Job 39:26
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
"Does the hawk take flight by your wisdom and spread its wings toward the south?

New Living Translation
"Is it your wisdom that makes the hawk soar and spread its wings toward the south?

English Standard Version
“Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars and spreads his wings toward the south?

New American Standard Bible
"Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars, Stretching his wings toward the south?

King James Bible
Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Does the hawk take flight by your understanding and spread its wings to the south?

International Standard Version
"Is it by your understanding that the hawk flies, spreading its wings toward the south?

NET Bible
"Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars, and spreads its wings toward the south?

New Heart English Bible
"Is it by your wisdom that the hawk soars, and stretches her wings toward the south?

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"Does your understanding make a bird of prey fly and spread its wings toward the south?

JPS Tanakh 1917
Doth the hawk soar by thy wisdom, And stretch her wings toward the south?

New American Standard 1977
“Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars,
            Stretching his wings toward the south?

Jubilee Bible 2000
Does the hawk fly by thy industry and stretch her wings toward the south?

King James 2000 Bible
Does the hawk fly by your wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south?

American King James Version
Does the hawk fly by your wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south?

American Standard Version
Is it by thy wisdom that the hawk soareth, (And) stretcheth her wings toward the south?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Doth the hawk wax feathered by thy wisdom, spreading her wings to the south?

Darby Bible Translation
Doth the hawk fly by thine intelligence, [and] stretch his wings toward the south?

English Revised Version
Doth the hawk soar by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south?

Webster's Bible Translation
Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings towards the south?

World English Bible
"Is it by your wisdom that the hawk soars, and stretches her wings toward the south?

Young's Literal Translation
By thine understanding flieth a hawk? Spreadeth he his wings to the south?
Study Bible
God Speaks of His Creation
25"As often as the trumpet sounds he says, 'Aha!' And he scents the battle from afar, And the thunder of the captains and the war cry. 26"Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars, Stretching his wings toward the south? 27"Is it at your command that the eagle mounts up And makes his nest on high?…
Cross References
Job 39:25
"As often as the trumpet sounds he says, 'Aha!' And he scents the battle from afar, And the thunder of the captains and the war cry.

Job 39:27
"Is it at your command that the eagle mounts up And makes his nest on high?
Treasury of Scripture

Does the hawk fly by your wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south?

the hawk (Netz, Arabic naz, Latin nisus, the hawk, so called from natzah, to shoot away, fly, because of the rapidity of its flight. It probably comprehends various species of the falcon family, as the ger-falcon, goshawk, and sparrowhawk.)

Leviticus 16:11 And Aaron shall bring the bullock of the sin offering, which is for …

Deuteronomy 14:15 And the owl, and the night hawk, and the cuckow, and the hawk after his kind,

stretch (Is it through thy teaching that the falcon, or any other bird of passage, knows the precise time for taking flight, and the direction in which she is to go to arrive at a warmer climate?)

Songs 2:12 The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds …

Jeremiah 8:7 Yes, the stork in the heaven knows her appointed times; and the turtle …

(26) Doth the hawk fly?--The more symmetrical order of these descriptions would be for the ostrich to have come after the war-horse and before the hawk; in that case there would have been a gradual transition from the fleetest of quadrupeds to the fleetest of birds by means of the ostrich, which, though winged like a bird, cannot use its wings as birds do, but only run on the ground like a quadruped.

Verse 26. - Doth the hawk fly (or, soar) by thy wisdom? The hawk's strength of wing is extraordinary, and one of the greatest of natural marvels. Can Job claim to have contrived it? Many as have been the attempts made, human ingenuity has not yet devised anything that can fly. And stretch her wings toward the south? Migrate, i.e., when winter approaches, to the warmer southern regions. Few things in nature are more remarkable than the instinct of migratory birds. Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom,.... With so much swiftness, steadiness, and constancy, until she has seized her prey. The Vulgate Latin version and some others read, "does she become feathered", or "begin to have feathers?" and so Bochart: either when first fledged; or when, as it is said (d) she casts her old feathers and gets new ones, and this every year. Now neither her flight nor her feathers, whether at one time or the other, are owing to men, but to the Lord, who gives both;

and stretch her wings towards the south? Being a bird of passage, she moves from colder climates towards the winter, and steers her course to the south towards warmer ones (e); which she does by an instinct in nature, put into her by the Lord, and not through the instruction of man. Or, as some say, casting off her old feathers, she flies towards the south for warmth; and that her feathers may be cherished with the heat, and grow the sooner and better. Hence it is, perhaps, as Aelianus reports (f), that this bird was by the Egyptians consecrated to Apollo or the sun; it being able to look upon the rays of it wistly, constantly, and easily, without being hurt thereby. Porphyry (g) says, that this bird is not only acceptable to the sun; but has divinity in it, according to the Egyptians; and is no other than Osiris, or the sun represented by the image of it (h). Strabo (i) speaks of a city of the hawks, where this creature is worshipped. It has its name in Greek from the sacredness of it; and according to Hesiod (k), is very swift, and has large wings. It is called swift in flying, by Manetho (l); and by Homer, , the swiftest of fowls (m). It has its name from to "fly", as Kimchi observes (n). Cyril of Jerusalem, on the authority of the Greek version, affirms (o), that by a divine instinct or order, the hawk, stretching out its wings, stands in the midst of the air unmoved, looking towards the south. All accounts show it to be a bird that loves warmth, which is the reason of the expression in the text.

(d) Aelian. de Animal. l. 12. c. 4. (e) Ibid. l. 2. c. 43. Plin. l. 10. c. 8. (f) De Animal. l. 7. c. 9. & l. 10. c. 14. (g) De Abstinentia, l. 4. s. 9. (h) Kircher. Prodrom. Copt. p. 232. (i) Geograph. l. 17. p. 562. (k) Opera & Dies, l. 1. v. 208. (l) Apotelesm. l. 5. v. 176. (m) Iliad. 15. v. 238. Odyss 13. v. 87. (n) Sepher Shorash. rad. (o) Cateches. 9. s. 6. 26. The instinct by which some birds migrate to warmer climes before winter. Rapid flying peculiarly characterizes the whole hawk genus.39:1-30 God inquires of Job concerning several animals. - In these questions the Lord continued to humble Job. In this chapter several animals are spoken of, whose nature or situation particularly show the power, wisdom, and manifold works of God. The wild ass. It is better to labour and be good for something, than to ramble and be good for nothing. From the untameableness of this and other creatures, we may see, how unfit we are to give law to Providence, who cannot give law even to a wild ass's colt. The unicorn, a strong, stately, proud creature. He is able to serve, but not willing; and God challenges Job to force him to it. It is a great mercy if, where God gives strength for service, he gives a heart; it is what we should pray for, and reason ourselves into, which the brutes cannot do. Those gifts are not always the most valuable that make the finest show. Who would not rather have the voice of the nightingale, than the tail of the peacock; the eye of the eagle and her soaring wing, and the natural affection of the stork, than the beautiful feathers of the ostrich, which can never rise above the earth, and is without natural affection? The description of the war-horse helps to explain the character of presumptuous sinners. Every one turneth to his course, as the horse rushes into the battle. When a man's heart is fully set in him to do evil, and he is carried on in a wicked way, by the violence of his appetites and passions, there is no making him fear the wrath of God, and the fatal consequences of sin. Secure sinners think themselves as safe in their sins as the eagle in her nest on high, in the clefts of the rocks; but I will bring thee down from thence, saith the Lord, #Jer 49:16". All these beautiful references to the works of nature, should teach us a right view of the riches of the wisdom of Him who made and sustains all things. The want of right views concerning the wisdom of God, which is ever present in all things, led Job to think and speak unworthily of Providence.
Jump to Previous
Flieth Flight Fly Hawk Intelligence Soar South Spread Spreadeth Spreads Stretch Stretches Stretcheth Stretching Towards Understanding Wings Wisdom
Jump to Next
Flieth Flight Fly Hawk Intelligence Soar South Spread Spreadeth Spreads Stretch Stretches Stretcheth Stretching Towards Understanding Wings Wisdom
Links
Job 39:26 NIV
Job 39:26 NLT
Job 39:26 ESV
Job 39:26 NASB
Job 39:26 KJV

Job 39:26 Biblia Paralela
Job 39:26 Chinese Bible
Job 39:26 French Bible
Job 39:26 German Bible

Alphabetical: and by Does flight hawk his Is it soars south spread Stretching take that the toward understanding wings wisdom your

OT Poetry: Job 39:26 Is it by your wisdom that (Jb) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Job 39:25
Top of Page
Top of Page