Acts 12:1
New International Version
It was about this time that King Herod arrested some who belonged to the church, intending to persecute them.

New Living Translation
About that time King Herod Agrippa began to persecute some believers in the church.

English Standard Version
About that time Herod the king laid violent hands on some who belonged to the church.

Berean Study Bible
About that time, King Herod reached out to inflict harm on some who belonged to the church.

Berean Literal Bible
Now at that time, Herod the king put forth the hands to mistreat some of those of the church.

New American Standard Bible
Now about that time Herod the king laid hands on some who belonged to the church in order to mistreat them.

King James Bible
Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to vex certain of the church.

Christian Standard Bible
About that time King Herod violently attacked some who belonged to the church,

Contemporary English Version
At that time King Herod caused terrible suffering for some members of the church.

Good News Translation
About this time King Herod began to persecute some members of the church.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
About that time King Herod cruelly attacked some who belonged to the church,

International Standard Version
About that time, Herod arrested some people who belonged to the church and mistreated them.

NET Bible
About that time King Herod laid hands on some from the church to harm them.

New Heart English Bible
Now about that time, Herod the king stretched out his hands to oppress some of the church.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But at that time, King Herodus, who was surnamed Agrippa, was laying hands on the people who were in the churches, to do evil to them.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
About that time King Herod devoted his attention to mistreating certain members of the church.

New American Standard 1977
Now about that time Herod the king laid hands on some who belonged to the church, in order to mistreat them.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Now at that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to mistreat certain of the congregation {Gr. ekklesia – called out ones}.

King James 2000 Bible
Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to persecute certain of the church.

American King James Version
Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to vex certain of the church.

American Standard Version
Now about that time Herod the king put forth his hands to afflict certain of the church.

Douay-Rheims Bible
AND at the same time, Herod the king stretched forth his hands, to afflict some of the church.

Darby Bible Translation
At that time Herod the king laid his hands on some of those of the assembly to do them hurt,

English Revised Version
Now about that time Herod the king put forth his hands to afflict certain of the church.

Webster's Bible Translation
Now about that time, Herod the king stretched forth his hands to afflict certain of the church.

Weymouth New Testament
Now, about that time, King Herod arrested certain members of the Church, in order to ill-treat them;

World English Bible
Now about that time, King Herod stretched out his hands to oppress some of the assembly.

Young's Literal Translation
And about that time, Herod the king put forth his hands, to do evil to certain of those of the assembly,
Study Bible
James Killed, Peter Imprisoned
1About that time, King Herod reached out to inflict harm on some who belonged to the church. 2He had James, the brother of John, put to death with the sword.…
Cross References
Psalm 125:3
For the scepter of the wicked will not rest upon the land allotted to the righteous, so that the righteous will not put forth their hands to injustice.

Matthew 14:1
At that time Herod the tetrarch heard the reports about Jesus

Matthew 14:3
Now Herod had arrested John and bound him and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip's wife,

Matthew 14:6
On Herod's birthday, however, the daughter of Herodias danced before them, and pleased Herod

Acts 11:30
This they did, sending their gifts to the elders with Barnabas and Saul.

Acts 12:2
He had James, the brother of John, put to death with the sword.

Treasury of Scripture

Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to vex certain of the church.

Cir.

Acts 4:30
By stretching forth thine hand to heal; and that signs and wonders may be done by the name of thy holy child Jesus.

Acts 9:31
Then had the churches rest throughout all Judaea and Galilee and Samaria, and were edified; and walking in the fear of the Lord, and in the comfort of the Holy Ghost, were multiplied.

Luke 22:53
When I was daily with you in the temple, ye stretched forth no hands against me: but this is your hour, and the power of darkness.

to vex.

Matthew 10:17,18
But beware of men: for they will deliver you up to the councils, and they will scourge you in their synagogues; …

Matthew 24:9
Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name's sake.

John 15:20
Remember the word that I said unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord. If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you; if they have kept my saying, they will keep yours also.







Lexicon
About
Κατ’ (Kat’)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 2596: A primary particle; down, in varied relations (genitive, dative or accusative) with which it is joined).

that
ἐκεῖνον (ekeinon)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 1565: That, that one there, yonder. From ekei; that one (neuter) thing); often intensified by the article prefixed.

time,
καιρὸν (kairon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2540: Fitting season, season, opportunity, occasion, time. Of uncertain affinity; an occasion, i.e. Set or proper time.

King
βασιλεὺς (basileus)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 935: A king, ruler, but in some passages clearly to be translated: emperor. Probably from basis; a sovereign.

Herod
Ἡρῴδης (Hērōdēs)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2264: Compound of heros and eidos; heroic; Herod, the name of four Jewish kings.

reached out
ἐπέβαλεν (epebalen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1911: From epi and ballo; to throw upon; specially to reflect; impersonally, to belong to.

to inflict harm on
κακῶσαί (kakōsai)
Verb - Aorist Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 2559: To treat badly, afflict, embitter, make angry. From kakos; to injure; figuratively, to exasperate.

some
τινας (tinas)
Interrogative / Indefinite Pronoun - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 5100: Any one, some one, a certain one or thing. An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.

who
τῶν (tōn)
Article - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

belonged to
ἀπὸ (apo)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 575: From, away from. A primary particle; 'off, ' i.e. Away, in various senses.

the
τῆς (tēs)
Article - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

church.
ἐκκλησίας (ekklēsias)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1577: From a compound of ek and a derivative of kaleo; a calling out, i.e. a popular meeting, especially a religious congregation.
XII.

(1) Herod the king.--The previous life of this prince had been full of strange vicissitudes. The son of Aristobulus and Bernice, grandson of Herod the Great, brother of the Herodias who appears in the Gospel history, named after the statesman who was the chief minister of Augustus, he had been sent, after his father had fallen a victim (B.C. 6) to his grandfather's suspicions, to Rome, partly, perhaps, as a hostage, partly to be out of the way of Palestine intrigues. There he had grown up on terms of intimacy with the prince afterwards known as Caligula. On the marriage of Herod Antipas with his sister, he was made the ruler of Tiberias, but soon quarrelled with the Tetrarch and went to Rome, and falling under the displeasure of Tiberius, as having rashly given utterance to a wish for the succession of Caligula, was imprisoned by him and remained in confinement till the death of that emperor. When Caligula came to the throne, he loaded his friend with honours, gave him the tetrarchies first of Philip, and then that of Lysanias (Luke 3:1), and conferred on him the title of King. Antipas, prompted by Herodias, came to Rome to claim a like honour for himself, but fell under the emperor's displeasure, and was banished to Lugdunum in Gaul, whither his wife accompanied him. His tetrarchy also was conferred on Agrippa. Coins are extant, minted at Caesarea, and bearing inscriptions in which he is styled the Great King, with the epithets sometimes of Philo-Caesar, sometimes of Philo-Claudios. At the time when Caligula's insanity took the form of a resolve to place his statue in the Temple at Jerusalem, Agrippa rendered an essential service to his people, by using all his influence to deter the emperor from carrying his purpose into execution, and, backed as he was by Petronius, the Governor of Syria, was at last successful. On the death of Caligula, Claudius, whose claims to the empire he had supported, confirmed him in his kingdom. When he came to Judaea, he presented himself to the people in the character of a devout worshipper, and gained their favour by attaching himself to the companies of Nazarites (as we find St. Paul doing in Acts 21:26) when they came to the Temple to offer sacrifices on the completion of their vows (Jos. Ant. xix. 7, ? 3). It would seem that he found a strong popular excitement against the believers in Christ, caused probably by the new step which had recently been taken in the admission of the Gentiles, and fomented by the Sadducean priesthood, and it seemed to him politic to gain the favour of both priests and people, by making himself the instrument of their jealousy.

Verse 1. - Put for stretched, A.V.; afflict for vex, A.V. The phrase, About that time, as in Acts 19:23, points to what had just before been related (Meyer). The interposition of the narrative in this chapter between Acts 11:20 and Acts 12:25 evidently implies that the bulk or rather the chief of the events narrated happened in the interval. Which of the events was the chief in the mind of the narrator with reference to his general narrative, and what are the coincidences which he wished to note, it is not easy to say with certainty. The narrative in this chapter doubtless overlaps at both ends the embassy of Paul and Barnabas, but perhaps the object was to show the harassed state of the Church from famine and persecution at the time that Paul and Barnabas were at Jerusalem. Herod the king here mentioned is Herod Agrippa I., grandson of Herod the Great, and son of Aristobulus and Bernice. During the reign of Tiberius he resided at Rome, in alternate favor and disgrace, sometimes banished, sometimes a prisoner, sometimes a guest at the imperial court. He was a great friend of Caius Caesar Caligula, and, on his succeeding to the empire on the death of Tiberius, was promoted by him to the tetrarchy of Herod Philip, with the title of king. He was further advanced three years afterwards to the tetrarchy of Herod Antipas; and, on the accession of Claudius to the throne, Judaea and Samaria were added to his dominions, which now comprised the whole kingdom of his grandfather, Herod the Great. Agrippa, in spite of his close intimacy with Drusus, Caligula, Claudius, and other Roman magnates, was "exactly careful in the observance of the laws of his country, not allowing a day to pass without its appointed sacrifice;" and he had given proof of his strong Jewish feeling by interposing his whole influence with Caligula to prevent his statue being placed in the holy of holies. This spirit accounts for his enmity against the Church. He was a man of very expensive and luxurious habits, but not without some great qualities. 12:1-5 James was one of the sons of Zebedee, whom Christ told that they should drink of the cup that he was to drink of, and be baptized with the baptism that he was to be baptized with, Mt 20:23. Now the words of Christ were made good in him; and if we suffer with Christ, we shall reign with him. Herod imprisoned Peter: the way of persecution, as of other sins, is downhill; when men are in it, they cannot easily stop. Those make themselves an easy prey to Satan, who make it their business to please men. Thus James finished his course. But Peter, being designed for further services, was safe; though he seemed now marked out for a speedy sacrifice. We that live in a cold, prayerless generation, can hardly form an idea of the earnestness of these holy men of old. But if the Lord should bring on the church an awful persecution like this of Herod, the faithful in Christ would learn what soul-felt prayer is.
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