John 12:27
Parallel Verses
New International Version
"Now my soul is troubled, and what shall I say? 'Father, save me from this hour'? No, it was for this very reason I came to this hour.

New Living Translation
"Now my soul is deeply troubled. Should I pray, 'Father, save me from this hour'? But this is the very reason I came!

English Standard Version
“Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? But for this purpose I have come to this hour.

New American Standard Bible
"Now My soul has become troubled; and what shall I say, 'Father, save Me from this hour '? But for this purpose I came to this hour.

King James Bible
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
"Now My soul is troubled. What should I say--Father, save Me from this hour? But that is why I came to this hour.

International Standard Version
"Now my soul is in turmoil, and what should I say—'Father, save me from this hour'? No! It was for this very reason that I came to this hour.

NET Bible
"Now my soul is greatly distressed. And what should I say? 'Father, deliver me from this hour'? No, but for this very reason I have come to this hour.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
“Behold, now my soul is troubled, and what shall I say: My Father, deliver me from this hour? But for this I have come to this hour.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"I am too deeply troubled now to know how to express my feelings. Should I say, 'Father, save me from this time [of suffering]'? No! I came for this time of suffering.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour, but for this have I come in this hour.

King James 2000 Bible
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour.

American King James Version
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I to this hour.

American Standard Version
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this cause came I unto this hour.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this cause I came unto this hour.

Darby Bible Translation
Now is my soul troubled, and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But on account of this have I come to this hour.

English Revised Version
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this cause came I unto this hour.

Webster's Bible Translation
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause I came to this hour.

Weymouth New Testament
Now is my soul full of trouble; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this purpose I have come to this hour.

World English Bible
"Now my soul is troubled. What shall I say? 'Father, save me from this time?' But for this cause I came to this time.

Young's Literal Translation
'Now hath my soul been troubled, and what? shall I say -- Father, save me from this hour? -- but because of this I came to this hour;
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

12:27-33 The sin of our souls was the troubled of Christ's soul, when he undertook to redeem and save us, and to make his soul an offering for our sin. Christ was willing to suffer, yet prayed to be saved from suffering. Prayer against trouble may well agree with patience under it, and submission to the will of God in it. Our Lord Jesus undertook to satisfy God's injured honour, and he did it by humbling himself. The voice of the Father from heaven, which had declared him to be his beloved Son, at his baptism, and when he was transfigured, was heard proclaiming that He had both glorified his name, and would glorify it. Christ, reconciling the world to God by the merit of his death, broke the power of death, and cast out Satan as a destroyer. Christ, bringing the world to God by the doctrine of his cross, broke the power of sin, and cast out Satan as a deceiver. The soul that was at a distance from Christ, is brought to love him and trust him. Jesus was now going to heaven, and he would draw men's hearts to him thither. There is power in the death of Christ to draw souls to him. We have heard from the gospel that which exalts free grace, and we have heard also that which enjoins duty; we must from the heart embrace both, and not separate them.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 27-30. -

(2) The anticipation of Gethsemane. Verse 27. - Now, at this moment, has been and yet is my soul troubled ("concurrebat horror morris et ardor obedientisa," Bengel). In John 11:33 we hear that he troubled himself, and shuddered wrathfully in his "spirit" (πνεύμετι) at the contemplation of all the evils and curse of death; now his whole ψυχή, i.e. his life centered in its corporeal environment as a man, the self which the Son of God had taken up into the Divine essence, was in depth of agony, preluding the strong crying and tears to which Hebrews 5:7 refers. These perturbations of his soul and spirit can only be accounted for by the uniqueness of his Personality, the capacity for suffering, and the extent to which he was identifying himself with the sinful nature with which he had invested himself. Sin is the sting of death. He had by the nature of his incarnation become sin for us. Martyrs, freed from sin, delivered from its curse and shame and power through him, face it with calmness and hope; but there was infinite space in his breast for all the curse of it to rain its horrible tempest. He felt that the hour of his extremest travail had come upon him. And what shall I (must I) say? What is the regal passion of my heart? What is the right revelation for me to make to you? What is the prayer for me to offer to the Father? It remains a great question whether the next utterance is the primary answer of the question itself, or whether it continues the interrogation - whether, i.e., the Lord lifts up for a moment the cry of heart-rending grief, Father, save me from this hour! or whether he said, Shall I say, Father, save me from this hour? The first view supposes in the first place actual uncertainty and awful bewilderment, and then a most intense cry (Hebrews 5:7) to him who was able to save him from death. Save me either from the death itself, or from the fear and horror which accompanies it (Lucke, Meyer, Hengstenberg, and Moulton). It need not be a prayer to leave the world unsaved, to sacrifice all the work on which he had come. We are told by the apostle (Hebrews 5:7) that he was "heard" (ἀπὸ τῆς εὐλαβείας) and delivered from human weakness which might have rebelled in the intolerable darkness of that hour. Father, save me from this hour; the equivalent to the prayer, "If it be possible, let this cup pass from me," with its grand "nevertheless," etc. If this be its meaning, we have a scene nearly, if not closely, identifiable with the agony of the garden. The correction which immediately follows augments the comparison with the scene in Gethsemane recorded by the synoptists. The R.T. and Revised Version have put their note of interrogation after ταύτης into the margin, and not into the text. Ewald, Lange, Kling, Tholuck, Lachmann, accept this punctuation, and Godet regards it as an hypothetical prayer, although he does not place the interrogation after ταύτης. The self-interrogation of the previous utterance at least reveals the presence of such a desire, but one which vanishes as the mysterious hour engulfs and wraps him round. If this be the true interpretation, then the clause that follows must be, Nay this I cannot say, for on account of this very conflict - for this cause - only to fight this great battle - I came steadily forward to this hour. I cannot pray to escape from it. If, however, we have the expression of an actual though momentary prayer, and if we give it the meaning, "bring me safely through and out of this hour," it corresponds with the Divine trust in the Father's love which, in the extremity of the anguish and desertion, he yet reveals, and the ἀλλά becomes equivalent to "Pray, this I need not say; the end is known" (Westcott). I know that I shall be delivered, for this cause, viz. that I should encounter and pass through the hour I came into the world, and have reached the final crisis. This is, to my mind, more satisfactory; the interrogative prayer gives a sentimental character to the utterance out of harmony with the theme. Godet thinks that the fact that, according to the synoptists, our Lord in the garden did actually offer the prayer which he here hesitates to present, is evidence of the historic character of both accounts. I differ from him, because the sublime answer to the prayer here given would seem to preclude the necessity of the final conflict. The circumstance that he did offer the prayer as interpreted above, a prayer which was veritably heard, is in harmony with the narrative of the agony.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Now is my soul troubled,.... At the hardness and unbelief of the Jews, and the rejection of them, when the Gentiles would be called, and converted, by which he would be glorified: and at the conduct and carriage of his disciples to him, he had a foreknowledge of; at the betraying of him by one, and the denial of him by another, and the flight of them all from him; and at the devil, and the furious and violent attack he knew he would make upon him, though he had obliged him to leave him, when he assaulted him before, and knew he could find nothing in him now, and that as God, he was able to destroy him; but this was to be done by him, as man, and by lying too: he was in his human soul troubled at the thoughts of his death, though it was his Father's will, and he had agreed to it, and was for the salvation of his people, his heart was so much set upon; yet it was terrible to the human nature, and especially as attended with the wrath of God; at the apprehensions of which, his soul was exceedingly troubled; not as about to fall on him on his own personal account, but as being the surety of his people, and as having their sins upon him to satisfy angry and injured justice for:

and what shall I say? this question he puts, as being in the utmost distress, and difficulty, as if he knew not what to say; and yet not as advising with his disciples, what was to be said or done in his case; but is rather used to introduce another question, as the following words may be formed: shall I say,

father, save me from this hour? as requesting his Father, that he might be strengthened under his sufferings and death, and carried through them, and out of them; or rather as deprecating them, desiring the cup might pass from him, as he afterwards did; and then the sense is, shall I put up such a petition to my Father, to save me from sorrows, sufferings, and death? no, I will not: the human nature through frailty might prompt him to it, and he be just going to do it, when he corrects himself, saying;

but for this cause came I unto this hour: this hour or time of sorrow and suffering was appointed for him; it was fixed in the covenant of grace, and Christ had agreed to it; he was sent into this world, and he came into it, on account of this hour; and was preserved hitherto for this purpose; and was now come to Jerusalem, and was there at this instant, for that very reason, namely, to suffer and die. And since this was the case, he would not put up such a petition to his Father, but the following one.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

27, 28. Now is my soul troubled—He means at the prospect of His death, just alluded to. Strange view of the Cross this, immediately after representing it as the hour of His glory! (Joh 12:23). But the two views naturally meet, and blend into one. It was the Greeks, one might say, that troubled Him. Ah! they shall see Jesus, but to Him it shall be a costly sight.

and what shall I say?—He is in a strait betwixt two. The death of the cross was, and could not but be, appalling to His spirit. But to shrink from absolute subjection to the Father, was worse still. In asking Himself, "What shall I say?" He seems as if thinking aloud, feeling His way between two dread alternatives, looking both of them sternly in the face, measuring, weighing them, in order that the choice actually made might be seen, and even by himself the more vividly felt, to be a profound, deliberate, spontaneous election.

Father, save me from this hour—To take this as a question—"Shall I say, Father, save me," &c.—as some eminent editors and interpreters do, is unnatural and jejune. It is a real petition, like that in Gethsemane, "Let this cup pass from Me"; only whereas there He prefaces the prayer with an "If it be possible," here He follows it up with what is tantamount to that—"Nevertheless for this cause came I unto this hour." The sentiment conveyed, then, by the prayer, in both cases, is twofold: (1) that only one thing could reconcile Him to the death of the cross—its being His Father's will He should endure it—and (2) that in this view of it He yielded Himself freely to it. What He recoils from is not subjection to His Father's will: but to show how tremendous a self-sacrifice that obedience involved, He first asks the Father to save Him from it, and then signifies how perfectly He knows that He is there for the very purpose of enduring it. Only by letting these mysterious words speak their full meaning do they become intelligible and consistent. As for those who see no bitter elements in the death of Christ—nothing beyond mere dying—what can they make of such a scene? and when they place it over against the feelings with which thousands of His adoring followers have welcomed death for His sake, how can they hold Him up to the admiration of men?

John 12:27 Additional Commentaries
Context
Jesus Predicts His Death
26"If anyone serves Me, he must follow Me; and where I am, there My servant will be also; if anyone serves Me, the Father will honor him. 27"Now My soul has become troubled; and what shall I say, 'Father, save Me from this hour '? But for this purpose I came to this hour. 28"Father, glorify Your name." Then a voice came out of heaven: "I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again."…
Cross References
Psalm 6:3
My soul is in deep anguish. How long, LORD, how long?

Matthew 11:25
At that time Jesus said, "I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children.

Matthew 11:26
Yes, Father, for this is what you were pleased to do.

Matthew 26:38
Then he said to them, "My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death. Stay here and keep watch with me."

Matthew 26:45
Then he returned to the disciples and said to them, "Are you still sleeping and resting? Look, the hour has come, and the Son of Man is delivered into the hands of sinners.

Mark 14:34
"My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death," he said to them. "Stay here and keep watch."

John 11:33
When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come along with her also weeping, he was deeply moved in spirit and troubled.

John 12:23
Jesus replied, "The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified.
Treasury of Scripture

Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I to this hour.

is.

John 11:33-35 When Jesus therefore saw her weeping, and the Jews also weeping which …

John 13:21 When Jesus had thus said, he was troubled in spirit, and testified, …

Psalm 69:1-3 Save me, O God; for the waters are come in to my soul…

Psalm 88:3 For my soul is full of troubles: and my life draws near to the grave.

Isaiah 53:3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted …

Matthew 26:38,39,42 Then said he to them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even to death: …

Mark 14:33-36 And he takes with him Peter and James and John, and began to be sore …

Luke 22:44,53 And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly: and his sweat was …

Hebrews 5:7 Who in the days of his flesh…

what.

Isaiah 38:15 What shall I say? he has both spoken to me, and himself has done …

Luke 12:49,50 I am come to send fire on the earth; and what will I, if it be already …

Father.

John 11:41 Then they took away the stone from the place where the dead was laid. …

Matthew 26:53,54 Think you that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he shall presently …

but.

John 18:37 Pilate therefore said to him, Are you a king then? Jesus answered, …

Luke 22:53 When I was daily with you in the temple, you stretched forth no hands …

1 Timothy 1:15 This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ …

Hebrews 2:14 For as much then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, …

Hebrews 10:5-9 Why when he comes into the world, he said, Sacrifice and offering …

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