Matthew 17:1
New International Version
After six days Jesus took with him Peter, James and John the brother of James, and led them up a high mountain by themselves.

New Living Translation
Six days later Jesus took Peter and the two brothers, James and John, and led them up a high mountain to be alone.

English Standard Version
And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James, and John his brother, and led them up a high mountain by themselves.

Berean Study Bible
After six days Jesus took with Him Peter, James, and John the brother of James, and led them up a high mountain by themselves.

Berean Literal Bible
And after six days, Jesus takes with Him Peter, and James, and John his brother, and brings them up into a high mountain by themselves.

New American Standard Bible
Six days later Jesus took with Him Peter and James and John his brother, and led them up on a high mountain by themselves.

New King James Version
Now after six days Jesus took Peter, James, and John his brother, led them up on a high mountain by themselves;

King James Bible
And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart,

Christian Standard Bible
After six days Jesus took Peter, James, and his brother John and led them up on a high mountain by themselves.

Contemporary English Version
Six days later Jesus took Peter and the brothers James and John with him. They went up on a very high mountain where they could be alone.

Good News Translation
Six days later Jesus took with him Peter and the brothers James and John and led them up a high mountain where they were alone.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
After six days Jesus took Peter, James, and his brother John and led them up on a high mountain by themselves.

International Standard Version
Six days later, Jesus took Peter, James, and his brother John and led them up a high mountain by themselves.

NET Bible
Six days later Jesus took with him Peter, James, and John the brother of James, and led them privately up a high mountain.

New Heart English Bible
After six days, Jesus took with him Peter, James, and John his brother, and brought them up into a high mountain by themselves.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And after six days Yeshua took Kaypha, Yaqob and Yohannan his brother and brought them up to a high mountain by themselves.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
After six days Jesus took Peter, James, and John (the brother of James) and led them up a high mountain where they could be alone.

New American Standard 1977
And six days later Jesus took with Him Peter and James and John his brother, and brought them up to a high mountain by themselves.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And after six days Jesus took Peter, James, and John, his brother, and brought them apart up into a high mountain

King James 2000 Bible
And after six days Jesus took Peter, James, and John his brother, and brought them up into a high mountain apart,

American King James Version
And after six days Jesus takes Peter, James, and John his brother, and brings them up into an high mountain apart,

American Standard Version
And after six days Jesus taketh with him Peter, and James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into a high mountain apart:

Douay-Rheims Bible
AND after six days Jesus taketh unto him Peter and James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into a high mountain apart:

Darby Bible Translation
And after six days Jesus takes with [him] Peter, and James, and John his brother, and brings them up into a high mountain apart.

English Revised Version
And after six days Jesus taketh with him Peter, and James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into a high mountain apart:

Webster's Bible Translation
And after six days, Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them upon a high mountain apart.

Weymouth New Testament
Six day later, Jesus took with Him Peter and the brothers James and John, and brought them up a high mountain to a solitary place.

World English Bible
After six days, Jesus took with him Peter, James, and John his brother, and brought them up into a high mountain by themselves.

Young's Literal Translation
And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, and James, and John his brother, and doth bring them up to a high mount by themselves,
Study Bible
The Transfiguration
1After six days Jesus took with Him Peter, James, and John the brother of James, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. 2There He was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and His clothes became as white as the light.…
Cross References
Matthew 17:2
There He was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and His clothes became as white as the light.

Matthew 26:37
He took with Him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee and began to be sorrowful and deeply distressed.

Mark 5:37
And He did not allow anyone to accompany Him except Peter, James, and John the brother of James.

Mark 9:2
After six days, Jesus took with Him Peter, James, and John, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. There He was transfigured before them.

Mark 13:3
While Jesus was sitting on the Mount of Olives opposite the temple, Peter, James, John, and Andrew asked Him privately,

Luke 9:28
About eight days after Jesus had said these things, He took with Him Peter, John, and James, and went up on a mountain to pray.

2 Peter 1:16
For we did not follow cleverly devised fables when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of His majesty.

Treasury of Scripture

And after six days Jesus takes Peter, James, and John his brother, and brings them up into an high mountain apart,

after.

Mark 9:2
And after six days Jesus taketh with him Peter, and James, and John, and leadeth them up into an high mountain apart by themselves: and he was transfigured before them.

Luke 9:28
And it came to pass about an eight days after these sayings, he took Peter and John and James, and went up into a mountain to pray.

Peter.

Matthew 26:37
And he took with him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be sorrowful and very heavy.

Mark 5:37
And he suffered no man to follow him, save Peter, and James, and John the brother of James.

Luke 8:51
And when he came into the house, he suffered no man to go in, save Peter, and James, and John, and the father and the mother of the maiden.

an high.

2 Peter 1:18
And this voice which came from heaven we heard, when we were with him in the holy mount.







Lexicon
After
μεθ’ (meth’)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 3326: (a) gen: with, in company with, (b) acc: (1) behind, beyond, after, of place, (2) after, of time, with nouns, neut. of adjectives.

six
ἓξ (hex)
Adjective - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 1803: Six. A primary numeral; six.

days
ἡμέρας (hēmeras)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 2250: A day, the period from sunrise to sunset.

Jesus
Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2424: Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord and two other Israelites.

took with [Him]
παραλαμβάνει (paralambanei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 3880: From para and lambano; to receive near, i.e. Associate with oneself; by analogy, to assume an office; figuratively, to learn.

Peter,
Πέτρον (Petron)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4074: Peter, a Greek name meaning rock. Apparently a primary word; a rock; as a name, Petrus, an apostle.

James,
Ἰάκωβον (Iakōbon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2385: The same as Iakob Graecized; Jacobus, the name of three Israelites.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

John
Ἰωάννην (Iōannēn)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2491: Of Hebrew origin; Joannes, the name of four Israelites.

the
τὸν (ton)
Article - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

brother
ἀδελφὸν (adelphon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 80: A brother, member of the same religious community, especially a fellow-Christian. A brother near or remote.

of [James],
αὐτοῦ (autou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

led them up
ἀναφέρει (anapherei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 399: From ana and phero; to take up.

a high
ὑψηλὸν (hypsēlon)
Adjective - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 5308: High, lofty. From hupsos; lofty.

mountain
ὄρος (oros)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 3735: A mountain, hill. Probably from an obsolete oro; a mountain: -hill, mount(-ain).

by
κατ’ (kat’)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 2596: A primary particle; down, in varied relations (genitive, dative or accusative) with which it is joined).

themselves.
ἰδίαν (idian)
Adjective - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2398: Pertaining to self, i.e. One's own; by implication, private or separate.
XVII.

(1) After six days.--St. Luke's "about eight days" (Luke 9:28) may be noted as an example of the mode of reckoning which spoke of the interval between our Lord's death and resurrection, about six-and-thirty hours, as three days.

Peter, James, and John.--The three retain their position, as in the raising of Jairus's daughter, as the elect among the elect. (Comp. also Matthew 26:37; Mark 13:3.) Looking to the grouping of the Apostles it might have seemed natural that Andrew also should have been there, but his character seems to have been always retiring, and, it may be, was wanting in the intensity of faith which belonged to his brother, the Rock-Apostle, and to the two Sons of Thunder.

Into an high mountain.--A tradition of uncertain date fixes on Tabor as the scene of the Transfiguration, but this was probably due to the conspicuous position of that mountain, as it rises abruptly from the plain of Esdraelon. The Gospel narratives leave the locality altogether uncertain, but as Caesarea Philippi was the last place mentioned, and a journey through Galilee follows (Mark 9:30), it is more probable that the scene is to be found on one of the heights of Hermon. Tabor, it may be added, was crowned with a fortress, which at this time was likely to be occupied, and this is obviously inconsistent with the solitude which the narrative implies.

Verses 1-13. - The Transfiguration of Jesus. (Mark 9:2-13; Luke 9:28-36.) This mysterious event was intended primarily to confirm the faith of the three apostles who were to have the chief hand in founding the Church. The Lord had just announced his future sufferings and death. This prediction had been a grievous blow to Peter, and doubtless to the others also. He had stumbled at the cross, and had brought on himself a stern rebuke for his slowness and worldliness. So to comfort the chosen three under the thought of what awaited their Master, they were shown a glimpse of the glory which he has in heaven; they saw the Law and the prophets yielding subjection to him; they heard the voice of the Father announcing his Sonship. Henceforward they might take courage under all circumstances; the cross would be no infamy or disgrace - would open the way to victory and glory. Here was a foretaste of the blessedness of heaven - to be with Christ and his saints in his kingdom. Such was the Transfiguration to the three witnesses. To the world, when in due time it was made known, it taught lessons of the Incarnation, the resurrection of the body, the glory that shall be the portion of the righteous. For Christ himself it was the culminating point of his earthly life, "the solemn installation of our Lord to his sufferings and their result" (Alford). Verse 1. - After six days. St. Luke says, "about an eight days after these sayings," either speaking indefinitely, or using the inclusive method of reckoning which we find in the recounts of our Lord's resurrection. The days are counted from the time of Peter's confession and Christ's subsequent announcement. The little company were still in the neighbourhood of Caesarea Philippi, though we know not exactly in what place, and nothing is told of the events of this week. The memorable day may be specially noticed as being the same day of the week as that on which the great confession was made in the previous se'nnight; or, if we regard the typical bearing of numbers in Scripture, the six days signify the world and daily labour, the seventh, "after six days," typifies heaven and rest. Peter, James, and John. These three, the chosen of the chosen, had already witnessed Christ's power over death in the chamber of Jairus's daughter; later they were present at the agony in the Garden of Gethsemane. They who had seen his glory were strengthened to behold his sweat of blood. These men formed the inner circle of his friends; to them he gave the privilege of knowing more of his inner life and nature. They were selected for various reasons - Peter, for his energy, zeal, and love, and the part he was to play in the founding of the Church; John, because he was beloved by Christ, and was to be the recipient of Divine revelation; James, because he was to be the head of the Church of Jerusalem, and soon to drink of Christ's cup and war a good warfare. The James here named is the son of Zebedee, and brother of John, and was put to death by Herod Agrippa (Acts 12.). An high mountain. The only tradition concerning the locality of the Transfiguration (which none of the inspired narratives further identifies) affixes it to Mount Tabor, the beautiful isolated mountain, which rises some eighteen hundred feet on the northeast of the Plain of Esdraelon. This tradition, as far as we know, was first published in the fourth century A.D, by St. Cyril of Jerusalem ('Catech.,' 12:16) and St. Jerome (Ep. 44. 'Ad Marcell.;' Ep. 108. 'Ad Eustoch.'), and thence was generally adopted and upheld till the sixteenth century, both by commentators and travellers. Since then more accurate examination and historical criticism have thrown grave doubts on this identification. The summit of Tabor has from a very early age been occupied by habitations. It is spoken of in 1 Chronicles 6:77 as including in its limits a city and its suburbs. Later it was strongly fortified, and the whole area was surrounded with a wall, of which the ruins can still be traced. In our Lord's time the town and the fortress covered the level portion of the hill, and there would have been no place of retirement where he could have withdrawn apart for the purpose of the vision. There is another reason that makes Tabor unlikely to have been the scene of the Transfiguration. The last geographical notice left our Lord and his disciples outside Galilee in the neighbourhood of Paneas. It was about a three days' journey thence to Esdraelon; but no mention is made of any such movement during this week, and it is after the Transfiguration that the synoptists intimate that the return to Galilee took place (see ver. 22; Mark 9:30). We must therefore surrender the old tradition, and look in the vicinity of Caesarea for the high mountain of our narrative. There was no lack of such in that region, and it was doubtless on one of the offshoots of Hermon that the glorious vision was vouchsafed, though more precise identification is impossible. Hermon itself is called by the Arabs Jebel-esh-Sheikh, "The Chief Mountain," and the way in which the locality is introduced in the narrative, without further specification, seems to point to some eminence of the most obvious and best known hill of the district. St. Peter, when in after years he alluded to it, called it merely "the holy mount" (2 Peter 1:18); and we may conclude that we are not intended to know more about it, lest we should be tempted to make more of the material circumstances than of the great reality. St. Luke notifies that the Lord retired to this place in order to pray. It may have been that he prayed for the enlightemnent of the apostles - that they might receive the teaching of the Transfiguration and the subsequent sayings. 17:1-13 Now the disciples beheld somewhat of Christ's glory, as of the only begotten of the Father. It was intended to support their faith, when they would have to witness his crucifixion; and would give them an idea of the glory prepared for them, when changed by his power and made like him. The apostles were overcome by the glorious sight. Peter thought that it was most desirable to continue there, and to go no more down to meet the sufferings of which he was so unwilling to hear. In this he knew not what he said. We are wrong, if we look for a heaven here upon earth. Whatever tabernacles we propose to make for ourselves in this world, we must always remember to ask Christ's leave. That sacrifice was not yet offered, without which the souls of sinful men could not have been saved; and important services were to be done by Peter and his brethren. While Peter spoke, a bright cloud overshadowed them, an emblem of the Divine presence and glory. Ever since man sinned, and heard God's voice in the garden, unusual appearances of God have been terrible to man. They fell prostrate to the earth, till Jesus encouraged them; when looking round, they beheld only their Lord as they commonly saw him. We must pass through varied experiences in our way to glory; and when we return to the world after an ordinance, it must be our care to take Christ with us, and then it may be our comfort that he is with us.
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