Matthew 10:2
New International Version
These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (who is called Peter) and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John;

New Living Translation
Here are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (also called Peter), then Andrew (Peter's brother), James (son of Zebedee), John (James's brother),

English Standard Version
The names of the twelve apostles are these: first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Berean Study Bible
These are the names of the twelve apostles: first Simon, called Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John;

Berean Literal Bible
And these are the names of the twelve apostles: first Simon called Peter, and his brother Andrew; and James the son of Zebedee, and his brother John;

New American Standard Bible
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these: The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; and James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

King James Bible
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Christian Standard Bible
These are the names of the twelve apostles: First, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Contemporary English Version
The first of the twelve apostles was Simon, better known as Peter. His brother Andrew was an apostle, and so were James and John, the two sons of Zebedee.

Good News Translation
These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (called Peter) and his brother Andrew; James and his brother John, the sons of Zebedee;

Holman Christian Standard Bible
These are the names of the 12 apostles: First, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

International Standard Version
These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (who is called Peter) and his brother Andrew; James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John;

NET Bible
Now these are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (called Peter), and Andrew his brother; James son of Zebedee and John his brother;

New Heart English Bible
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these. The first, Simon, who is called Peter; and Andrew his brother; and James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But the names of the twelve Apostles were these: the first of them, Shimeon who was called Kaypha, and Andraeus his brother, and Yaqob Bar Zebedee, and Yohannan his brother,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
These are the names of the twelve apostles: first and foremost, Simon (who is called Peter) and his brother Andrew; James and his brother John, the sons of Zebedee;

New American Standard 1977
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these: The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; and James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Jubilee Bible 2000
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these: the first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee and John his brother;

King James 2000 Bible
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

American King James Version
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

American Standard Version
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these: The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the'son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Douay-Rheims Bible
And the names of the twelve apostles are these: The first, Simon who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother,

Darby Bible Translation
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these: first, Simon, who was called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the [son] of Zebedee, and John his brother;

English Revised Version
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these: The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Webster's Bible Translation
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

Weymouth New Testament
Now the names of the twelve Apostles were these: first, Simon called Peter, and his brother Andrew; James the son of Zabdi, and his brother John;

World English Bible
Now the names of the twelve apostles are these. The first, Simon, who is called Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the son of Zebedee; John, his brother;

Young's Literal Translation
And of the twelve apostles the names are these: first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James of Zebedee, and John his brother;
Study Bible
The Twelve Apostles
1And calling His twelve disciples to Him, Jesus gave them authority over unclean spirits, so that they could drive them out and heal every disease and sickness. 2These are the names of the twelve apostles: first Simon, called Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; 3Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus;…
Cross References
Matthew 4:18
As Jesus was walking beside the Sea of Galilee, He saw two brothers, Simon called Peter and his brother Andrew. They were casting a net into the sea, for they were fishermen.

Matthew 4:21
Going on from there, He saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John. They were in a boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. Jesus called them,

Matthew 20:20
Then the mother of Zebedee's sons came to Jesus with her sons and knelt down to make a request of Him.

Mark 3:16
These are the twelve He appointed: Simon (whom He named Peter),

Mark 6:30
Meanwhile, the apostles gathered around Jesus and brought Him news of all they had done and taught.

Luke 6:13
When daylight came, He called His disciples to Him and chose twelve of them, whom He also designated as apostles:

Luke 6:14
Simon, whom He named Peter, and his brother Andrew, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew,

John 6:67
So Jesus asked the Twelve, "Do you want to leave too?"

John 6:70
Jesus answered them, "Have I not chosen you, the Twelve? Yet one of you is a devil!"

John 6:71
He was speaking about Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot. For although Judas was one of the Twelve, he was later to betray Jesus.

Acts 1:13
When they arrived, they went to the upper room where they were staying: Peter and John, James and Andrew, Philip and Thomas, Bartholomew and Matthew, James son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas son of James.

Treasury of Scripture

Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;

apostles.

Luke 6:13
And when it was day, he called unto him his disciples: and of them he chose twelve, whom also he named apostles;

Luke 9:10
And the apostles, when they were returned, told him all that they had done. And he took them, and went aside privately into a desert place belonging to the city called Bethsaida.

Luke 11:49
Therefore also said the wisdom of God, I will send them prophets and apostles, and some of them they shall slay and persecute:

Simon.

Matthew 4:18
And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brethren, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers.

Matthew 16:16-18
And Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God…

Mark 1:16,17
Now as he walked by the sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew his brother casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers…

Andrew.

Mark 1:29
And forthwith, when they were come out of the synagogue, they entered into the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John.

Mark 3:18
And Andrew, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite,

Mark 13:3
And as he sat upon the mount of Olives over against the temple, Peter and James and John and Andrew asked him privately,

James.

Matthew 4:21
And going on from thence, he saw other two brethren, James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother, in a ship with Zebedee their father, mending their nets; and he called them.

Matthew 17:1
And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart,

Matthew 20:20
Then came to him the mother of Zebedee's children with her sons, worshipping him, and desiring a certain thing of him.

John.

Luke 22:8
And he sent Peter and John, saying, Go and prepare us the passover, that we may eat.

John 13:23
Now there was leaning on Jesus' bosom one of his disciples, whom Jesus loved.

John 20:2
Then she runneth, and cometh to Simon Peter, and to the other disciple, whom Jesus loved, and saith unto them, They have taken away the Lord out of the sepulchre, and we know not where they have laid him.







Lexicon
These
ταῦτα (tauta)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Nominative Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 3778: This; he, she, it.

are
ἐστιν (estin)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1510: I am, exist. The first person singular present indicative; a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist.

the
τὰ (ta)
Article - Nominative Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

names
ὀνόματά (onomata)
Noun - Nominative Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 3686: Name, character, fame, reputation. From a presumed derivative of the base of ginosko; a 'name'.

of the
Τῶν (Tōn)
Article - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

twelve
δώδεκα (dōdeka)
Adjective - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 1427: Twelve; the usual way in which the Twelve apostles of Jesus are referred to. From duo and deka; two and ten, i.e. A dozen.

apostles:
ἀποστόλων (apostolōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 652: From apostello; a delegate; specially, an ambassador of the Gospel; officially a commissioner of Christ.

first
πρῶτος (prōtos)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4413: First, before, principal, most important. Contracted superlative of pro; foremost.

Simon,
Σίμων (Simōn)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4613: Simon. Of Hebrew origin; Simon, the name of nine Israelites.

called
λεγόμενος (legomenos)
Verb - Present Participle Middle or Passive - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3004: (a) I say, speak; I mean, mention, tell, (b) I call, name, especially in the pass., (c) I tell, command.

Peter,
Πέτρος (Petros)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4074: Peter, a Greek name meaning rock. Apparently a primary word; a rock; as a name, Petrus, an apostle.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

his
αὐτοῦ (autou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

brother
ἀδελφὸς (adelphos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

Andrew;
Ἀνδρέας (Andreas)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 406: From aner; manly; Andreas, an Israelite.

James
Ἰάκωβος (Iakōbos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2385: The same as Iakob Graecized; Jacobus, the name of three Israelites.

[son]
(ho)
Article - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

of
τοῦ (tou)
Article - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Zebedee,
Ζεβεδαίου (Zebedaiou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2199: Zebedee, father of the apostles James and John. Of Hebrew origin; Zebedaeus, an Israelite.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

his
αὐτοῦ (autou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

brother
ἀδελφὸς (adelphos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

John;
Ἰωάννης (Iōannēs)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2491: Of Hebrew origin; Joannes, the name of four Israelites.
(2) A comparison of the four lists of the Apostles (Matthew 10:2-4, Mark 3:16-19, Luke 6:13-16, Acts 1:13) brings out some interesting facts. (1.) The name of Peter is always first, that of Judas always last. In the former case we recognise acknowledged preeminence. The position of the latter may have been the consequence of the infamy which attached to the name of the traitor; but it is possible (and this may have been one of the elements that entered into his guilt) that his place had always been one of inferiority.

(2.) All the lists divide themselves into three groups of four, the persons in each group being always the same (assuming that the three names, Judas the brother (?) of James, Thaddaeus, and Lebbaeus, belong to the same person), though the order in each group varies.

(3.) The first group includes the two sons of Jona and the two sons of Zebedee, whose twofold call is related in Matthew 4:18-21, John 1:40. In two lists (Mark and Acts) the name of Andrew stands last; in two (Matt. and Luke) that of John. In none of them are the names of Peter and John coupled together, as might have been expected from their close companionship (John 20:2; Acts 3:1). The four obviously occupied the innermost place in the company of the Twelve, and were chosen out of the chosen. The three, Peter, James, and John, were the only witnesses of the healing of Jairus's daughter (Mark 5:37), of the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:1), and of the Agony in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:37). Something seems to have excluded Andrew, though he had been the first called of all (John 1:40), from this intimate companionship; but we find him joined with the other three as called to listen to the great prophetic discourse on the Mount of Olives (Mark 13:3). All the four appear to have come from Bethsaida, on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee.

(4.) The name of Philip is always first in the second group, and he, too, came from Bethsaida. Next, in the three Gospel lists, comes that of Bartholomew. The name, like Barjona and Bartimaeus, was obviously a patronymic, and it was at least probable that he had some other name. The absence of any mention of Bartholomew in St. John's Gospel, or of Nathanael (John 1:45) in the other three, has led most modern commentators to the conclusion that they were two names for the same person; and the juxtaposition of the two names in their lists agrees with the fact that it was Philip who brought him to know Jesus as the Christ (John 1:45). On this assumption, Bartholomew was of Cana, the scene of our Lord's first miracle (John 21:2). The name of Matthew stands before that of Thomas in Mark and Luke, after it in the Gospel which beare his own name. On the change of name from Levi, and his description as the son of Alphaeus, see Notes on Matthew 9:9. As the name of Thomas, or Didymus, means "twin," there seems some ground for believing, from the way in which the two names are grouped together, that here too we have another pair of brothers called to the service of their Master. Eusebius (H. E. i. 13), in his account of the conversion of Abgarus of Edessa, speaks of this Apostle as "Judas who is also Thomas." and this suggests the reason why the cognomen of "the Twin" prevailed over the name which was already borne by two out of the company of the Twelve.

(5.) The third group always begins with "James the son of Alphaeus;" and this description suggests some interesting inferences:--(1.) That he too was a brother of Matthew (there are no grounds for assuming two persons of the name of Alphaeus), and probably, therefore, of Thomas also. (2.) That if the Clopas (not Cleopas) of John 19:25, was, as is generally believed, only the less Graecised form of the name Alphaeus, then his mother Mary may have been the sister of Mary the mother of the Lord (see Notes on John 19:25). (3.) This Mary, in her turn, is identified, on comparing John 19:25 with Mark 15:40, with the mother of James the Less (literally, the Little) and of Joses. The term probably pointed, not to subordinate position, but, as in the case of Zacchaeus, to short stature, and appears to have been an epithet (Luke 19:3) distinguishing him from the James of the first list. The Greek form in both cases was Jacobus--the Jacob of the Old Testament--which has passed, like Joannes, through many changes, till it appears in its present clipped and curtailed shape. (4.) On the assumption that the James and Joses of Mark 15:40 are two of the "brethren of the Lord" of Matthew 13:55, this James might, perhaps, be identified with the James "the brother of the Lord" of Galatians 1:19 and Acts 15:13, the writer of the Epistle. The balance of evidence is, however, decidedly against this view. (Comp. Note on Matthew 13:55.) The next name appears in three different forms: Judas the brother of James (it must be noted, however, that the collocation of the two names is that which is elsewhere rendered "the son of . . ." and that the insertion of the word "brother" is an inference from Jude 1:1) in Luke and Acts; Lebbaeus in Matthew (with the addition, in later MSS. and the textus receptus, of "who is also surnamed Thaddaeus"); Thaddaeus in Mark; St. John names him simply as "Judas, not Iscariot" (Matthew 14:22). The explanation of the variations is natural enough. One who bore the name of Judas wanted something to distinguish him. This might be found either in the term which expressed his relation as son or brother to James the son of Alphaeus, or in a personal epithet. Lebbaeus suggests a derivation from the Hebrew leb (heart), and points to warmth and earnestness of character; thad, in later Hebrew, meant the female breast, and may have been the origin of Thaddaeus, as indicating, even more than the other sobriquet, a feminine devotedness. Taking the three names together, they suggest the thought that he was one of the youngest of the Twelve, and was looked upon by the others with an affection which showed itself in the name thus given to him. Simon, too, needed a distinguishing epithet, and it was found in the two forms of Zelotes and Cananite (not Canaanite). The former may point to zeal as his chief characteristic, but it was more probably used in the sense in which the followers of Judas of Galilee bore the name, and under which they were prominent in the later struggle with the Romans, as in a special sense "zealots for the law" (Jos. Wars, iv. 3, ? 9). (Comp. a like use of the word in Acts 21:20.) On this assumption we get a glimpse, full of interest, into the earlier life of the Apostle so named. The other term, Cananite--which is not a local term, but connected with a Hebrew verb, kana, to be hot, to glow, to be zealous--expresses the same idea. Lastly, we have "Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed Him," described by St. John as the "son of Simon" (John 6:71; John 12:4; John 13:2; John 13:26), the term "Iscariot" being applied in the first and last of these passages to the father. These facts seem to leave little doubt that the name is local, and is the Graecised form of Ish-Kerioth (a man of Kerioth), a town in Judah mentioned in the list of Joshua 15:25. Assuming this inference, we have in him the only one among the Twelve of whom it is probable that he was of Judah, and not of Galilee. This also may not have been without its influence on his character, separating him, as it might well tend to do, from the devoted loyalty of the others.

Verses 2-4. - THE NAMES OF THE AGENTS. Parallel passages: Mark 3:14-19; Luke 6:13-16 (cf. Acts 1:13). This Commentary upon St. Luke deals so fully both with the list as a whole and with the separate names that it will not be necessary to say much here. Observe that the general agreement in arrangement points to some common basis underlying all four accounts; also that of these the one found in the Acts is the briefest, giving little more than the bare names; and that that found in our Gospel, on the contrary, is the fullest, containing, with two exceptions (vide infra), the details mentioned in one or other of the parallels, and adding two of its own. It mentions, in one instance or more, the parentage (Zebedee, Alphaeus), the relationship ("his brother... his brother"), the birthplace (Kerioth), the earlier occupation and religious standpoint ("publican... Zealot"), and, with a bare hint at the beginning (vide infra), but a clear statement at the end, the after-history ("first... who also betrayed him") of the apostles. The two omissions are the fact that our Lord added the names of Peter (parallels, but really given earlier, John 1:42) and Boanerges (Mark). Verse 2. - Now the names, In the parallels part of the word "names" is found as a verb, "whom also he named apostles;" i.e. the naming there refers, not to the individuals, but to their office. Is the form found in our Gospel an "accidental" rearrangement due to a reminiscence that the word "name" occurred in the earliest source, or is it possible that the two facts are connected, and that the individuals received a new name when they definitely entered on a new office? That they should have received a new name seems a priori not improbable, but the evidence is very slight. "Peter" is a clear case, for though the name was given earlier, it would receive a new application now, and perhaps was now again expressly given (cf. parallel passages); and other cases may be St. Matthew (vide Introduction, p. 21.) and possibly St. Bartholomew and St. Thaddaeus. Mark expressly says that the term "Boanerges" was given to the sons of Zebedee; but as there is no evidence that either St. James or St. John was afterwards known by this name, it need not have been a name in the same sense in which the others were. Observe the formal order of the first words of this verse (τῶν δὲ δώδεκα ἀποστόλων τὰ ὀνόματα ἐστιν ταῦτα). Did the author of the Gospel take them from the heading of a section that already contained the names in order? If so the δέ would probably not have existed there, and it is worth noting that the original hand of D, the manuscript that is of special value for Palestinian tradition, omits it. Of the twelve (ver. 1, note) apostles (ver. 5, note) are these: The first. This, perhaps, refers to the order of call, Luke 5:1 (Nosgen), but more probably to the leading position that St. Peter held among the twelve. On this leadership, cf. the fragmentary excursus by Bishop Lightfoot, printed in 'Clement of Rome,' 2. 487 (1890). Simon. His Hebrew name was Simeon (שמעון, Acts 15:14, and 2 Peter 1:1, in the Received Text and Westcott and Herr margin), but his Gentile name (Matthew 3:1, note) was Simon, this good Greek name being chosen as almost identical in sound. It occurs frequently in the Palestinian Talmud (סימון). Who is called Peter. In common Christian parlance (Matthew 4:18; cf. Matthew 16:18). 10:1-4 The word apostle signifies messenger; they were Christ's messengers, sent forth to proclaim his kingdom. Christ gave them power to heal all manner of sickness. In the grace of the gospel there is a slave for every sore, a remedy for every malady. There is no spiritual disease, but there is power in Christ for the cure of it. There names are recorded, and it is their honour; yet they had more reason to rejoice that their names were written in heaven, while the high and mighty names of the great ones of the earth are buried in the dust.
Jump to Previous
Andrew Apostles First James John Names Peter Simon Twelve Zabdi Zebedee Zeb'edee
Jump to Next
Andrew Apostles First James John Names Peter Simon Twelve Zabdi Zebedee Zeb'edee
Links
Matthew 10:2 NIV
Matthew 10:2 NLT
Matthew 10:2 ESV
Matthew 10:2 NASB
Matthew 10:2 KJV

Matthew 10:2 Bible Apps
Matthew 10:2 Biblia Paralela
Matthew 10:2 Chinese Bible
Matthew 10:2 French Bible
Matthew 10:2 German Bible

Alphabetical: and Andrew apostles are brother called first his is James John names Now of Peter Peter Simon Simonwho son the These twelve who Zebedee

NT Gospels: Matthew 10:2 Now the names of the twelve apostles (Matt. Mat Mt) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Matthew 10:1
Top of Page
Top of Page