguish of heart, not so that you would grieve, but so that you would know the abundant love that I have for you.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
I was deeply troubled and anguished. In fact, I had tears in my eyes when I wrote to you. I didn't write to make you uncomfortable but to let you know how much I love you.

New American Standard 1977
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears; not that you should be made sorrowful, but that you might know the love which I have especially for you.

Jubilee Bible 2000
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote unto you with many tears; not that ye should be grieved, but that ye might know how much more charity I have towards you.

King James 2000 Bible
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote unto you with many tears; not that you should be grieved, but that you might know the love which I have more abundantly unto you.

American King James Version
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears; not that you should be grieved, but that you might know the love which I have more abundantly to you.

American Standard Version
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote unto you with many tears; not that ye should be made sorry, but that ye might know the love that I have more abundantly unto you.

Douay-Rheims Bible
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart, I wrote to you with many tears: not that you should be made sorrowful: but that you might know the charity I have more abundantly towards you.

Darby Bible Translation
For out of much tribulation and distress of heart I wrote to you, with many tears; not that ye may be grieved, but that ye may know the love which I have very abundantly towards you.

English Revised Version
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote unto you with many tears; not that ye should be made sorry, but that ye might know the love which I have more abundantly unto you.

Webster's Bible Translation
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears; not that ye should be grieved, but that ye might know the love which I have more abundantly to you.

Weymouth New Testament
For with many tears I write to you, and in deep suffering and depression of spirit, not in order to grieve you, but in the hope of showing you how brimful my heart is with love for you.

World English Bible
For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears, not that you should be made sorry, but that you might know the love that I have so abundantly for you.

Young's Literal Translation
for out of much tribulation and pressure of heart I wrote to you through many tears, not that ye might be made sorry, but that ye might know the love that I have more abundantly toward you.
Study Bible
Reaffirm Your Love
3I wrote as I did so that on my arrival I would not be saddened by those who ought to make me rejoice. I had confidence in all of you, that you would share my joy. 4For through many tears I wrote you out of great distress and anguish of heart, not to grieve you but to let you know how much I love you. 5Now if anyone has caused grief, he has not grieved me but all of you—to some degree, not to overstate it.…
Cross References
2 Corinthians 2:9
My purpose in writing you was to see if you would stand the test and be obedient in everything.

2 Corinthians 7:8
Even if I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it. Although I did regret it, I now see that my letter caused you sorrow, but only for a short time.

2 Corinthians 7:12
So even though I wrote to you, it was not on account of the one who did wrong or the one who was harmed, but rather that your earnestness on our behalf would be made clear to you in the sight of God.

Treasury of Scripture

For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote to you with many tears; not that you should be grieved, but that you might know the love which I have more abundantly to you.

out.

Leviticus 19:17,18
Thou shalt not hate thy brother in thine heart: thou shalt in any wise rebuke thy neighbour, and not suffer sin upon him…

Psalm 119:136
Rivers of waters run down mine eyes, because they keep not thy law.

Proverbs 27:5,6
Open rebuke is better than secret love…

not.

2 Corinthians 7:8,9,12
For though I made you sorry with a letter, I do not repent, though I did repent: for I perceive that the same epistle hath made you sorry, though it were but for a season…

2 Corinthians 12:15
And I will very gladly spend and be spent for you; though the more abundantly I love you, the less I be loved.

that you might.

2 Corinthians 11:2
For I am jealous over you with godly jealousy: for I have espoused you to one husband, that I may present you as a chaste virgin to Christ.







Lexicon
For
γὰρ (gar)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1063: For. A primary particle; properly, assigning a reason.

through
διὰ (dia)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

many
πολλῶν (pollōn)
Adjective - Genitive Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 4183: Much, many; often.

tears
δακρύων (dakryōn)
Noun - Genitive Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 1144: A tear. Or dakruon dak'-roo-on; of uncertain affinity; a tear.

I wrote
ἔγραψα (egrapsa)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1125: A primary verb; to 'grave', especially to write; figuratively, to describe.

you
ὑμῖν (hymin)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Dative 2nd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

out of
ἐκ (ek)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1537: From out, out from among, from, suggesting from the interior outwards. A primary preposition denoting origin, from, out.

great
πολλῆς (pollēs)
Adjective - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 4183: Much, many; often.

distress
θλίψεως (thlipseōs)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2347: Persecution, affliction, distress, tribulation. From thlibo; pressure.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

anguish
συνοχῆς (synochēs)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 4928: Distress, anguish, anxiety. From sunecho; restraint, i.e. anxiety.

of heart,
καρδίας (kardias)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2588: Prolonged from a primary kar; the heart, i.e. the thoughts or feelings; also the middle.

not
οὐχ (ouch)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3756: No, not. Also ouk, and ouch a primary word; the absolute negative adverb; no or not.

to
ἵνα (hina)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2443: In order that, so that. Probably from the same as the former part of heautou; in order that.

grieve you
λυπηθῆτε (lypēthēte)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Passive - 2nd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 3076: To pain, grieve, vex. From lupe; to distress; reflexively or passively, to be sad.

but
ἀλλὰ (alla)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 235: But, except, however. Neuter plural of allos; properly, other things, i.e. contrariwise.

to
ἵνα (hina)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2443: In order that, so that. Probably from the same as the former part of heautou; in order that.

let you know
γνῶτε (gnōte)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Active - 2nd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 1097: A prolonged form of a primary verb; to 'know' in a great variety of applications and with many implications.

how much
περισσοτέρως (perissoterōs)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 4057: Greatly, exceedingly, abundantly, vehemently. Adverb from perissos; superabundantly.

I love you.
ἀγάπην (agapēn)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 26: From agapao; love, i.e. Affection or benevolence; specially a love-feast.
(4) Out of much affliction and anguish.--Men might think that it had cost him little to write sharp words like those which he has in his mind. He remembers well what he felt as he dictated them--the intensity of his feelings, pain that such words should be needed, anxiety as to their issue, the very tears which then, as at other times (Acts 20:19; Acts 20:31; 2Timothy 1:4), were the outflow of strong emotion. Those who were indignant at his stern words should remember, or at least learn to believe this, and so to see in them the strongest proof of his abounding love for them. The heart of St. Paul was in this matter as the heart of Him who said, "As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten" (Revelation 3:19). The motive in such a case is not to give pain, but to lead those whom we reprove to feel how much we love them. On the word for "anguish," see Note on Luke 21:25. Looking to the fact that it is used only by St. Luke and St. Paul in the New Testament, we may, perhaps, see in it another example of medical terminology. The anguish was like that of a tight pressure or constriction of the heart.

Verse 4. - For. He proceeds to assign the anguish which his First Epistle had caused him as a proof of his confidence that, as a body, they loved him as he loved them. If they had regarded each other with indifference, his letter would not have been written to them, as it were. in his heart's blood. Out of much affliction and anguish of heart. The word for "anguish" means "contraction," "pressure," "spasm" (Luke 21:25). The expression may seem far too strong to be accounted for by the tone of the first letter. Hence some have supposed that he is referring to some other letter now last; and others that ch. 10-13. of this letter, where the whole tone of affection and tenderness suddenly changes into one of impassioned irony and indignation, really belonged to this intermediate letter. There is no need, however, for these hypotheses. In 1 Corinthians 5:1-6:11 he had spoken of the errors of the Church with strong reprobation, and the anguish with which he wrote the letter may have been all the more deeply felt because, in expressing it, he put on his feelings a strong restraint. With many tears. I wrote "out of" anguish, and that anguish showed itself through the tears which bathed my cheeks as I wrote. Such tears, says Calvin, "show weakness, but a weakness more heroic than would have been the iron apathy of a Stoic." It must, however, be remembered that, in ancient times, and in Southern and Eastern lands, men yielded to tears more readily than among Northern nations, who take pride in suppressing as far as possible all outward signs of emotion. In Homer the bravest heroes do not blush to weep in public, and the nervous, afflicted temperament of St. Paul seems to have been often overwhelmed with weeping (Acts 20:19, 31; 2 Timothy 1:4). Not that ye should be grieved. The "not," by a common Hebrew idiom, means "not only," "not exclusively." His object in inflicting pain was not the pain itself, but the results of godly repentance which it produced (2 Corinthians 7:11). The love. In the Greek this word is placed very emphatically at the beginning of the clause. More abundantly. I loved you more than I loved other converts, and the abundance of my love will give you a measure of the pain I felt. The Philippians were St. Paul's best-beloved converts; but next to them he seems to have felt more personal tenderness for the members of this inflated, wayward, erring Church than for any other community, just as a father sometimes loves best his least-deserving son. There was something in the brightness and keenness of the Greek nature which won over St. Paul, in spite of its many faults. 2:1-4 The apostle desired to have a cheerful meeting with them; and he had written in confidence of their doing what was to their benefit and his comfort; and that therefore they would be glad to remove every cause of disquiet from him. We should always give pain unwillingly, even when duty requires that it must be given.
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Alphabetical: affliction and anguish be but depth distress especially For great grieve have heart I know let love made many might much my not of out so sorrowful tears that the to which with would wrote you

NT Letters: 2 Corinthians 2:4 For out of much affliction and anguish (2 Cor. 2C iiC 2Cor ii cor iicor) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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