Acts 16:40
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New International Version
After Paul and Silas came out of the prison, they went to Lydia's house, where they met with the brothers and sisters and encouraged them. Then they left.

New Living Translation
When Paul and Silas left the prison, they returned to the home of Lydia. There they met with the believers and encouraged them once more. Then they left town.

English Standard Version
So they went out of the prison and visited Lydia. And when they had seen the brothers, they encouraged them and departed.

Berean Study Bible
After Paul and Silas came out of the prison, they went to Lydia's house to see the brothers and encourage them. Then they left the city.

Berean Literal Bible
And having gone forth out of the prison, they came to Lydia, and having seen them, they exhorted the brothers and departed.

New American Standard Bible
They went out of the prison and entered the house of Lydia, and when they saw the brethren, they encouraged them and departed.

King James Bible
And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia: and when they had seen the brethren, they comforted them, and departed.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
After leaving the jail, they came to Lydia's house where they saw and encouraged the brothers, and departed.

International Standard Version
Leaving the jail, Paul and Silas went to Lydia's house. They saw the brothers, encouraged them, and then left.

NET Bible
When they came out of the prison, they entered Lydia's house, and when they saw the brothers, they encouraged them and then departed.

New Heart English Bible
They went out of the prison, and entered into Lydia's house. When they had seen the brothers, they encouraged them, and departed.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And when they went out from the prison they returned to Lydia, and there they saw the brethren and comforted them, and they left.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
After Paul and Silas left the jail, they went to Lydia's house. They met with the believers, encouraged them, and then left.

New American Standard 1977
And they went out of the prison and entered the house of Lydia, and when they saw the brethren, they encouraged them and departed.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And leaving the prison, they entered into the house of Lydia; and when they had seen the brethren, they comforted them and departed.

King James 2000 Bible
And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia: and when they had seen the brethren, they comforted them, and departed.

American King James Version
And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia: and when they had seen the brothers, they comforted them, and departed.

American Standard Version
And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia: and when they had seen the brethren, they comforted them, and departed.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia; and having seen the brethren, they comforted them, and departed.

Darby Bible Translation
And having gone out of the prison, they came to Lydia; and having seen the brethren, they exhorted them and went away.

English Revised Version
And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia: and when they had seen the brethren, they comforted them, and departed.

Webster's Bible Translation
And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia: and when they had seen the brethren, they comforted them, and departed.

Weymouth New Testament
Then Paul and Silas, having come out of the prison, went to Lydia's house; and, after seeing the brethren and encouraging them, they left Philippi.

World English Bible
They went out of the prison, and entered into Lydia's house. When they had seen the brothers, they encouraged them, and departed.

Young's Literal Translation
and they, having gone forth out of the prison, entered into the house of Lydia, and having seen the brethren, they comforted them, and went forth.
Study Bible
An Official Apology
39They came to appease them and led them out, requesting that they leave the city. 40After Paul and Silas came out of the prison, they went to Lydia’s house to see the brothers and encourage them. Then they left the city.
Cross References
Acts 1:15
In those days Peter stood up among the brothers (a gathering of about a hundred and twenty) and said,

Acts 16:2
The brothers in Lystra and Iconium spoke well of him.

Acts 16:14
Among those listening was a woman named Lydia, a dealer in purple cloth from the city of Thyatira, who was a worshiper of God. The Lord opened her heart to respond to Paul's message.
Treasury of Scripture

And they went out of the prison, and entered into the house of Lydia: and when they had seen the brothers, they comforted them, and departed.

and entered.

Acts 16:14 And a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, of the city …

Acts 4:23 And being let go, they went to their own company, and reported all …

Acts 12:12-17 And when he had considered the thing, he came to the house of Mary …

they comforted.

Acts 14:22 Confirming the souls of the disciples, and exhorting them to continue …

2 Corinthians 1:3-7 Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father …

2 Corinthians 4:8-12,16-18 We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, …

1 Thessalonians 3:2,3 And sent Timotheus, our brother, and minister of God, and our fellow …

(40) They comforted them, and departed.--Lydia's house appears to have been the meeting-place of the brethren, as well as the lodging of the Apostle and his party. As the third person is now resumed, we may infer that St. Luke remained at Philippi, Timothy accompanying the other two. It would seem from Acts 20:2 that the Evangelist made Philippi the centre of his evangelising work for many years. Under the care of the beloved physician, the good work went on, and we may probably trace to his influence, and to Lydia's kindness, the generous help which was sent to St. Paul once and again when he was at Thessalonica (Philippians 4:15-16), and, probably, at Corinth also (2Corinthians 11:9). Long years afterwards he cherished a grateful memory of the men and women who had laboured with him at Philippi. Among these we may think of the Clement, of whom he thus speaks, possibly identical with the Flavius Clemens, who occupies a prominent position among the apostolic fathers, and was traditionally the third Bishop of Rome. (See, however, Note on Philippians 4:3.)

Verse 40. - Departed; i.e. from Philippi, according to the magistrates' request in ver. 39. This is much clearer in the T.R. and A.V. than in the Revised Text and Version, because the same word, ἐξελθεῖν, is used in both places. The R.T. in ver. 39 - ἀπελθεῖν ἀπὸ destroys the reference, and rather suggests that they merely" went out "of Lydia's house, which they had "entered into." It appears from the first verse of Acts 17. ("they had passed," etc.) that St. Luke stopped at Philippi, and probably made it his head-quarters till St. Paul's last journey from Macedonia to Jerusalem, some six or seven years later (Acts 20:6). What became of Timothy we are not expressly told, only we find him at Beroea in Acts 17:14 and 1 Thessalonians 3:5; and at Corinth (1 Thessalonians 1:1; 2 Thessalonians 1:1; 1 Thessalonians 3:6). Probably he accompanied St. Paul, but is not named, being still only a subordinate person in the mission.



And they went out of the prison,.... In a public manner, with great honour and reputation, at the request of the magistrates that put them there:

and entered into the house of Lydia; whom Paul had baptized, Acts 16:14. The word "house" is rightly supplied, for the sense is not, that they went into the country of Lydia, as some have been tempted to think; but they went to the woman Lydia, whose heart the Lord had opened, and was become a disciple and follower of Christ; they went to her house it being in the city of Philippi, where she now abode,

and when they had seen the brethren: the men of Lydia's house, her servants, who were converted, and had been baptized with her, and are therefore called brethren; and whomsoever else they might have been instrumental in the conversion of, who might meet them in Lydia's house: in Beza's above mentioned copy, it is here added, "they declared what the Lord had done for them"; they related the earthquake and the effects of it, and how they had been useful for the conversion of the jailer and his family, who had been baptized by them, and by what means they were released from prison; all which they ascribe to the Lord, who has all power, and the hearts of all in his hands: and thus,

they comforted them; with what God had done for them, or exhorted them: to cleave to the Lord, to continue in the faith, and abide by the truths and ordinances of the Gospel:

and departed; that is, out of the city of Philippi; this is wanting in the Syriac and Arabic versions here, but is placed in the beginning of the next chapter: and now these two families, Lydia's and the jailer's, laid the foundation of a Gospel church in this city of Philippi, and which continued for ages after; Erastus, of whom mention is made in Acts 19:22 is said to be bishop of this church, and it may be also Epaphroditus, for there were more bishops than one in this church in the apostle's time, Philippians 1:1, in the "second" century there was a church, to which Ignatius and Polycarp are said to send epistles; and there are epistles to the Philippians which go under their names, that are still extant: in the "third" century, Tertullian (o), among other churches, makes mention of the church at Philippi, as sound in the faith; and in the "fourth" and "fifth" centuries we read of a church in this place; in the "seventh" century, when it went by the name of Chrysopolis, there was a church in it, and a bishop of it, who was present at the sixth council in Constantinople; there were Christians dwelling here in the "ninth" century (p).

(o) De praescript. Heret. c. 36. (p) Magdeburg. Hist. Eccles. cent. 4. c. 2. p. 6. & cent. 5. c. 2. p. 6. cent. 7. c. 2. p. 3, 5. cent. 9. c. 2. p. 4. 40. And they went out of the prison—Having attained their object—to vindicate their civil rights, by the infraction of which in this case the Gospel in their persons had been illegally affronted—they had no mind to carry the matter farther. Their citizenship was valuable to them only as a shield against unnecessary injuries to their Master's cause. What a beautiful mixture of dignity and meekness is this! Nothing secular, which may be turned to the account of the Gospel, is morbidly disregarded; in any other view, nothing of this nature is set store by:—an example this for all ages.

and entered into the house of Lydia—as if to show by this leisurely proceeding that they had not been made to leave, but were at full liberty to consult their own convenience.

and when they had seen the brethren—not only her family and the jailer's, but probably others now gained to the Gospel.

they comforted them—rather, perhaps, "exhorted" them, which would include comfort. "This assembly of believers in the house of Lydia was the first church that had been founded in Europe" [Baumgarten].

and departed—but not all; for two of the company remained behind (see on [2038]Ac 17:14): Timotheus, of whom the Philippians "learned the proof" that he honestly cared for their state, and was truly like-minded with Paul, "serving with him in the Gospel as a son with his father" (Php 2:19-23); and Luke, "whose praise is in the Gospel," though he never praises himself or relates his own labors, and though we only trace his movements in connection with Paul, by the change of a pronoun, or the unconscious variation of his style. In the seventeenth chapter the narrative is again in the third person, and the pronoun is not changed to the second till we come to Ac 20:5. The modesty with which Luke leaves out all mention of his own labors need hardly be pointed out. We shall trace him again when he rejoins Paul in the same neighborhood. His vocation as a physician may have brought him into connection with these contiguous coasts of Asia and Europe, and he may (as Mr. Smith suggests, "Shipwreck," etc.) have been in the habit of exercising his professional skill as a surgeon at sea [Howson].

Ac 15:41-16:5. Visitation of the Churches Formerly Established, Timotheus Here Joining the Missionary Party.

41. he went through Syria and Cilicia—(See on [2030]Ac 15:23). Taking probably the same route as when despatched in haste from Jerusalem to Tarsus, he then went by land (see on [2031]Ac 9:30).16:35-40 Paul, though willing to suffer for the cause of Christ, and without any desire to avenge himself, did not choose to depart under the charge of having deserved wrongful punishment, and therefore required to be dismissed in an honourable manner. It was not a mere point of honour that the apostle stood upon, but justice, and not to himself so much as to his cause. And when proper apology is made, Christians should never express personal anger, nor insist too strictly upon personal amends. The Lord will make them more than conquerors in every conflict; instead of being cast down by their sufferings, they will become comforters of their brethren.
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Alphabetical: After and brethren brothers came departed encouraged entered house left Lydia Lydia's met of out Paul prison saw Silas the them Then they to went when where with

NT Apostles: Acts 16:40 They went out of the prison (Acts of the Apostles Ac) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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