Matthew 6:10
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

New Living Translation
May your Kingdom come soon. May your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.

English Standard Version
Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Berean Study Bible
Your kingdom come, Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Berean Literal Bible
Your kingdom come. Your will be done as in heaven, so also upon earth.

New American Standard Bible
'Your kingdom come. Your will be done, On earth as it is in heaven.

King James Bible
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

International Standard Version
May your kingdom come. May your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

NET Bible
may your kingdom come, may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

New Heart English Bible
Let your Kingdom come. Let your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Let your Kingdom come, let your will be done also in the earth, just as it is in Heaven.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Let your kingdom come. Let your will be done on earth as it is done in heaven.

New American Standard 1977
‘Thy kingdom come.
            Thy will be done,
            On earth as it is in heaven.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

King James 2000 Bible
Your kingdom come. Your will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

American King James Version
Your kingdom come, Your will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

American Standard Version
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so on earth.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Darby Bible Translation
let thy kingdom come, let thy will be done as in heaven so upon the earth;

English Revised Version
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so on earth.

Webster's Bible Translation
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Weymouth New Testament
let Thy kingdom come; let Thy will be done, as in Heaven so on earth;

World English Bible
Let your Kingdom come. Let your will be done, as in heaven, so on earth.

Young's Literal Translation
'Thy reign come: Thy will come to pass, as in heaven also on the earth.
Study Bible
The Lord's Prayer
9So then, this is how you should pray: ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be Your name, 10Your kingdom come, Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. 11Give us this day our daily bread,…
Cross References
Psalm 103:20
Bless the LORD, you His angels, Mighty in strength, who perform His word, Obeying the voice of His word!

Matthew 3:2
and saying, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near."

Matthew 4:17
From that time on Jesus began to preach, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near."

Matthew 26:42
A second time He went away and prayed, "My Father, if this cup cannot pass unless I drink it, may Your will be done."

Luke 22:42
"Father, if You are willing, take this cup from Me. Yet not My will, but Yours be done."

Acts 21:14
When he would not be dissuaded, we fell silent and said, "The Lord's will be done."
Treasury of Scripture

Your kingdom come, Your will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Thy kingdom.

Matthew 3:2 And saying, Repent you: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.

Matthew 4:17 From that time Jesus began to preach, and to say, Repent: for the …

Matthew 16:28 Truly I say to you, There be some standing here, which shall not …

Psalm 2:6 Yet have I set my king on my holy hill of Zion.

Isaiah 2:2 And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of …

Jeremiah 23:5 Behold, the days come, said the LORD, that I will raise to David …

Daniel 2:44 And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, …

Daniel 7:13,27 I saw in the night visions, and, behold, one like the Son of man …

Zechariah 9:9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: …

Mark 11:10 Blessed be the kingdom of our father David, that comes in the name …

Luke 19:11,38 And as they heard these things, he added and spoke a parable, because …

Colossians 1:13 Who has delivered us from the power of darkness, and has translated …

Revelation 11:15 And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying…

Revelation 12:10 And I heard a loud voice saying in heaven, Now is come salvation, …

Revelation 19:6 And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the …

Revelation 20:4 And I saw thrones, and they sat on them, and judgment was given to them…

Thy will.

Matthew 7:21 Not every one that said to me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom …

Matthew 12:50 For whoever shall do the will of my Father which is in heaven, the …

Matthew 26:42 He went away again the second time, and prayed, saying, O my Father, …

Psalm 40:8 I delight to do your will, O my God: yes, your law is within my heart.

Mark 3:35 For whoever shall do the will of God, the same is my brother, and …

John 4:34 Jesus said to them, My meat is to do the will of him that sent me, …

John 6:40 And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which sees …

John 7:17 If any man will do his will, he shall know of the doctrine, whether …

Acts 13:22 And when he had removed him, he raised up to them David to be their …

Acts 21:14 And when he would not be persuaded, we ceased, saying, The will of …

Acts 22:14 And he said, The God of our fathers has chosen you, that you should …

Romans 12:2 And be not conformed to this world: but be you transformed by the …

Ephesians 6:6 Not with eye-service, as men pleasers; but as the servants of Christ, …

Colossians 1:9 For this cause we also, since the day we heard it, do not cease …

1 Thessalonians 4:3 For this is the will of God, even your sanctification, that you should …

1 Thessalonians 5:18 In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ …

Hebrews 10:7,36 Then said I, See, I come (in the volume of the book it is written …

Hebrews 13:21 Make you perfect in every good work to do his will, working in you …

1 Peter 2:15 For so is the will of God, that with well doing you may put to silence …

1 Peter 4:2 That he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh to …

as.

Nehemiah 9:6 You, even you, are LORD alone; you have made heaven, the heaven of …

Psalm 103:19-21 The LORD has prepared his throne in the heavens; and his kingdom …

Daniel 4:35 And all the inhabitants of the earth are reputed as nothing: and …

Hebrews 1:14 Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for …

(10) Thy kingdom come.--Historically, the prayer had its origin in the Messianic expectations embodied in the picture of the ideal king in Isaiah 11:1-6; Isaiah 42:1-7, Daniel 7:14. It had long been familiar to all who looked for the consolation of Israel. Now the kingdom of God, that in which He manifests His sovereignty more than in the material world or in the common course of history, had been proclaimed as nigh at hand. The Teacher of the prayer knew Himself to be the Head of that kingdom. But it was not, like the kingdoms of the world, one that rested on the despotism of might, but on the acknowledgment of righteousness. It was therefore ever growing to a completeness, which it has never yet reached. Its advance to that completeness might be retarded by man's self-will, and hastened by man's fulfilment of its conditions. And therefore we pray that it may "come" in its fulness, that all created beings may bring their wills into harmony with God's will. So tar as that prayer comes from the heart and not from the lips only, it is in part self-fulfilling, in part it works according to the law by which God answers prayers that are in harmony with His own will; and in so far as the kingdom, though in one sense it has come, and is in the midst of us, and within us, is yet far from the goal towards which it moves, ever coming and yet to come, the prayer is one that never becomes obsolete, and may be the utterance of the saints in glory no less than of toilers and sufferers upon earth.

Thy will be done.--The prayer has often been, even in the lips of Christians, hardly more than the "acceptance of the inevitable." Like the Stoic, we have submitted to a destiny; like the Moslem, we have been resigned to a decree. But as it came from the lips of the Son of Man, it was surely far more than this. We pray that the will of God may be done because we believe it to be perfectly loving and righteous. It is the will that desires our sanctification (1Thessalonians 4:3), that does not will that any should perish. The real difficulty in the prayer is, that it lands us, as before. in a mystery which we cannot solve. It assumes that even the will of God is in part dependent on our wills, that it will not be done unless we so pray. The question, "Who hath resisted this will? Does it not ever fulfil itself?" forces itself on our thoughts. And the answer is found, as before, in accepting the seeming paradox of prayer. In one sense the will of God, which is also the eternal law, must fulfil itself; but it is one thing for that law to work in subduing all things to itself, another for it to bring all created wills into harmony with itself. And in really praying for this we, as before, in part fulfil the prayer.

As it is in heaven.--The thought is true of the order of the visible heaven, where law reigns supreme, with no "variableness or shadow of turning." But seeing that the obedience contemplated is that of the will, it is better, perhaps, to think of the words as pointing to the unseen hosts of heaven, the ministering angels, and the spirits of just men made perfect. That all wills on earth should be brought into the same entire conformity with the divine will as theirs, is what we are taught to pray for.

Verse 10. - Thy kingdom come. Let there come the full establishment of thy realm. The prayer passes from the personal acceptance in the heart of God's revelation of himself to the consequent result. The clause has a much wider meaning than the development and spread of the Church, or even the personal return of Christ at the second advent. It speaks of that which shall be the issue of both this and that, the final and perfect establishment of God's realm, in which all men will do him willing service, and all habits and customs, individual and social, will be such as he approves of (vide Introduction, p. 25.). Dr. C. Taylor ('Sayings,' etc., Exc. 5.) points out that the coming of the kingdom and the sanctifying of the Name are brought together in Zechariah 14:9; Weiss, ' Life,' 2:349, with many others, says that our Lord probably adapted the frequent Jewish prayer for the coming of the kingdom of Messiah. Thy will be done. Let thy will come into complete existence (γενηθήτω; cf. "Let there be light," Genesis 1:3, LXX.). The thought is not merely God's will realized in this or that action, whether performed or endured by us (cf. Matthew 26:42; Acts 21:14), but God's will as a whole coming into full being. God's will is always in ideal until it is accomplished in act. The connexion of the clause with what has gone before is therefore this - the acceptance of God's manifestation of himself leads to the establishment of his realm, and this to the realization of his will, which until then is only ideal (cf. Matthew 5:18, note, end). If this be all the meaning of the words, they express, in fact, only the ultimate result of the consummation prayed for in the preceding clause (hence this portion of the prayer was in itself complete without our present words; cf. Luke 11:2); but since it is so far a distinct thought that it would not immediately suggest itself, it has a worthy place in the fuller form of the prayer. Possibly, however, more may be intended. The full establishment of the kingdom may be only a part of his loving will, which may, for all we know, have countless other things in view. The highest prayer that we can make in the furtherance of God's cause is that his gracious purpose, his will (whatever it may include) may be fully brought about. In earth, as it is in heaven; as in heaven, so on earth (Revised Version). Probably the words are to be joined to only the immediately preceding clause. In heaven God's will is already realized; not yet on earth, where sin has entered. Thy kingdom come,.... The form of expression used by the ancient Jews, relating to this article, before the coming of Christ, doubtless was, as it now stands in their prayers (r), , "the kingdom of thy Messiah come". Christ alters the expression, leaves out the word "Messiah", and puts it thus, "thy kingdom come", to let them know that the Messiah was come; and that it was the kingdom of the Father, in the power of his grace, upon the souls of men, they must pray for and expect: however, he conformed to a rule of their's in this, as well as in the former petition (s); that

"every blessing, or prayer, in which there is no , "mention made of the name", i.e. of God, is no prayer; and that every prayer, in which there is not "the kingdom", is no prayer.''

In this petition the disciples were taught to pray for the success of the Gospel, both among Jews and Gentiles; for the conversion of God's elect, in which the kingdom of God would greatly appear, to the destruction of the kingdom of Satan, and the abolition of the kingdom of the beast, in the latter day; which will usher in the kingdom, of the mediator, he will receive from his Father, and this will terminate in the kingdom of glory: in a word, not the kingdom of nature and providence is meant, which always was; but the kingdom of heaven, which was at hand, nay had taken place, though as yet was not very visible, and which is spiritual in the hearts of God's people, Jews and Gentiles; and which will appear exceeding glorious in the latter day, and at last be swallowed up in the ultimate glory; all which must be very desirable by the sincere lovers of Jesus Christ.

Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. There is some appearance of this petition still remaining, in what the (t) Jews call the short prayer:

"what is the short prayer? R. Eliezer says, , "do thy will in heaven"; and give quietness of spirit, or acquiescence of spirit in thy will, to them that fear thee below.''

Christ says "thy will"; not the will of wicked men, nor the will of Satan, nor a man's own will, but the will of God: by which is meant either his secret will, which is the rule of all his proceedings both in providence and grace; is unknown to us, till facts make it appear; is always fulfilled in heaven and in earth; and sometimes is fulfilled by those who have no regard to his revealed will; and is what ought to be submitted to patiently, and without murmuring: or rather his revealed will, which consists partly in the declarations of his grace and mercy; as that salvation is by Christ, whoever believes in him shall be saved, that all the redeemed be sanctified, persevere to the end, and be glorified; and partly in the commands enjoined his people, which will of his is good, perfect, and acceptable. The will of God may be said to be done by us, when our wills are resigned to his; when we patiently submit to every adverse dispensation of providence; when our hearts and actions are, in some measure, conformed to his law; when what is done, is done in faith, with a view to his glory, and without dependence upon it; of which such only are capable who have a spiritual understanding of the will of God, believe in Christ, receive grace and strength from him, and are assisted by his Spirit. These desire to do the will of God, as it is done in heaven; meaning not so much by the inanimate creatures, the sun, and moon, and stars, as glorified saints and holy angels, who do it voluntarily and cheerfully; speedily, and without delay; constantly, and without any interruption; and perfectly and completely.

(r) Seder Tephillot, fol. 128. 2. Ed. Basil. (s) T. Bab. Beracot, fol. 40. 2.((t) Ib. fol. 29. 2.10. Thy kingdom come—The kingdom of God is that moral and spiritual kingdom which the God of grace is setting up in this fallen world, whose subjects consist of as many as have been brought into hearty subjection to His gracious scepter, and of which His Son Jesus is the glorious Head. In the inward reality of it, this kingdom existed ever since there were men who "walked with God" (Ge 5:24), and "waited for His salvation" (Ge 49:18); who were "continually with Him, holden by His right hand" (Ps 73:23), and who, even in the valley of the shadow of death, feared no evil when He was with them (Ps 23:4). When Messiah Himself appeared, it was, as a visible kingdom, "at hand." His death laid the deep foundations of it. His ascension on high, "leading captivity captive and receiving gifts for men, yea, for the rebellious, that the Lord God might dwell among them," and the Pentecostal effusion of the Spirit, by which those gifts for men descended upon the rebellious, and the Lord God was beheld, in the persons of thousands upon thousands, "dwelling" among men—was a glorious "coming" of this kingdom. But it is still to come, and this petition, "Thy kingdom come," must not cease to ascend so long as one subject of it remains to be brought in. But does not this prayer stretch further forward—to "the glory to be revealed," or that stage of the kingdom called "the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ" (2Pe 1:11)? Not directly, perhaps, since the petition that follows this—"Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven"—would then bring us back to this present state of imperfection. Still, the mind refuses to be so bounded by stages and degrees, and in the act of praying, "Thy kingdom come," it irresistibly stretches the wings of its faith, and longing, and joyous expectation out to the final and glorious consummation of the kingdom of God.

Third Petition:

Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven—or, as the same words are rendered in Luke, "as in heaven, so upon earth" (Lu 11:2)—as cheerfully, as constantly, as perfectly. But some will ask, Will this ever be? We answer, If the "new heavens and new earth" are to be just our present material system purified by fire and transfigured, of course it will. But we incline to think that the aspiration which we are taught in this beautiful petition to breathe forth has no direct reference to any such organic fulfilment, and is only the spontaneous and resistless longing of the renewed soul—put into words—to see the whole inhabited earth in entire conformity to the will of God. It asks not if ever it shall be—or if ever it can be—in order to pray this prayer. It must have its holy yearnings breathed forth, and this is just the bold yet simple expression of them. Nor is the Old Testament without prayers which come very near to this (Ps 7:9; 67:1-7; 72:19, etc.).

Fourth Petition:6:9-15 Christ saw it needful to show his disciples what must commonly be the matter and method of their prayer. Not that we are tied up to the use of this only, or of this always; yet, without doubt, it is very good to use it. It has much in a little; and it is used acceptably no further than it is used with understanding, and without being needlessly repeated. The petitions are six; the first three relate more expressly to God and his honour, the last three to our own concerns, both temporal and spiritual. This prayer teaches us to seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and that all other things shall be added. After the things of God's glory, kingdom, and will, we pray for the needful supports and comforts of this present life. Every word here has a lesson in it. We ask for bread; that teaches us sobriety and temperance: and we ask only for bread; not for what we do not need. We ask for our bread; that teaches us honesty and industry: we do not ask for the bread of others, nor the bread of deceit, Pr 20:17; nor the bread of idleness, Pr 31:27, but the bread honestly gotten. We ask for our daily bread; which teaches us constantly to depend upon Divine Providence. We beg of God to give it us; not sell it us, nor lend it us, but give it. The greatest of men must be beholden to the mercy of God for their daily bread. We pray, Give it to us. This teaches us a compassion for the poor. Also that we ought to pray with our families. We pray that God would give it us this day; which teaches us to renew the desires of our souls toward God, as the wants of our bodies are renewed. As the day comes we must pray to our heavenly Father, and reckon we could as well go a day without food, as without prayer. We are taught to hate and dread sin while we hope for mercy, to distrust ourselves, to rely on the providence and grace of God to keep us from it, to be prepared to resist the tempter, and not to become tempters of others. Here is a promise, If you forgive, your heavenly Father will also forgive. We must forgive, as we hope to be forgiven. Those who desire to find mercy with God, must show mercy to their brethren. Christ came into the world as the great Peace-maker, not only to reconcile us to God, but one to another.
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