Luke 22:19
Parallel Verses
New International Version
And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me."

New Living Translation
He took some bread and gave thanks to God for it. Then he broke it in pieces and gave it to the disciples, saying, "This is my body, which is given for you. Do this to remember me."

English Standard Version
And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”

New American Standard Bible
And when He had taken some bread and given thanks, He broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me."

King James Bible
And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
And He took bread, gave thanks, broke it, gave it to them, and said, "This is My body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of Me."

International Standard Version
Then he took a loaf of bread, gave thanks, broke it in pieces, and handed it to them, saying, "This is my body, which is given for you. Keep on doing this in memory of me."

NET Bible
Then he took bread, and after giving thanks he broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me."

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
He took bread and he gave thanks, he broke and he gave to them and he said, “This is my body, which shall be given for the sake of your persons. You shall be doing this to commemorate me.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Then Jesus took bread and spoke a prayer of thanksgiving. He broke the bread, gave it to them, and said, "This is my body, which is given up for you. Do this to remember me."

Jubilee Bible 2000
And taking bread, having given thanks, he broke it and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of me.

King James 2000 Bible
And he took bread, and gave thanks, and broke it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

American King James Version
And he took bread, and gave thanks, and broke it, and gave to them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

American Standard Version
And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he brake it, and gave to them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And taking bread, he gave thanks, and brake; and gave to them, saying: This is my body, which is given for you. Do this for a commemoration of me.

Darby Bible Translation
And having taken a loaf, when he had given thanks, he broke [it], and gave [it] to them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

English Revised Version
And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he brake it, and gave to them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

Webster's Bible Translation
And he took bread, and gave thanks, and broke it, and gave to them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

Weymouth New Testament
Then, taking a Passover biscuit, He gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body which is being given on your behalf: this do in remembrance of me."

World English Bible
He took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and gave to them, saying, "This is my body which is given for you. Do this in memory of me."

Young's Literal Translation
And having taken bread, having given thanks, he brake and gave to them, saying, 'This is my body, that for you is being given, this do ye -- to remembrance of me.'
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

22:19,20 The Lord's supper is a sign or memorial of Christ already come, who by dying delivered us; his death is in special manner set before us in that ordinance, by which we are reminded of it. The breaking of Christ's body as a sacrifice for us, is therein brought to our remembrance by the breaking of bread. Nothing can be more nourishing and satisfying to the soul, than the doctrine of Christ's making atonement for sin, and the assurance of an interest in that atonement. Therefore we do this in rememberance of what He did for us, when he died for us; and for a memorial of what we do, in joining ourselves to him in an everlasting covenant. The shedding of Christ's blood, by which the atonement was made, is represented by the wine in the cup.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 19, 20. - And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gays unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me. Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you. Around these words, and the parallel passages in SS. Matthew and Mark, for more than a thousand years fierce theological disputes have raged. Men have gone gladly to prison and to death rather than renounce what they believed to be the true interpretation. Now, a brief exegetical commentary is not the place to enter into these sad controversies. It will be sufficient here to indicate some of the lines of thought which the prayerful earnest reader might wisely follow out so as to attain certain just ideas respecting the blessed rite here instituted - ideas which may suffice for a practical religious life. Now, we possess a Divine commentary on this sacrament instituted by our Lord. It is noticeable that St. John, whose Gospel was the latest or well-nigh the latest of the canonical writings of the New Testament, when at great length he relates the story of the last Passover evening and its teaching, does not allude to the institution of that famous service, which, when he wrote his Gospel, had become part of the settled experience of Church life. He presupposes it; for it had passed then into the ordinary life of the Church. In another and earlier portion of his Gospel, however, St. John (John 6:32-58) gives us a record of the Lord's discourse in the synagogue of Capernaum, in which Jesus, while speaking plainly to those who heard him at the time, gave by anticipation a commentary on the sacrament which he afterwards instituted. The truth which was taught in thin discourse is presented in a specific act and in a concrete form in the Holy Communion. In the fifty-third verse of that sixth chapter we read, "Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you." How is this now to be done? We reply that our Lord has clothed these ideas and brought them near to us in this sacrament; while, by his teaching in the sixth chapter of St. John, he guards this sacrament from being regarded on the one hand as an end in itself, or on the other as a mere symbol. Certain truths, great landmarks laid down in this discourse, have to be borne in mind.

(1) The separation of the flesh of the Son of man into flesh and blood (John 6:53) presupposes a violent death submitted to for the sake of others (John 6:51).

(2) Both these elements, the flesh and the blood, are to be appropriated individually by the believer (John 6:56).

(3) How appropriated? St. Bernard well answers the question which he asks: "What is it to eat his flesh and to drink his blood, but to share in his sufferings and to imitate the life he lived when with us in the flesh?" (St. Bernard, on Psalm 3:3). "If ye suffer with him, ye shall also reign with him." The Holy Eucharist is from one point of view a great truth dramatized, instituted for the purpose of bringing before men in a vivid manner the great truths above alluded to. But it is something more. It brings to the believer, to the faithful communicant, to the one who in humble adoring faith carries out to the best of his ability his Master's dying charge - it brings a blessing too great for us to measure by earthly language, too deep for us to fathom with human inquiry. For the partaking of this Holy Communion is, first, the Christian's solemn public confession of his faith in Christ crucified; his solemn private declaration that it is his deliberate wish to suffer with his Lord and for his Lord's sake; that it is, too, his firm purpose to imitate the earthly life lived by his Lord. The partaking of this Holy Communion, too, is the Christian's most solemn prayer for strength thus to suffer and to live. It is, too, his fervent expression of belief that this strength will be surely given to him. Further, the partaking of this Holy Communion is, above all, the Christian's most solemn prayer for living union with Christ - "that Christ may dwell in his heart by faith." It is, too, his fervent expression of belief that "then we dwell in Christ, and Christ in us; we are one with. Christ, and Christ with us." This confession, declaration, and prayer he constantly renews in obedience to the dying command of his Master. It is difficult to understand how any belief in a physical change in the elements of bread and wine, such as is involved in the theory of transubstantiation held in the Roman Church, or of consubstantiation in the Lutheran community, can be supposed to enhance the reverence of the communicant, or to augment the blessing promised. The words of the Lord, "This is my body... my blood," cannot surely be pressed, seeing that the same Divine Speaker was in his discourses in the habit of using imagery which could not literally be pressed, such as "I am the Bread of life," "I am the Door of the sheep," "I am the true Vine," etc. Nothing that can be conceived is more solemn than the simple rite, more awful in its grandeur, more Divine and far-reaching in its promises to the faithful believer. Human imaginings add nothing to this Divine mystery, which is connected at once with the Incarnation and the Atonement. They only serve to envelop it in a shroud of earth-born mist and cloud, and thus to dim if not to veil its Divine glory.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

And he took bread and gave thanks,.... Or blessed it, as in Matthew 26:26. Here begins the account of the Lord's supper after the passover was eaten;

and brake it, and gave unto them; the disciples, as is expressed in Matthew 26:26

saying, this is my body; See Gill on Matthew 26:26.

which is given for you; or will be given for you, as an offering for sin in your room and stead; and accordingly it was given into the hands of men, and of justice, and unto death. The phrase denotes the substitution and sacrifice of Christ in the room of his people, and the voluntariness of it; and is only mentioned by Luke in this account: the Apostle Paul writes, which is broken for you, 1 Corinthians 11:24 alluding to the breaking of the bread in the ordinance, and as expressing the bruises, wounds, sufferings, and death of Christ: the Ethiopic version here adds, "for the redemption of many".

This do in remembrance of me; that is, eat this bread in remembrance of my love to you, and in commemoration of my body being offered up for you. Observe this ordinance in the manner I now institute it, in time to come, in memory of what I am about to do for you; for this direction does not only regard the present time and action, but is intended as a rule to be observed by the churches of Christ in all ages, to his second coming: and it is to be observed, that the Lord's supper is not a reiteration, but a commemoration of the sacrifice of Christ. This phrase is only mentioned by Luke here, and by the Apostle Paul, who adds it also at the drinking of the cup, 1 Corinthians 11:24. The Persic version here reads, "do this perpetually in remembrance of me".



Luke 22:19 Additional Commentaries
Context
The Lord's Supper Instituted
18for I say to you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine from now on until the kingdom of God comes." 19And when He had taken some bread and given thanks, He broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me." 20And in the same way He took the cup after they had eaten, saying, "This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in My blood.…
Cross References
Matthew 14:19
And he directed the people to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish and looking up to heaven, he gave thanks and broke the loaves. Then he gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the people.

Matthew 15:36
Then he took the seven loaves and the fish, and when he had given thanks, he broke them and gave them to the disciples, and they in turn to the people.

1 Corinthians 10:16
Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ? And is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?
Treasury of Scripture

And he took bread, and gave thanks, and broke it, and gave to them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

he took.

Matthew 26:26-28 And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and broke …

Mark 14:22-24 And as they did eat, Jesus took bread, and blessed, and broke it, …

1 Corinthians 10:16 The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the …

1 Corinthians 11:23-29 For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered to you…

gave thanks.

Luke 22:17 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this, and divide …

Luke 24:30 And it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, …

John 6:23 (However, there came other boats from Tiberias near to the place …

1 Thessalonians 5:18 In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ …

is my.

Luke 22:20 Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament …

Genesis 41:26,27 The seven good cows are seven years; and the seven good ears are …

Ezekiel 37:11 Then he said to me, Son of man, these bones are the whole house of …

Daniel 2:38 And wherever the children of men dwell, the beasts of the field and …

Daniel 4:22-24 It is you, O king, that are grown and become strong: for your greatness …

Zechariah 5:7,8 And, behold, there was lifted up a talent of lead: and this is a …

1 Corinthians 10:4 And did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that …

Galatians 4:25 For this Agar is mount Sinai in Arabia, and answers to Jerusalem …

given.

John 6:51 I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat …

Galatians 1:4 Who gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this …

Ephesians 5:2 And walk in love, as Christ also has loved us…

Titus 2:14 Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, …

1 Peter 2:24 Who his own self bore our sins in his own body on the tree, that …

this do.

Psalm 78:4-6 We will not hide them from their children, showing to the generation …

Psalm 111:4 He has made his wonderful works to be remembered: the LORD is gracious …

Songs 1:4 Draw me, we will run after you: the king has brought me into his …

1 Corinthians 11:24 And when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, Take, eat: this …

Jump to Previous
Behalf Biscuit Body Brake Bread Broke Broken Memory Passover Praise Remembrance Thanks
Jump to Next
Behalf Biscuit Body Brake Bread Broke Broken Memory Passover Praise Remembrance Thanks
Links
Luke 22:19 NIV
Luke 22:19 NLT
Luke 22:19 ESV
Luke 22:19 NASB
Luke 22:19 KJV

Luke 22:19 Bible Apps
Luke 22:19 Bible Suite
Luke 22:19 Biblia Paralela
Luke 22:19 Chinese Bible
Luke 22:19 French Bible
Luke 22:19 German Bible

Alphabetical: And body bread broke do for gave given had he in is it me my of remembrance saying some taken thanks them This to took when which you

NT Gospels: Luke 22:19 He took bread and when he had (Luke Lu Lk) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools

Bible Hub
Luke 22:18
Top of Page
Top of Page