John 12:12
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
The next day the great crowd that had come for the festival heard that Jesus was on his way to Jerusalem.

New Living Translation
The next day, the news that Jesus was on the way to Jerusalem swept through the city. A large crowd of Passover visitors

English Standard Version
The next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem.

Berean Study Bible
The next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem.

Berean Literal Bible
On the next day the great crowd having come to the feast, having heard that Jesus is coming into Jerusalem,

New American Standard Bible
On the next day the large crowd who had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

King James Bible
On the next day much people that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The next day, when the large crowd that had come to the festival heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

International Standard Version
The next day, the large crowd that had come to the festival heard that Jesus was coming into Jerusalem.

NET Bible
The next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem.

New Heart English Bible
On the next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And the next day a great crowd which had come to the feast, when they heard that Yeshua had come to Jerusalem,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
On the next day the large crowd that had come to the Passover festival heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem.

New American Standard 1977
On the next day the great multitude who had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Jubilee Bible 2000
On the next day the multitude that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

King James 2000 Bible
On the next day many people that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

American King James Version
On the next day much people that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

American Standard Version
On the morrow a great multitude that had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Douay-Rheims Bible
And on the next day, a great multitude that was to come to the festival day, when they had heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Darby Bible Translation
On the morrow a great crowd who came to the feast, having heard that Jesus is coming into Jerusalem,

English Revised Version
On the morrow a great multitude that had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Webster's Bible Translation
On the next day, many people that had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Weymouth New Testament
The next day a great crowd of those who had come to the Festival, hearing that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

World English Bible
On the next day a great multitude had come to the feast. When they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

Young's Literal Translation
On the morrow, a great multitude that came to the feast, having heard that Jesus doth come to Jerusalem,
Study Bible
The Triumphal Entry
11for on account of him many of the Jews were deserting them and believing in Jesus. 12The next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. 13They took palm branches and went out to meet Him, shouting: “Hosanna!” “Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!” “Blessed is the King of Israel!”…
Cross References
Matthew 21:4
This took place to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet:

Mark 11:7
They led the colt to Jesus and threw their cloaks over it, and He sat on it.

Luke 19:35
Then they brought the colt to Jesus, threw their cloaks over it, and put Jesus on it.

John 12:1
Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, the hometown of Lazarus, whom He had raised from the dead.

John 12:9
Meanwhile a large crowd of Jews learned that Jesus was there. And they came not only because of Him, but also to see Lazarus, whom He had raised from the dead.

John 12:18
That is also why the crowd went out to meet Him, because they heard that He had performed this sign.
Treasury of Scripture

On the next day much people that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

much.

Matthew 21:8 And a very great multitude spread their garments in the way; others …

come.

John 11:55,56 And the Jews' passover was near at hand: and many went out of the …

(12) In the section which follows (John 12:12-19), we again meet with matter which is common to St. John and the earlier Gospels. The Entry into Jerusalem is described by each of the evangelists, and the outer incidents are told more briefly by St. John than by any one of the others. (Comp. Notes on Matthew 21:1-11; Mark 11:1-11; Luke 19:29-44.)

On the next day.--See Note on John 12:1. St. John only gives us this definite note of time, connecting the Entry with the previous sojourn at Bethany. The Synoptic narrative is more general, describing the approach from Jericho, and naming Bethphage (Matt. and Luke) and Bethany (Mark and Luke) as stages in the journey, but not connecting the Supper at Bethany with the Entry.

When they heard that Jesus was coming.--They heard probably from those of the Jews (John 12:9) who had gone to Bethany. Note that these multitudes are not called Jews, though, of course, in the ordinary sense they were so. They were not "Jews" in the sense in which St. John uses the word, and he describes them as "much people that were come to the feast." (Comp. John 11:54.)

Verses 12-19. -

3. The triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Christ's challenge of the authorities, and its results. (On the differences between John's account of this transaction and that of the synoptic narrative, cf. commentaries, Matthew 21:1-11; Mark 11:1-10; Luke 19:29-44.) On the precise order of events it is difficult to speak with absolute decision. The main difference between the synoptists and John is in the break at Bethany of the journey from Jericho to Jerusalem, to introduce a feast, which is related afterwards by the synoptists, though not limited by them to any later chronological position. It should be observed, moreover, that the synoptic narrative contains numerous references to the residence in Bethany during several days of the week (cf. Mark 11:12; Matthew 21:17) which followed. John adds important details, and while he omits the great discussions in the temple, the withering of the fig tree, the cleansing of the temple, the parables of the judgments on scribes and Pharisees, and the prophecy of the future, he portrays the inner life of the Lord, and records his most gracious esoteric teaching and sublime prayer. The current tradition of the Church, the distinct note of time for Christ's arrival at Bethany (six days before the Passover), make the triumphal entry take place on Sunday afternoon (cf. ver. 1) of Passion week. Verses 12, 13. - The next day (on the morrow) must be the day after the feast. We have seen that that feast probably took place on the evening of the sabbath. The events that happened are far more abundantly described in Matthew, Mark, and Luke - the excitement in Jerusalem, the method in which the triumph was carried through, the mode adopted to secure "the young ass," the weeping ever Jerusalem from the summit of the hill; none of these circumstances are inconsistent with this account. Brief, however, as our narrative is, it adds some features which are peculiar and highly historic. A vast crowd that had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. These that had come from the country, and had already encamped near or in Jerusalem, came group after group to Bethany to escort him into the city. The synoptists, not mentioning the pause of the sabbath at Bethany, and not clearly indicating where and when the feast at Bethany took place, naturally connect the journey from Jericho with the entrance into Jerusalem. John explains, in addition, that there were of the Jerusalemites themselves certain who had been led to go to Bethany and throw in their lot with the Lord. The early pilgrims mentioned in John 11:55, 56, also came forth from the city to hail and welcome his approach. Took branches of the palm trees, and went forth to meet him. The synoptists had mentioned that the triumphant host had cut "branches," κλάδους (Matthew 21:8), from the trees, and Mark (Mark 11:8) had said στιβάδας, fragments of trees, grass, small branches, that could be strewn in the way. Luke (Luke 19:35) simply mentions the garments thus strewn - a fact mentioned also by Mark and Matthew. Our narrative gives greater definiteness, and even adds a new feature, by speaking of τὰ βαία τῶν φοινίκων, "the palm branches of the palm trees," which they waved probably in triumph, as they had been accustomed to do in token of the approach of a conqueror (cf. 1 Macc. 13:51, where Simon's return to the city was celebrated with "thanksgiving and βαι'´ων and with harps and cymbals," etc.). The use to which the branches of the well-known palm trees were put, differs from, but does not exclude, the use to which κλάδοι and στοιβάδες were also put. Bethany (see note, John 11:1) was "the house of dates," and the palm branches for the Feast of Tabernacles, on its first celebration after the Captivity (cf. Leviticus 23:40), Were fetched from the mount (Nehemiah 8:15). The palm tree was a sacred symbol for Israel "Tamar," a palm tree, was a favorite name for a woman. The Maccabaean coins were decorated with the palm and vine. The medal struck by Titus represented a captive sitting under a palm. Throughout their history, in their gorgeous temple ritual, it continually reappears, and at the last the Apocalypse represents the victorious songs of triumphant elders accompanied by the waving of the palm. If we compare the four accounts of the demonstration, we shall see again how in combination they vividly represent the whole scene. The multitude cry, according to - Matthew 21:9: "Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed be he that cometh in the Name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest." Mark 11:9, 10: "Hosanna; Blessed be he that cometh in the Name of the Lord: Blessed be the coming kingdom of our father David: Hosanna in the highest." Luke 19:38, remembering the angel's song: "They praised God with a loud voice.... Blessed be the King that cometh in the Name of the Lord: in heaven peace, and glory in the highest." John says they went forth to meet him, palm branch in hand, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed be he that cometh in the Name of the Lord, and (blessed be) (even) the King of Israel. These differences show how various groups used with freedom the tones and sentiment of the hundred and eighteenth psalm, adopting the welcome with which the priests were accustomed to greet the pilgrims to the festival. But each account demonstrates that, on this occasion, there was a general ascription to our Lord of Messianic honor. He is hailed by the people as King of Israel, as the Head of the coming kingdom of their father David, and as giving glory to God. The Name of the Lord is the manifestation and compendium of all the perfections of the Lord. For centuries the gracious hope had rung forth in the sacred liturgy, and now the people see that the hope is on the point of realization. On the next day, much people that were come to the feast,.... Of the passover; and they were much people indeed, that came yearly to this feast, from all parts of the nation; for all the males in Israel, were obliged to appear at this time; and though the women were not obliged, yet multitudes of them came, and the fame of Jesus might bring the more; add to which, that there was now a general expectation of the Messiah's coming, which brought the Jews from all parts of the world, to Jerusalem; so that this might be called indeed, , "a crowded passover": and though the following account is a stretching it too far, yet it may serve to illustrate this matter:

"would you desire to know what multitudes were at Jerusalem of the priests, you may know, as it is written, 1 Kings 8:63, and the tradition is, that an ox was offered for twenty four, and a sheep for eleven.--King Agrippa sought to know what was the number of the multitude, which were in Jerusalem; he said to the priests, lay by for me one kidney of every passover lamb; they laid by for him six hundred thousand pair of kidneys, double the number of those that came out of Egypt: and there is never a passover lamb, but there are more than ten numbered for it (m), &c.''

Now the day following the supper at Bethany, and which seems to be the first day of the week, this multitude of people,

when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem; from Bethany, which was soon known, it being so near.

(m) Echa Rabbati, fol. 42. 3, 4. Joh 12:12-19. Christ's Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem.

(See on [1838]Mt 21:1-9; and Lu 19:29-36).

12. On the next day—the Lord's day, or Sunday (see on [1839]Joh 12:1); the tenth day of the Jewish month Nisan, on which the paschal lamb was set apart to be "kept up until the fourteenth day of the same month, when the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel were to kill it in the evening" (Ex 12:3, 6). Even so, from the day of this solemn entry into Jerusalem, "Christ our Passover" was virtually set apart to be "sacrificed for us" (1Co 5:7).12:12-19 Christ's riding in triumph to Jerusalem is recorded by all the evangelists. Many excellent things, both in the word and providence of God, disciples do not understand at their first acquaintance with the things of God. The right understanding of spiritual nature of Christ's kingdom, prevents our misapplying the Scriptures which speak of it.
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