Acts 20:1
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
When the uproar had ended, Paul sent for the disciples and, after encouraging them, said goodbye and set out for Macedonia.

New Living Translation
When the uproar was over, Paul sent for the believers and encouraged them. Then he said good-bye and left for Macedonia.

English Standard Version
After the uproar ceased, Paul sent for the disciples, and after encouraging them, he said farewell and departed for Macedonia.

Berean Study Bible
When the uproar had ended, Paul sent for the disciples. After he had encouraged them, he said goodbye to them and left for Macedonia.

Berean Literal Bible
Now after the uproar had ceased, Paul, having summoned the disciples and having encouraged them and having said farewell, departed to go to Macedonia.

New American Standard Bible
After the uproar had ceased, Paul sent for the disciples, and when he had exhorted them and taken his leave of them, he left to go to Macedonia.

King James Bible
And after the uproar was ceased, Paul called unto him the disciples, and embraced them, and departed for to go into Macedonia.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
After the uproar was over, Paul sent for the disciples, encouraged them, and after saying good-bye, departed to go to Macedonia.

International Standard Version
When the uproar was over, Paul sent for the disciples and encouraged them. Then he said goodbye to them and left to go to Macedonia.

NET Bible
After the disturbance had ended, Paul sent for the disciples, and after encouraging them and saying farewell, he left to go to Macedonia.

New Heart English Bible
After the uproar had ceased, Paul sent for the disciples and, after encouraging them, took leave of them, and departed to go into Macedonia.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And after the uproar had ceased, Paulus called the disciples and comforted them and kissed them, and he departed and went to Macedonia.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When the uproar was over, Paul sent for the disciples, encouraged them, said goodbye, and left for Macedonia.

New American Standard 1977
And after the uproar had ceased, Paul sent for the disciples and when he had exhorted them and taken his leave of them, he departed to go to Macedonia.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And after the uproar was ceased, Paul called the disciples and embraced them and departed to go into Macedonia.

King James 2000 Bible
And after the uproar was ceased, Paul called unto him the disciples, and embraced them, and departed to go into Macedonia.

American King James Version
And after the uproar was ceased, Paul called to him the disciples, and embraced them, and departed for to go into Macedonia.

American Standard Version
And after the uproar ceased, Paul having sent for the disciples and exhorted them, took leave of them, and departed to go into Macedonia.

Douay-Rheims Bible
AND after the tumult was ceased, Paul calling to him the disciples, and exhorting them, took his leave, and set forward to go into Macedonia.

Darby Bible Translation
But after the tumult had ceased, Paul having called the disciples to [him] and embraced [them], went away to go to Macedonia.

English Revised Version
And after the uproar was ceased, Paul having sent for the disciples and exhorted them, took leave of them, and departed for to go into Macedonia.

Webster's Bible Translation
And after the uproar had ceased, Paul called to him the disciples, and embraced them, and departed to go into Macedonia.

Weymouth New Testament
When the uproar had ceased, Paul sent for the disciples; and, after speaking words of encouragement to them, he took his leave, and started for Macedonia.

World English Bible
After the uproar had ceased, Paul sent for the disciples, took leave of them, and departed to go into Macedonia.

Young's Literal Translation
And after the ceasing of the tumult, Paul having called near the disciples, and having embraced them, went forth to go on to Macedonia;
Study Bible
Paul in Macedonia and Greece
1When the uproar had ended, Paul sent for the disciples. After he had encouraged them, he said goodbye to them and left for Macedonia. 2After traveling through that area and speaking many words of encouragement, he arrived in Greece,…
Cross References
Acts 11:26
and when he found him, he brought him back to Antioch. So for a full year they met together with the church and taught large numbers of people. The disciples were first called Christians at Antioch.

Acts 16:9
During the night, Paul had a vision of a man of Macedonia standing and pleading with him, "Come over to Macedonia and help us."

Acts 16:12
From there, we went to the Roman colony of Philippi, the leading city of that district of Macedonia. And we stayed there several days.

Acts 19:21
After these things had happened, Paul purposed in spirit to go to Jerusalem after he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia. "After I have been there," he said, "I must see Rome as well."

Acts 19:41
After he had said this, he dismissed the assembly.

Acts 20:2
After traveling through that area and speaking many words of encouragement, he arrived in Greece,

Acts 20:3
where he stayed three months. And when the Jews formed a plot against him as he was about to sail for Syria, he decided to go back through Macedonia.

Romans 15:19
by the power of signs and wonders, and by the power of the Spirit of God. So from Jerusalem all the way around to Illyricum, I have fully proclaimed the gospel of Christ.
Treasury of Scripture

And after the uproar was ceased, Paul called to him the disciples, and embraced them, and departed for to go into Macedonia.

after.

Acts 19:23-41 And the same time there arose no small stir about that way…

embraced.

Acts 20:10,37 And Paul went down, and fell on him, and embracing him said, Trouble …

Acts 21:5,6 And when we had accomplished those days, we departed and went our …

Genesis 48:10 Now the eyes of Israel were dim for age, so that he could not see. …

1 Samuel 20:41,42 And as soon as the lad was gone, David arose out of a place toward …

Romans 16:16 Salute one another with an holy kiss. The churches of Christ salute you.

1 Corinthians 16:20 All the brothers greet you. Greet you one another with an holy kiss.

2 Corinthians 13:12 Greet one another with an holy kiss.

1 Thessalonians 5:26 Greet all the brothers with an holy kiss.

to go.

Acts 19:21 After these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when …

1 Corinthians 16:5 Now I will come to you, when I shall pass through Macedonia: for …

2 Corinthians 7:5 For, when we were come into Macedonia, our flesh had no rest, but …

1 Timothy 1:3 As I sought you to abide still at Ephesus, when I went into Macedonia, …

XX.

(1) Paul called unto him the disciples, and embraced them . . .--The latter verb implies a farewell salutation.

Departed for to go into Macedonia.--We are able from the Epistles to the Corinthians to fill up the gap left in the narrative of the Acts. Having sent Timotheus and Erastus to see after the discipline of the Church of Corinth (Acts 19:17), the Apostle was cheered by the coming of Stephanas and his two companions (1Corinthians 16:17), and apparently wrote by them what is now the First Epistle to the Corinthians. A previous Epistle had been sent, probably by Timothy, to which he refers in 1Corinthians 4:17. When he wrote that Epistle he intended to press on quickly and complete in person the work which it was to begin (1Corinthians 4:18-19). He was led, however, to change his purpose, and to take the land journey through Macedonia instead of going by sea to Corinth (2Corinthians 1:16-17), and so from Corinth to Macedonia, as he had at first intended. He was anxious to know the effect of his letter before he took any further action, and Titus, who probably accompanied the bearers of that letter, was charged to hasten back to Troas with his report. On coming to Troas, however, he did not find him, and after waiting for some time in vain (2Corinthians 2:12), the anxiety told upon his health. He despaired of life and felt as if the sentence of death was passed on him (2Corinthians 1:8; 2Corinthians 4:10-11). The mysterious thorn in the flesh "buffeted" him with more severity than ever (2Corinthians 12:7). He pressed on, however, to Macedonia (2Corinthians 2:13), probably to Philippi, as being the first of the churches he had planted, where he would find loving friends and the "beloved physician," whose services he now needed more than ever. There, or elsewhere in Macedonia, Titus joined him, and brought tidings that partly cheered him, partly roused his indignation. There had been repentance and reformation where he most wished to see them, on the one hand (2Corinthians 6:6-12); on the other, his enemies said bitter things of him, sneered at his bodily infirmities (2Corinthians 10:10), and compared, to his disparagement, the credentials which Apollos had presented (2Corinthians 3:1) with his lack of them. The result was that Titus was sent back with the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, accompanied by some other disciple (probably St. Luke, but see Notes on 2Corinthians 8:18-19), the Apostle resolving to wait till they had brought matters into better order and had collected what had been laid up in store for the Church of Jerusalem, so that it might be ready for him on his arrival (2Corinthians 9:5). At or about this time also, to judge from the numerous parallelisms of thought and language between it and the Epistles to the Corinthians on the one hand, and that to the Romans on the other, we must place the date of the Epistle to the Galatians. (See Introduction to that Epistle.) Probably after Titus and Luke had left, and before Timotheus had returned--when he was alone, with no one to share the labour of writing, or to give help and counsel--tidings came that the Judaising teachers had been there also, and had been only too successful. How the tidings reached him we do not know, but if the purple-seller of Thyatira was still at Philippi, she might naturally be in receipt of communications from that city, and it was near enough to Galatia to know what was passing there.

Verse 1. - Having sent for... and exhorted for called unto him, A.V. and T.R.; took leave of them, and departed for and embraced them, and departed, A.V. Departed for to go into Macedonia. This was St. Paul's purpose, as he had written to the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:5) from Ephesus. He judged it wise, not only with a view to his own safety and that of his companions, but also for the rest and quiet of the Ephesian Church, to take advantage of the lull in the popular storm, and withdraw into quiet waters before any fresh outbreak occurred. Aquila and Priscilla seem to have left Ephesus about the same time, or soon after, since the Epistle to the Romans found them again at Rome (Romans 16:3, 4); and, if the view mentioned in the note to Acts 19:40 is true - that in the riot they had saved St. Paul's life at the risk of their own - there were probably the same prudential motives for their leaving Ephesus as there were in the case of the apostle. And after the uproar was ceased,.... Which Demetrius, and the craftsmen, had raised at Ephesus, and which was put an end to by the speech of the town clerk, or register keeper of the theatre:

Paul called unto him the disciples; the members of the church at Ephesus, whom he convened, either at his own lodgings, or at their usual place of meeting:

and embraced them; or "saluted them"; that is, with a kiss, which was sometimes done at parting, as well as at meeting; see Acts 20:37 and so the Syriac version renders it, and "kissed" them, and so took his leave of them, and bid them farewell; the Alexandrian copy, and some other copies, and the Syriac and Vulgate Latin versions before this clause insert, "and exhorted, or comforted" them; that is, exhorted them to continue steadfast in the faith, and hold fast the profession of it without wavering, and comforted them under all their tribulations, and in a view of what afflictions and persecutions they must expect to endure for the sake of Christ, with the exceeding great and precious promises of the Gospel:

and departed to go into Macedonia; to visit the churches at Philippi, Thessalonica, and Berea, and to establish them in the faith of the Gospel: he did not choose to leave Ephesus till the tumult was over, partly on his own account, that he might not bring upon himself an imputation of fear and cowardice; and partly on the account of the church at Ephesus, that he might not leave them in distress, and add to it; but now it was over, he judged it proper to take his leave of them, and visit other churches, the care of which equally lay upon him. CHAPTER 20

Ac 20:1-12. Paul Fulfils His Purpose of Proceeding Again to Macedonia and Greece—Returning Thence, on His Route for Jerusalem, He Revisits Philippi and Troas—His Ministrations at Troas.

This section of the apostle's life, though peculiarly rich in material, is related with great brevity in the History. Its details must be culled from his own Epistles.

1, 2. departed—after Pentecost (1Co 16:8).

to go into Macedonia—in pursuance of the first part of his plan (Ac 19:21). From his Epistles we learn; (1) That, as might have been expected from its position on the coast, he revisited Troas (2Co 2:12; see on [2064]Ac 16:8). (2) That while on his former visit he appears to have done no missionary work there, he now went expressly "to preach Christ's Gospel," and found "a door opened unto him of the Lord" there, which he entered so effectually as to lay the foundation of a church there (Ac 20:6, 7). (3) That he would have remained longer there but for his uneasiness at the non-arrival of Titus, whom he had despatched to Corinth to finish the collection for the poor saints at Jerusalem (1Co 16:1, 2; 2Co 8:6), but still more, that he might bring him word what effect his first Epistle to that church had produced. (He had probably arranged that they should meet at Troas). (4) That in this state of mind, afraid of something wrong, he "took leave" of the brethren at Troas, and went from thence into Macedonia.

It was, no doubt, the city of Philippi that he came to (landing at Nicopolis, its seaport, see on [2065]Ac 16:11, 12), as appears by comparing 2Co 11:9, where "Macedonia" is named, with Php 4:15, where it appears that Philippi is meant. Here he found the brethren, whom he had left on his former visit in circumstances of such deep interest, a consolidated and thriving church, generous and warmly attached to their father in Christ; under the superintendence, probably, of our historian, "the beloved physician" (see on [2066]Ac 16:40). All that is said by our historian of this Macedonian visit is that "he went over those parts and gave them much exhortation." (5) Titus not having reached Philippi as soon as the apostle, "his flesh had no rest, but he was troubled on every side: without were fightings, within were fears" (2Co 7:5). (6) At length Titus arrived, to the joy of the apostle, the bearer of better tidings from Corinth than he had dared to expect (2Co 7:6, 7, 13), but checkered by painful intelligence of the efforts of a hostile party to undermine his apostolic reputation there (2Co 10:1-18). (7) Under the mixed feelings which this produced, he wrote—from Macedonia, and probably Philippi—his Second Epistle to the Corinthians (see [2067]Introduction to Second Corinthians); despatching Titus with it, and along with him two other unnamed deputies, expressly chosen to take up and bring their collection for the poor saints at Jerusalem, and to whom he bears the beautiful testimony, that they were "the glory of Christ" (2Co 8:22, 23). (8) It must have been at this time that he penetrated as far as to the confines of "Illyricum," lying along the shores of the Adriatic (Ro 15:19). He would naturally wish that his second Letter to the Corinthians should have some time to produce its proper effect ere he revisited them, and this would appear a convenient opportunity for a northwestern circuit, which would enable him to pay a passing visit to the churches at Thessalonica and Berea, though of this we have no record. On his way southward to Greece, he would preach the Gospel in the intermediate regions of Epirus, Thessaly, and Boeotia (see Ro 15:19), though of this we have no record.20:1-6 Tumults or opposition may constrain a Christian to remove from his station or alter his purpose, but his work and his pleasure will be the same, wherever he goes. Paul thought it worth while to bestow five days in going to Troas, though it was but for seven days' stay there; but he knew, and so should we, how to redeem even journeying time, and to make it turn to some good account.
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