2 John 1:12
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
I have much to write to you, but I do not want to use paper and ink. Instead, I hope to visit you and talk with you face to face, so that our joy may be complete.

New Living Translation
I have much more to say to you, but I don't want to do it with paper and ink. For I hope to visit you soon and talk with you face to face. Then our joy will be complete.

English Standard Version
Though I have much to write to you, I would rather not use paper and ink. Instead I hope to come to you and talk face to face, so that our joy may be complete.

Berean Study Bible
I have many things to write you, but I would prefer not to use paper and ink. Instead, I hope to come and speak with you face to face, so that our joy may be complete.

Berean Literal Bible
Having many things to write to you, I purposed not with paper and ink, but I hope to come to you and to speak mouth to mouth, so that our joy may be having been completed.

New American Standard Bible
Though I have many things to write to you, I do not want to do so with paper and ink; but I hope to come to you and speak face to face, so that your joy may be made full.

King James Bible
Having many things to write unto you, I would not write with paper and ink: but I trust to come unto you, and speak face to face, that our joy may be full.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Though I have many things to write to you, I don't want to do so with paper and ink. Instead, I hope to be with you and talk face to face so that our joy may be complete.

International Standard Version
Although I have a great deal to write to you, I would prefer not to use paper and ink. Instead, I hope to come to you and talk face to face, so that our joy may be complete.

NET Bible
Though I have many other things to write to you, I do not want to do so with paper and ink, but I hope to come visit you and speak face to face, so that our joy may be complete.

New Heart English Bible
Having many things to write to you, I do not want to do so with paper and ink, but I hope to come to you, and to speak face to face, that our joy may be made full.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
As I had much to write to you, I did not want to speak with parchment and ink, but I hope to come to you and we shall speak face-to-face, that our joy may be complete.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
I have a lot to write to you. I would prefer not to write a letter. Instead, I hope to visit and talk things over with you personally. Then we will be completely filled with joy.

New American Standard 1977
Having many things to write to you, I do not want to do so with paper and ink; but I hope to come to you and speak face to face, that your joy may be made full.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Having many things to write unto you, I would not write with paper and ink, but I trust to come unto you and speak face to face, that our joy may be full.

King James 2000 Bible
Having many things to write unto you, I would not write with paper and ink: but I trust to come unto you, and speak face to face, that our joy may be full.

American King James Version
Having many things to write to you, I would not write with paper and ink: but I trust to come to you, and speak face to face, that our joy may be full.

American Standard Version
Having many things to write unto you, I would not write them with paper and ink: but I hope to come unto you, and to speak face to face, that your joy may be made full.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Having more things to write unto you, I would not by paper and ink: for I hope that I shall be with you, and speak face to face: that your joy may be full.

Darby Bible Translation
Having many things to write to you, I would not with paper and ink; but hope to come to you, and to speak mouth to mouth, that our joy may be full.

English Revised Version
Having many things to write unto you, I would not write them with paper and ink: but I hope to come unto you, and to speak face to face, that your joy may be fulfilled.

Webster's Bible Translation
Having many things to write to you, I would not write with paper and ink: but I trust to come to you, and speak face to face, that our joy may be full.

Weymouth New Testament
I have a great deal to say to you all, but will not write it with paper and ink. Yet I hope to come to see you and speak face to face, so that your happiness may be complete.

World English Bible
Having many things to write to you, I don't want to do so with paper and ink, but I hope to come to you, and to speak face to face, that our joy may be made full.

Young's Literal Translation
Many things having to write to you, I did not intend through paper and ink, but I hope to come unto you, and speak mouth to mouth, that our joy may be full;
Study Bible
Final Greetings
11Whoever greets such a person shares in his evil deeds. 12I have many things to write you, but I would prefer not to use paper and ink. Instead, I hope to come and speak with you face to face, so that our joy may be complete. 13The children of your elect sister send you greetings.…
Cross References
John 3:29
The bride belongs to the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom stands by and listens for him, and is overjoyed to hear the bridegroom's voice. That joy is mine, and it is now complete.

1 John 1:4
We write these things so that our joy may be complete.

3 John 1:10
So if I come, I will call attention to his malicious slander against us. And unsatisfied with that, he refuses to welcome the brothers and forbids those who want to do so, even putting them out of the church.

3 John 1:13
I have many things to write you, but I would prefer not to do so with pen and ink.

3 John 1:14
Instead, I hope to see you soon and speak face to face. Peace to you. The friends here send you greetings. Greet each of our friends there by name.
Treasury of Scripture

Having many things to write to you, I would not write with paper and ink: but I trust to come to you, and speak face to face, that our joy may be full.

many.

John 16:12 I have yet many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now.

I would.

3 John 1:13 I had many things to write, but I will not with ink and pen write to you:

I trust.

Romans 15:24 Whenever I take my journey into Spain, I will come to you: for I …

1 Corinthians 16:5-7 Now I will come to you, when I shall pass through Macedonia: for …

Philemon 1:22 But with prepare me also a lodging: for I trust that through your …

Hebrews 13:19,23 But I beseech you the rather to do this, that I may be restored to …

face to face. Gr. mouth to mouth.

Numbers 12:8 With him will I speak mouth to mouth, even apparently, and not in …

that.

John 15:11 These things have I spoken to you, that my joy might remain in you, …

John 16:24 Till now have you asked nothing in my name: ask, and you shall receive, …

John 17:13 And now come I to you; and these things I speak in the world, that …

2 Timothy 1:4 Greatly desiring to see you, being mindful of your tears, that I …

1 John 1:4 And these things write we to you, that your joy may be full.

our. or, your.

(3) Conclusion (2John 1:12-13).

(12) Having many things to write unto you.--This verse shows that the Letter to the matron and her family was not a mere accompaniment of a copy of the First Epistle. His heart is full of things to write, but he hopes soon to have unlimited conversation.

Paper.--The Egyptian papyrus.

Ink.--A mixture of soot, water, and gum. The papyrus-tree grows in the swamps of the Nile to the height of ten feet and more. Paper was prepared from the thin coats that surround the plant. Pliny describes the method (xiii. 23). The different pieces were joined together by the turbid Nile water, as it has a kind of glutinous property. One layer of papyrus was laid flat on a board, and a cross layer put over it; these were pressed, and afterwards dried in the sun. The sheets were then fastened or pasted together. There were never more than twenty of these sheets fastened together in a roll; but of course the length could be increased to any extent. The writing was in columns, with a blank slip between them; it was only on one side. When the work was finished, it was rolled on a staff, and sometimes wrapped in a parchment case (Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, p. 567).

Of the ink used by the Romans, Pliny says that it was made of soot in various ways, with burnt resin or pitch. "For this purpose they have built furnaces which do not allow the smoke to escape. The kind most commended is made in this way from pine-wood: it is mixed with soot from the furnaces or baths; and this they use for writing on rolls. Some also make a kind of ink by boiling and straining the lees of wine." The black matter of the cuttle-fish was also sometimes used for writing (Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, p. 110).

The pen was a reed, sharpened with a knife, and split like a quill-pen.

The Jews seem to have used lamp-black dissolved in gall-juice, or lamp-black and vitriol, for ink. The modern scribes "have an apparatus consisting of a metal or ebony tube for their reed-pens, with a cup or bulb of the same material attached to the upper end for ink. This they thrust through the girdle, and carry with them at all times" (Thomson, The Land and the Book, p. 131; Smith's Dictionary of the Bible, p. 1802).

Speak face to face.--Not that there was any oral tradition which he would not write down. His Gospel and First Epistle would contain the outline of all his teaching. But on this occasion there was no need for writing. (Comp. 1Corinthians 13:12.)

That our joy may be full.--Comp. 1John 1:4. It would be the deep satisfaction of the interchange of spiritual thoughts and aspirations without the limitations of a monologue or of writing materials.

(13) The children of thy elect sister.--He may have been staying at this second matron's house; at any rate, the family knew he was writing. The simplicity of the great Apostle, the personal friend of the risen Lord, the last of the great pillars of the Church of Christ--in transmitting this familiar message, makes a most instructive finish to what is throughout a beautiful picture.

Verses 12, 13. - 3. THE CONCLUSION OF THE EPISTLE. It is in their openings and conclusions, and especially in the latter, that the Second and Third Epistles have so strong a resemblance that we are almost compelled to assign them not merely to the same author, but to the same period in the author's life. St. John had a tenacious memory, as his writings prove; but we may doubt whether so trivial a matter as the mode of beginning and ending a short letter would have remained for years together in his mind. We may reasonably conclude from their similarity that these two Epistles are separated from one another by only a short interval of time. Verse 12. - Having many things to write. This remark is almost conclusive against the supposition that the Second Epistle was sent as a companion-letter to the First. The hypothesis has little or nothing to support it. I would not (do so) by means of paper and ink. It is astonishing that any one should suppose that intercourse on paper is here opposed to spiritual intercourse: obviously it is opposed to conversation. The elder just writes what is of urgent importance to prevent fatal mistakes during the present time, and leaves everything else until he can talk matters over with her. Ξάρις is mentioned nowhere else in the New Testament, but is found in the Septuagint (Jeremiah 36:23); it probably means "papyrus." Μέλαν occurs in the parallel passage 3 John 1:13, and in 2 Corinthians 3:3; it was commonly made of lampblack or other soot, and hence the name. But I hope to come unto you; literally, I hope to come to be γένεσθαι at your house. Πρὸς ὑμᾶς is here very much the same as the French chez vous. So also πρὸς ἡμᾶς, Matthew 13:56 (comp. 1 Corinthians 16:7; Galatians 1:18; 1 Thessalonians 3:4; Philemon 1:13). "Face to face" στόμα πρὸς στόμα is exactly the French bouche a bouche. The phrase occurs only here and 3 John 1:14 in the New Testament. In 1 Corinthians 13:12 we have πρόσωπον πρὸς πρόσωπον; but there the emphatic thing is that the two should see one another. Here the special point is that they should converse with one another; and this is more clearly expressed by "month to mouth" than by "face to face." For the phrase, "that your joy may be fulfilled," see note on 1 John 1:4, to which passage the apostle may here be consciously referring. That was ever one main purpose of his teaching - the perfecting of Christian joy. Having many things to write unto you,.... Either on a civil, or on a religious account, concerning the state of the churches of Asia, and particularly Ephesus, and of private families and persons, and concerning the truths and doctrines of the Gospel; not that he had any new one, or any other than what they had heard from the beginning, to communicate to them, by word of mouth, for this he denies, 2 John 1:5; wherefore this makes nothing for the unwritten traditions of the Papists, and as if the Scriptures did not contain the whole of doctrine and of the will of God.

I would not write with paper and ink; any more than what was written:

but I trust to come unto you; where they were, but where that was is not known; very likely in some parts of Asia, and it may be not far from Ephesus, since any long journey would not have been fit for the apostle to have taken in this his old age:

and speak face to face; that is, freely and familiarly converse together about things omitted in this epistle:

that our joy may be full; in seeing one another's faces, and through hearing the things that may be talked of; and since the conversation would doubtless turn on divine and evangelic things, so fulness, or a large measure of spiritual joy, may be here intended. Instead of "our joy", the Alexandrian copy, and some others, and the Vulgate Latin and the Ethiopic versions, read, "your joy". 12. I would not write—A heart full of love pours itself out more freely face to face, than by letter.

paper—made of Egyptian papyrus. Pens were then reeds split.

ink—made of soot and water, thickened with gum. Parchment was used for the permanent manuscripts in which the Epistles were preserved. Writing tablets were used merely for temporary purposes, as our slates.

face to face—literally, "mouth to mouth."

full—Greek, "filled full." Your joy will be complete in hearing from me in person the joyful Gospel truths which I now defer communicating till I see you. On other occasions his writing the glad truths was for the same purpose.1:12,13 The apostle refers many things to a personal meeting. Pen and ink were means of strengthening and comforting others; but to see each other is more so. The communion of saints should be maintained by all methods; and should tend to mutual joy. In communion with them we find much of our present joy, and look forward to happiness for ever.
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Alphabetical: and be but come complete do face full have hope I ink Instead joy made many may much not our paper so speak talk that things Though to use visit want with write you your

NT Letters: 2 John 1:12 Having many things to write to you (2J iiJ 2Jn ii jn 2 jo) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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