Ezra 4:7
New International Version
And in the days of Artaxerxes king of Persia, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel and the rest of his associates wrote a letter to Artaxerxes. The letter was written in Aramaic script and in the Aramaic language.

New Living Translation
Even later, during the reign of King Artaxerxes of Persia, the enemies of Judah, led by Bishlam, Mithredath, and Tabeel, sent a letter to Artaxerxes in the Aramaic language, and it was translated for the king.

English Standard Version
In the days of Artaxerxes, Bishlam and Mithredath and Tabeel and the rest of their associates wrote to Artaxerxes king of Persia. The letter was written in Aramaic and translated.

Berean Study Bible
And in the days of Artaxerxes king of Persia, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his associates wrote a letter to Artaxerxes. It was written in Aramaic and translated for the king. The Aramaic script read as follows:

New American Standard Bible
And in the days of Artaxerxes, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel and the rest of his colleagues wrote to Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the text of the letter was written in Aramaic and translated from Aramaic.

King James Bible
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions, unto Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian tongue, and interpreted in the Syrian tongue.

Christian Standard Bible
During the time of King Artaxerxes of Persia, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel and the rest of his colleagues wrote to King Artaxerxes. The letter was written in Aramaic and translated.

Contemporary English Version
Later, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and their advisors got together and wrote a letter to Artaxerxes when he was king of Persia. It was written in Aramaic and had to be translated.

Good News Translation
Again in the reign of Emperor Artaxerxes of Persia, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and their associates wrote a letter to the emperor. The letter was written in Aramaic and was to be translated when read.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
During the time of King Artaxerxes of Persia, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel and the rest of his colleagues wrote to King Artaxerxes. The letter was written in Aramaic and translated.

International Standard Version
While Artaxerxes was king of Persia, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their co-conspirators wrote in the Aramaic language and script to King Artaxerxes of Persia. Aramaic:

NET Bible
And during the reign of Artaxerxes, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their colleagues wrote to King Artaxerxes of Persia. This letter was first written in Aramaic but then translated. [Aramaic:]

New Heart English Bible
In the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his companions, to Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in Aramaic, and set forth in the Aramaic language.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their group wrote to him when Artaxerxes was king of Persia. The letter was written with the Aramaic script and translated into the Aramaic language.

JPS Tanakh 1917
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his companions, unto Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Aramaic character, and set forth in the Aramaic tongue.

New American Standard 1977
And in the days of Artaxerxes, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his colleagues, wrote to Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the text of the letter was written in Aramaic and translated from Aramaic.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions, unto Artaxerxes, king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian tongue and interpreted in the Syrian tongue.

King James 2000 Bible
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions, unto Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in Aramaic, and set forth in the Aramaic language.

American King James Version
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions, to Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian tongue, and interpreted in the Syrian tongue.

American Standard Version
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his companions, unto Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian character , and set forth in the Syrian tongue .

Brenton Septuagint Translation
And in the days of Arthasastha, Tabeel wrote peaceably to Mithradates and to the rest of his fellow-servants: the tribute-gatherer wrote to Arthasastha king of the Persians a writing in the Syrian tongue, and the same interpreted.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And in the days of Artaxerxes, Beselam, Mithridates, and Thabeel, and the rest that were in the council wrote to Artaxerxes king of the Persians : and the letter of accusation was written in Syriac, and was read in the Syrian tongue.

Darby Bible Translation
And in the days of Artaxerxes, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his companions, wrote to Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in Aramaic, and interpreted in Aramaic.

English Revised Version
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his companions, unto Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian character, and set forth in the Syrian tongue.

Webster's Bible Translation
And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions to Artaxerxes king of Persia, and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian language, and interpreted in the Syrian language.

World English Bible
In the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his companions, to Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian [character], and set forth in the Syrian [language].

Young's Literal Translation
and in the days of Artaxerxes have Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his companions written unto Artaxerxes king of Persia, and the writing of the letter is written in Aramaean, and interpreted in Aramaean.
Study Bible
Opposition under Xerxes and Artaxerxes
6At the beginning of the reign of Xerxes, an accusation was lodged against the people of Judah and Jerusalem. 7And in the days of Artaxerxes king of Persia, Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of his associates wrote a letter to Artaxerxes. It was written in Aramaic and translated for the king. The Aramaic script read as follows: 8Rehum the commander and Shimshai the scribe wrote a letter against Jerusalem to King Artaxerxes as follows:…
Cross References
2 Kings 18:26
Then Eliakim son of Hilkiah, along with Shebnah and Joah, said to the Rab-shakeh, "Please speak to your servants in Aramaic, since we understand it. Do not speak to us in Hebrew in the hearing of the people on the wall."

Ezra 4:1
When the enemies of Judah and Benjamin heard that the exiles were building a temple for the LORD, the God of Israel,

Ezra 4:8
Rehum the commander and Shimshai the scribe wrote a letter against Jerusalem to King Artaxerxes as follows:

Ezra 8:36
They also delivered the king's edicts to the royal satraps and governors of the region west of the Euphrates, who proceeded to assist the people and the house of God.

Isaiah 36:11
Then Eliakim, Shebna, and Joah said to the Rab-shakeh, "Please speak to your servants in Aramaic, since we understand it. Do not speak to us in Hebrew in the hearing of the people on the wall."

Daniel 2:4
Then the astrologers answered the king in Aramaic, "O king, may you live forever! Tell your servants the dream, and we will give the interpretation."

Treasury of Scripture

And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions, to Artaxerxes king of Persia; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian tongue, and interpreted in the Syrian tongue.

A.

Bishlam.

Ezra 4:9,17
Then wrote Rehum the chancellor, and Shimshai the scribe, and the rest of their companions; the Dinaites, the Apharsathchites, the Tarpelites, the Apharsites, the Archevites, the Babylonians, the Susanchites, the Dehavites, and the Elamites, …

Ezra 5:6
The copy of the letter that Tatnai, governor on this side the river, and Shetharboznai, and his companions the Apharsachites, which were on this side the river, sent unto Darius the king:

Ezra 7:27
Blessed be the LORD God of our fathers, which hath put such a thing as this in the king's heart, to beautify the house of the LORD which is in Jerusalem:

2 Kings 18:26
Then said Eliakim the son of Hilkiah, and Shebna, and Joah, unto Rabshakeh, Speak, I pray thee, to thy servants in the Syrian language; for we understand it: and talk not with us in the Jews' language in the ears of the people that are on the wall.

Isaiah 36:11
Then said Eliakim and Shebna and Joah unto Rabshakeh, Speak, I pray thee, unto thy servants in the Syrian language; for we understand it: and speak not to us in the Jews' language, in the ears of the people that are on the wall.







Lexicon
And in the days
וּבִימֵ֣י (ū·ḇî·mê)
Conjunctive waw, Preposition-b | Noun - masculine plural construct
Strong's Hebrew 3117: A day

of Artaxerxes king
אַרְתַּחְשַׁ֗שְׂתָּא (’ar·taḥ·šaś·tā)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 783: Artaxerxes -- a son and successor of Xerxes, king of Persia

of Persia,
פָּרָ֑ס (pā·rās)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 6539: Persia -- a country in west Asia which conquered Babylon

Bishlam,
בִּשְׁלָ֜ם (biš·lām)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 1312: Bishlam -- perhaps 'son of peace', a Pers

Mithredath,
מִתְרְדָ֤ת (miṯ·rə·ḏāṯ)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 4990: Mithredath -- two Persians

Tabeel,
טָֽבְאֵל֙ (ṭā·ḇə·’êl)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 2870: Tabeal -- 'good for nothing', an Aramean (Syrian)

and the rest
וּשְׁאָ֣ר (ū·šə·’ār)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's Hebrew 7605: Rest, residue, remnant

of
כנותו (kə·nā·wō·ṯōw)
Noun - masculine plural construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew

his associates
כְּנָוֺתָ֔יו (kə·nā·wō·ṯāw)
Noun - masculine plural construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3674: Associate, colleague

wrote [a letter]
כָּתַ֨ב (kā·ṯaḇ)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3789: To grave, to write

to
עַל־ (‘al-)
Preposition
Strong's Hebrew 5921: Above, over, upon, against

Artaxerxes.
אַרְתַּחְשַׁ֖שְׂתְּ (’ar·taḥ·šaśt)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 783: Artaxerxes -- a son and successor of Xerxes, king of Persia

[It]
הַֽנִּשְׁתְּוָ֔ן (han·niš·tə·wān)
Article | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 5406: An epistle

was written
כָּת֥וּב (kā·ṯūḇ)
Verb - Qal - QalPassParticiple - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3789: To grave, to write

in Aramaic
אֲרָמִ֖ית (’ă·rā·mîṯ)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 762: The language of Aram (Syria)

and translated [for the king].
וּמְתֻרְגָּ֥ם (ū·mə·ṯur·gām)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Pual - Participle - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 8638: To interpret, translate

The Aramaic script [read as follows]:
אֲרָמִֽית׃ (’ă·rā·mîṯ)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 762: The language of Aram (Syria)
(7) In the days of Artaxerxes.--This must be Gomates, the Magian priest who personated Smerdis, the dead son of Cyrus, and reigned only seven months: note that the expression used is "days," and not "reign" as in the previous verse. This Artaxerxes has been thought by many commentators to be the Longimanus of the sequel of this book and of Nehemiah, and they have identified the Ahasuerus of Ezra and Esther with Xerxes. This would explain the reference to "the walls" in Ezra 4:12; but in Ezra 4:23-24 the sequence of events is strict, and the word "ceased" links the parts of the narrative into unity. Moreover, the Persian princes had often more than one name. At the same time, there is nothing to make such an anticipatory and parenthetical insertion impossible.

In the Syrian tongue.--The characters and the words were Syrian or Aramaic; this explains the transition to another language at this point,

Verse 7. - And in the days of Artaxerxes. See the comment on ver. 6. If Artaxerxes be the Pseudo-Smerdis, we can readily understand why an application was not made to him at once, and how it came about that the Jews recommenced their building, as they appear from vers. 12, 13 to have done. The Pseudo-Smerdis was a usurper; his reign was a time of partial anarchy; in a distant part of the empire it would not be known for a while who was king. Men would be thrown on themselves, and would do as it seemed good in their own eyes. Later, there may have been some doubt whether a king, who was known to be a religious reformer, would follow the policy of his predecessor with respect to the Jews, or reverse it. Hence a delay, and then a more formal application than before for a positive decree to stop the building (see ver. 21). The rest of their companions. Literally, of their companies - the abstract for the concrete. The writing of the letter was written in the Syrian tongue. Rather, "in the Syrian fashion," i.e. in Syriac characters. And interpreted in the Syrian tongue. Or "translated into the Syriac language." The character and the words were alike Syriac (comp. 2 Kings 18:26). Ezra gives the letter in Chaldee. 4:6-24 It is an old slander, that the prosperity of the church would be hurtful to kings and princes. Nothing can be more false, for true godliness teaches us to honour and obey our sovereign. But where the command of God requires one thing and the law of the land another, we must obey God rather than man, and patiently submit to the consequences. All who love the gospel should avoid all appearance of evil, lest they should encourage the adversaries of the church. The world is ever ready to believe any accusation against the people of God, and refuses to listen to them. The king suffered himself to be imposed upon by these frauds and falsehoods. Princes see and hear with other men's eyes and ears, and judge things as represented to them, which are often done falsely. But God's judgment is just; he sees things as they are.
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Alphabetical: a And Aramaic Artaxerxes associates Bishlam colleagues days from his in king language letter Mithredath of Persia rest script Tabeel text the to translated was written wrote

OT History: Ezra 4:7 In the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam (Ezr. Ez) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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