Job 39:13
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
"The wings of the ostrich flap joyfully, though they cannot compare with the wings and feathers of the stork.

New Living Translation
"The ostrich flaps her wings grandly, but they are no match for the feathers of the stork.

English Standard Version
“The wings of the ostrich wave proudly, but are they the pinions and plumage of love?

New American Standard Bible
"The ostriches' wings flap joyously With the pinion and plumage of love,

King James Bible
Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The wings of the ostrich flap joyfully, but are her feathers and plumage like the stork's?

International Standard Version
"The wings of the ostrich flap joyously, but aren't its pinions and feathers like the stork?

NET Bible
"The wings of the ostrich flap with joy, but are they the pinions and plumage of a stork?

New Heart English Bible
"The wings of the ostrich wave proudly; but are they the feathers and plumage of love?

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"Does the ostrich flap its wings in joy, or do its wings lack feathers?

JPS Tanakh 1917
The wing of the ostrich beateth joyously; But are her pinions and feathers the kindly stork's?

New American Standard 1977
“The ostriches’ wings flap joyously
            With the pinion and plumage of love,

Jubilee Bible 2000
Didst thou give beautiful wings unto the peacock, or wings and feathers unto the ostrich?

King James 2000 Bible
Gave you the proud wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich?

American King James Version
Gave you the goodly wings to the peacocks? or wings and feathers to the ostrich?

American Standard Version
The wings of the ostrich wave proudly; But are they the pinions and plumage of love?

Douay-Rheims Bible
The wing of the ostrich is like the wings of the heron, and of the hawk.

Darby Bible Translation
The wing of the ostrich beats joyously -- But is it the stork's pinion and plumage?

English Revised Version
The wing of the ostrich rejoiceth, but are her pinions and feathers kindly?

Webster's Bible Translation
Gavest thou the goodly wings to the peacocks? or wings and feathers to the ostrich!

World English Bible
"The wings of the ostrich wave proudly; but are they the feathers and plumage of love?

Young's Literal Translation
The wing of the rattling ones exulteth, Whether the pinion of the ostrich or hawk.
Study Bible
God Speaks of His Creation
12"Will you have faith in him that he will return your grain And gather it from your threshing floor? 13"The ostriches' wings flap joyously With the pinion and plumage of love, 14For she abandons her eggs to the earth And warms them in the dust,…
Cross References
Leviticus 11:16
and the ostrich and the owl and the sea gull and the hawk in its kind,

Job 39:12
"Will you have faith in him that he will return your grain And gather it from your threshing floor?

Job 39:14
For she abandons her eggs to the earth And warms them in the dust,
Treasury of Scripture

Gave you the goodly wings to the peacocks? or wings and feathers to the ostrich?

peacocks

1 Kings 10:22 For the king had at sea a navy of Tharshish with the navy of Hiram: …

2 Chronicles 9:21 For the king's ships went to Tarshish with the servants of Huram: …

wings and feathers unto the. or, the feathers of the stork and

Job 30:29 I am a brother to dragons, and a companion to owls.

Leviticus 11:19 And the stork, the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.

Psalm 104:17 Where the birds make their nests: as for the stork, the fir trees are her house.

Jeremiah 8:7 Yes, the stork in the heaven knows her appointed times; and the turtle …

Zechariah 5:9 Then lifted I up my eyes, and looked, and, behold, there came out …

(13) Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks?--Rather, The wing of the ostrich is superb, but are her pinions and her feathers like the stork's? Ostrich feathers are said to be worth from 8 to 15 a pound; but, beautiful and valuable as they are, they are hardly like the plumage of a bird, and are not so used for flight; on the contrary, the ostrich runs like a quadruped, it is stated at the rate sometimes of fifty or sixty miles an hour.

Verse 13. - Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? rather, the wing of the ostrich (literally, of ostriches) is exultant; i.e. a thing that it glories in. The allusion is, perhaps, to the flapping of its wings by the ostrich, as it hurries over the ground, which is sore, thing like that of a cock before crowing or after beating an antagonist. Or wings and feathers unto the ostrich? This clause is very obscure, but may perhaps mean, Are her feathers and plumage kindly? (see the Revised Version); i.e. does she use them for the same kindly purpose as other birds - to warm her eggs, and forward the process of hatching them? Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks?.... Rather "ostriches", as the Vulgate Latin and Tigurine versions render it; some render it, "the wing of those that exult is joyful", so Montanus; that is, of the ostriches; who, in confidence of their wings, exult and glory over the horse and his rider, Job 39:18; for peacocks are not remarkable for their wings, but for their tails; whereas the wings of the ostrich are as sails unto them, as several writers observe (k); and with which they rather run, or row, than fly: hence it is called by Plautus (l) "passer marinus", the sea sparrow: and the feathers of it are more goodly than those of the wings of the peacock; and besides, it is a question whether the peacock was where Job 54ed, and in his times; since it is originally from the Indies, and from thence it was brought to Judea in the times of Solomon; and was not known in Greece and Rome (m) until later ages. Alexander the Great, when he first saw them in India, was surprised at them; and yet Solon (n) speaks of them in his time as seen by him, which was at least two hundred years before Alexander; though at Rome not common in the times of Horace (o), who calls a peacock "rara avis"; and speaks of them as sold for a great price; but ostriches were well known in Arabia, where Job 54ed, as is testified by Xenophon (p), Strabo (q), and Diodorus Siculus (r). Moreover, what is said in the following verses is only true of the ostrich, and that only is spoken of here and there, as it follows;

or wings and feathers unto the ostrich; or whose wings and feathers are like the storks; and so Bochart renders the words, truly they have "the wing and feather of the stork"; the colours of which are black and white, from whence it has its name (s) in Greek; and so Leo Africanus (t) says of the ostriches, that they have in their wings large feathers of a black and white colour; and this was a creature well known in Arabia (u), in which Job 54ed.

(k) Xenophon. de Expedit. Cyri, l. 1. Aelian. de. Animal. l. 2. c. 77. (l) Persa, Acts 2. Sc. 2. v. 17. (m) Aelian. de Animal. l. 5. c. 21. (n) Laert. Vit. Solon. l. 1. c. 2.((o) Sermon. l. 2. Sat. 2. v. 25, 26. Vid. Plin. Nat. Hist. l. 10. c. 20. Macrob. Saturnal. l. 3. c. 13. (p) Ut supra. (Xenophon. de Expedit. Cyri, l. 1.) (q) Geograph. l. 16. p. 531. (r) Bibliothec. l. 2. p. 133. (s) Suidas in voce (t) Descriptio Africae, l. 9. p. 766. (u) Diodor. Sicul. ut supra. (Bibliothec. l. 2. p. 133.) 13. Rather, "the wing of the ostrich hen"—literally, "the crying bird"; as the Arab name for it means "song"; referring to its night cries (Job 30:29; Mic 1:8) vibrating joyously. "Is it not like the quill and feathers of the pious bird" (the stork)? [Umbreit]. The vibrating, quivering wing, serving for sail and oar at once, is characteristic of the ostrich in full course. Its white and black feathers in the wing and tail are like the stork's. But, unlike that bird, the symbol of parental love in the East, it with seeming want of natural (pious) affection deserts its young. Both birds are poetically called by descriptive, instead of their usual appellative, names.39:1-30 God inquires of Job concerning several animals. - In these questions the Lord continued to humble Job. In this chapter several animals are spoken of, whose nature or situation particularly show the power, wisdom, and manifold works of God. The wild ass. It is better to labour and be good for something, than to ramble and be good for nothing. From the untameableness of this and other creatures, we may see, how unfit we are to give law to Providence, who cannot give law even to a wild ass's colt. The unicorn, a strong, stately, proud creature. He is able to serve, but not willing; and God challenges Job to force him to it. It is a great mercy if, where God gives strength for service, he gives a heart; it is what we should pray for, and reason ourselves into, which the brutes cannot do. Those gifts are not always the most valuable that make the finest show. Who would not rather have the voice of the nightingale, than the tail of the peacock; the eye of the eagle and her soaring wing, and the natural affection of the stork, than the beautiful feathers of the ostrich, which can never rise above the earth, and is without natural affection? The description of the war-horse helps to explain the character of presumptuous sinners. Every one turneth to his course, as the horse rushes into the battle. When a man's heart is fully set in him to do evil, and he is carried on in a wicked way, by the violence of his appetites and passions, there is no making him fear the wrath of God, and the fatal consequences of sin. Secure sinners think themselves as safe in their sins as the eagle in her nest on high, in the clefts of the rocks; but I will bring thee down from thence, saith the Lord, #Jer 49:16". All these beautiful references to the works of nature, should teach us a right view of the riches of the wisdom of Him who made and sustains all things. The want of right views concerning the wisdom of God, which is ever present in all things, led Job to think and speak unworthily of Providence.
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OT Poetry: Job 39:13 The wings of the ostrich wave proudly (Jb) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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