Hebrews 12:1
New International Version
Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us,

New Living Translation
Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a huge crowd of witnesses to the life of faith, let us strip off every weight that slows us down, especially the sin that so easily trips us up. And let us run with endurance the race God has set before us.

English Standard Version
Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us,

Berean Study Bible
Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off every encumbrance and the sin that so easily entangles, and let us run with endurance the race set out for us.

Berean Literal Bible
Therefore we also, having such a great cloud of witnesses encompassing us, having laid aside every weight and the sin easily entangling, should run with endurance the race lying before us,

New American Standard Bible
Therefore, since we have so great a cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us also lay aside every encumbrance and the sin which so easily entangles us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us,

King James Bible
Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

Christian Standard Bible
Therefore, since we also have such a large cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us lay aside every hindrance and the sin that so easily ensnares us. Let us run with endurance the race that lies before us,

Contemporary English Version
Such a large crowd of witnesses is all around us! So we must get rid of everything that slows us down, especially the sin that just won't let go. And we must be determined to run the race that is ahead of us.

Good News Translation
As for us, we have this large crowd of witnesses around us. So then, let us rid ourselves of everything that gets in the way, and of the sin which holds on to us so tightly, and let us run with determination the race that lies before us.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Therefore, since we also have such a large cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us lay aside every weight and the sin that so easily ensnares us. Let us run with endurance the race that lies before us,

International Standard Version
Therefore, having so vast a cloud of witnesses surrounding us, and throwing off everything that hinders us and especially the sin that so easily entangles us, let us keep running with endurance the race set before us,

NET Bible
Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, we must get rid of every weight and the sin that clings so closely, and run with endurance the race set out for us,

New Heart English Bible
Therefore let us also, seeing we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, lay aside every weight and the sin which so easily entangles us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Therefore, we also, who have all of these witnesses who surround us like clouds, let us throw off from us all the weights of the sin which is always ready for us, and let us run with patience this race that is set for us.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Since we are surrounded by so many examples [of faith], we must get rid of everything that slows us down, especially sin that distracts us. We must run the race that lies ahead of us and never give up.

New American Standard 1977
Therefore, since we have so great a cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us also lay aside every encumbrance, and the sin which so easily entangles us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us,

Jubilee Bible 2000
Therefore, seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, leaving behind all the weight of the sin which surrounds us, let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

King James 2000 Bible
Therefore seeing we also are surrounded with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which does so easily ensnare us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

American King James Version
Why seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which does so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

American Standard Version
Therefore let us also, seeing we are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

Douay-Rheims Bible
And therefore we also having so great a cloud of witnesses over our head, laying aside every weight and sin which surrounds us, let us run by patience to the fight proposed to us:

Darby Bible Translation
Let us also therefore, having so great a cloud of witnesses surrounding us, laying aside every weight, and sin which so easily entangles us, run with endurance the race that lies before us,

English Revised Version
Therefore let us also, seeing we are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

Webster's Bible Translation
Wherefore, seeing we also are encompassed with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

Weymouth New Testament
Therefore, surrounded as we are by such a vast cloud of witnesses, let us fling aside every encumbrance and the sin that so readily entangles our feet. And let us run with patient endurance the race that lies before us,

World English Bible
Therefore let us also, seeing we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, lay aside every weight and the sin which so easily entangles us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

Young's Literal Translation
Therefore, we also having so great a cloud of witnesses set around us, every weight having put off, and the closely besetting sin, through endurance may we run the contest that is set before us,
Study Bible
The Call to Endurance
1Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off every encumbrance and the sin that so easily entangles, and let us run with endurance the race set out for us. 2Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before Him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.…
Cross References
Romans 13:12
The night is nearly over; the day has drawn near. So let us lay aside the deeds of darkness and put on the armor of light.

1 Corinthians 9:24
Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one receives the prize? Run in such a way as to take the prize.

1 Corinthians 9:26
Therefore I do not run aimlessly; I do not fight like I am beating the air.

Galatians 2:2
I went in response to a revelation and set before them the gospel that I preach among the Gentiles. But I spoke privately to those recognized as leaders, for fear that I was running or had already run in vain.

Ephesians 4:22
to put off your former way of life, your old self, which is being corrupted by its deceitful desires;

Ephesians 4:25
Therefore each of you must put off falsehood and speak truthfully to his neighbor, for we are members of one another.

Philippians 1:30
since you are encountering the same struggle you saw I had, and now hear that I still have.

Hebrews 10:36
You need to persevere, so that after you have done God's will, you will receive what He has promised.

1 Peter 5:1
As a fellow elder, a witness of Christ's sufferings, and a partaker of the glory to be revealed, I appeal to the elders among you:

Treasury of Scripture

Why seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which does so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

seeing.

Hebrews 11:2-38
For by it the elders obtained a good report…

a cloud.

Isaiah 60:8
Who are these that fly as a cloud, and as the doves to their windows?

Ezekiel 38:9,16
Thou shalt ascend and come like a storm, thou shalt be like a cloud to cover the land, thou, and all thy bands, and many people with thee…

witnesses.

Luke 16:28
For I have five brethren; that he may testify unto them, lest they also come into this place of torment.

John 3:32
And what he hath seen and heard, that he testifieth; and no man receiveth his testimony.

John 4:39,44
And many of the Samaritans of that city believed on him for the saying of the woman, which testified, He told me all that ever I did…

let us lay.

Matthew 10:37,38
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me…

Luke 8:14
And that which fell among thorns are they, which, when they have heard, go forth, and are choked with cares and riches and pleasures of this life, and bring no fruit to perfection.

Luke 9:59-62
And he said unto another, Follow me. But he said, Lord, suffer me first to go and bury my father…

and the sin.

Hebrews 10:35-39
Cast not away therefore your confidence, which hath great recompence of reward…

Psalm 18:23
I was also upright before him, and I kept myself from mine iniquity.

and let us.

1 Corinthians 9:24-27
Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain…

Galatians 5:7
Ye did run well; who did hinder you that ye should not obey the truth?

Philippians 2:16
Holding forth the word of life; that I may rejoice in the day of Christ, that I have not run in vain, neither laboured in vain.







Lexicon
Therefore,
Τοιγαροῦν (Toigaroun)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 5105: Consequently, therefore, well then, so then. From toi and gar and oun; truly for then, i.e. Consequently.

[since] we
ἡμεῖς (hēmeis)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Nominative 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

are
ἔχοντες (echontes)
Verb - Present Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 2192: To have, hold, possess. Including an alternate form scheo skheh'-o; a primary verb; to hold.

surrounded by
περικείμενον (perikeimenon)
Verb - Present Participle Middle or Passive - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 4029: From peri and keimai; to lie all around, i.e. Inclose, encircle, hamper.

such a great
τοσοῦτον (tosouton)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 5118: So great, so large, so long, so many. From tosos and houtos; so vast as this, i.e. Such.

cloud
νέφος (nephos)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 3509: A cloud; met: a dense crowd, a multitude, great company. Apparently a primary word; a cloud.

of witnesses,
μαρτύρων (martyrōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3144: A witness (judicially) or figuratively (genitive case); by analogy, a 'martyr'.

let us throw off
ἀποθέμενοι (apothemenoi)
Verb - Aorist Participle Middle - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 659: To lay off or aside, renounce, stow away, put. From apo and tithemi; to put away.

every
πάντα (panta)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3956: All, the whole, every kind of. Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.

encumbrance
ὄγκον (onkon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3591: (properly: bulk, mass, hence) a weight, burden, encumbrance. Probably from the same as agkale; a mass, i.e. Burden.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

the
τὴν (tēn)
Article - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

sin [that]
ἁμαρτίαν (hamartian)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 266: From hamartano; a sin.

so easily entangles,
εὐπερίστατον (euperistaton)
Adjective - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2139: From eu and a derivative of a presumed compound of peri and histemi; well standing around, i.e. thwarting in every direction.

[and] let us run
τρέχωμεν (trechōmen)
Verb - Present Subjunctive Active - 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 5143: Apparently a primary verb; which uses dremo drem'-o as alternate in certain tenses; to run or walk hastily.

with
δι’ (di’)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

endurance
ὑπομονῆς (hypomonēs)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 5281: Endurance, steadfastness, patient waiting for. From hupomeno; cheerful endurance, constancy.

the
τὸν (ton)
Article - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

race
ἀγῶνα (agōna)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 73: From ago; properly, a place of assembly, i.e. a contest; figuratively, an effort or anxiety.

set out for
προκείμενον (prokeimenon)
Verb - Present Participle Middle or Passive - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4295: From pro and keimai; to lie before the view, i.e. to be present, to stand forth.

us.
ἡμῖν (hēmin)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Dative 1st Person Plural
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.
(1) Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about.--Rather, Therefore let us also--since we are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses--having put away all encumbrance and the sin . . . run with patient endurance the race that is set before us, looking, &c. (In so difficult a verse as this we need an exactness of translation which might not otherwise be desirable.) It is plain that the chief thought is, "Let us run our race with patient endurance, looking unto Jesus the Author . . . of our faith;" so that here again we have the thought which the writer is never weary of enforcing, the need of faith and patience for all who would inherit the promises. The connection is chiefly with the last verses of Hebrews 11, which are, indeed, a summary of the whole chapter. The purpose of God has been that those who throughout the past ages obtained witness of Him through their faith should not reach their consummation apart from us. To that consummation, then, let us press forward. Present to us in the view of Christ's accomplished sacrifice, it is all future in regard of personal attainment. As those who have preceded us reached the goal, each one for himself, by faith and patient endurance, so must we. The thought of persevering effort crowned by a recompence of reward (Hebrews 6:12; Hebrews 6:18; Hebrews 10:35-39) very naturally suggested the imagery of the public games (by this time familiar even to Jews), to which St. Paul in his Epistles so frequently alludes. (See 1Corinthians 4:9; 1Corinthians 9:24-27; Philippians 3:12-14; 1Timothy 6:12; 2Timothy 4:7-8; comp. Hebrews 10:32-33.) In these passages are called up the various associations of the great national festivals of Greece--the severe discipline of the competitors, the intenseness of the struggle, the rewards, "the righteous judge," the crowd of spectators. Most of these thoughts are present here (Hebrews 12:1-2; Hebrews 12:4), and new joints of comparison are added, so that the scene is brought vividly before our eyes. It has been often supposed that the word "witnesses" is used in the sense of spectators of the race. To an English reader this idea is very natural (as "witnesses" may simply mean beholders), but there is no such ambiguity in the Greek word (martyres). The Greek fathers rightly understood it to signify those who bear witness, and the chief point of doubt seems to have been whether the sense is general, or whether the word bears its later meaning--martyrs, who have borne testimony with their blood. Those who thus encompass us, a countless "host (a "cloud" of witnesses), have had witness borne to them through their faith, and in turn stand forth as witnesses to faith, bearing testimony to its power and works. One and all 'they offer encouragement to us in our own contest of faith, and for this reason they are mentioned here. That the idea of the presence of spectators may be contained in the other words, "compassed about with so great a cloud," is very possible; but no interpretation must be allowed to interfere with the chief thought--that the runner's steadfast gaze is fixed on Him who has Himself traversed the course before us, and is now the Judge and Rewarder.

Every weight.--The Greek word was sometimes used by Greek writers to denote the excessive size and weight of body which the athlete sought to reduce by means of training; but may also signify the encumbrance of any burden, unnecessary clothing, and the like. It is here best taken in a general sense, as denoting anything that encumbers, and thus renders the athlete less fitted for the race. In the interpretation we might perhaps, think of the pressure of earthly cares, were it not that the writer seems to have in mind the special dangers of the Hebrew Christians. The "divers and strange teachings" spoken of in Hebrews 13:9, in which would be included the Judaising practices which they were tempted to observe (such as St. Peter described as a "yoke" too heavy to be borne), will probably suit the figure best.

And the sin which doth so easily beset us.--The last six words are the translation of a single adjective, which does not occur elsewhere. The Greek commentators, from whom we might expect some light cm. the phrase, seem to be entirely reduced to conjecture. Chrysostom, for example, adopts in various places two altogether different meanings, "sin which easily (or, completely) surrounds us," "sin which is easily overcome." To these Theophylact adds a third, "sin through which man is easily brought into danger." The prevailing opinion amongst modern writers appears to be that the word signifies well (or, easily) surrounding; and that the writer is comparing sin with a garment--either a loosely fitting garment by which the runner becomes entangled and tripped up, or one that clings closely to him and thus impedes his ease of movement. This view of the meaning is taken in our earlier English versions, which either follow the Latin (Wiclif, "that standeth about us;" Rhemish, "that compasseth us"), or render the words, the sin that hangeth on, or, that hangeth so fast on. The sense is excellent, but it is very doubtful whether the Greek will admit of such a rendering. Though the exact word is not found elsewhere, there are words closely allied as to the meaning of which there is no doubt Analogy clearly points to the signification much admired (literally, well surrounded by an admiring crowd). It is not impossible that even with this meaning the words "lay aside" or put away (often applied to putting off clothing) might still suggest a garment; if so, the allusion might be to a runner who refused to put off a garment which the crowd admired, though such an encumbrance must cause him to fail of the prize. It is more likely that the writer speaks of sin generally as an obstacle to the race, which must be put aside if the runner is to contend at all. If we look at the later exhortations of the Epistle, we shall find repeated mention of the reproach which the followers of Christ must bear. Even in the history of Moses (Hebrews 11:26) there are words which suggest the thought. (See also Hebrews 10:33; Hebrews 13:13). So in the next verse we read of the cross of Jesus and the shame which He despised. Over against this "reproach" is set the sin which is sure to win man's favour and applause--the sin of which we have read in Hebrews 10:26 (comp. Hebrews 11:25), which, seemingly harmless in its first approaches, will end in a "falling away from the living God." The rendering with which the Authorised version has made us familiar is full of interest, but cannot (at all events as it is commonly understood) be an expression of the sense intended. Whatever view be taken of the one peculiar word, it does not seem possible that the phrase can point to what is known as a "besetting sin," the sin which in the case of any one of us is proved to possess especial power.

12:1-11 The persevering obedience of faith in Christ, was the race set before the Hebrews, wherein they must either win the crown of glory, or have everlasting misery for their portion; and it is set before us. By the sin that does so easily beset us, understand that sin to which we are most prone, or to which we are most exposed, from habit, age, or circumstances. This is a most important exhortation; for while a man's darling sin, be it what it will, remains unsubdued, it will hinder him from running the Christian race, as it takes from him every motive for running, and gives power to every discouragement. When weary and faint in their minds, let them recollect that the holy Jesus suffered, to save them from eternal misery. By stedfastly looking to Jesus, their thoughts would strengthen holy affections, and keep under their carnal desires. Let us then frequently consider him. What are our little trials to his agonies, or even to our deserts? What are they to the sufferings of many others? There is a proneness in believers to grow weary, and to faint under trials and afflictions; this is from the imperfection of grace and the remains of corruption. Christians should not faint under their trials. Though their enemies and persecutors may be instruments to inflict sufferings, yet they are Divine chastisements; their heavenly Father has his hand in all, and his wise end to answer by all. They must not make light of afflictions, and be without feeling under them, for they are the hand and rod of God, and are his rebukes for sin. They must not despond and sink under trials, nor fret and repine, but bear up with faith and patience. God may let others alone in their sins, but he will correct sin in his own children. In this he acts as becomes a father. Our earthly parents sometimes may chasten us, to gratify their passion, rather than to reform our manners. But the Father of our souls never willingly grieves nor afflicts his children. It is always for our profit. Our whole life here is a state of childhood, and imperfect as to spiritual things; therefore we must submit to the discipline of such a state. When we come to a perfect state, we shall be fully reconciled to all God's chastisement of us now. God's correction is not condemnation; the chastening may be borne with patience, and greatly promote holiness. Let us then learn to consider the afflictions brought on us by the malice of men, as corrections sent by our wise and gracious Father, for our spiritual good.
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Alphabetical: a also and are aside before by cloud easily encumbrance endurance entangles every everything for great have hinders is lay let marked of off out perseverance race run set sin since so such surrounded surrounding that the Therefore throw us we which with witnesses

NT Letters: Hebrews 12:1 Therefore let us also seeing we (Heb. He. Hb) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Hebrews 11:40
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