Judges 15:5
New International Version
lit the torches and let the foxes loose in the standing grain of the Philistines. He burned up the shocks and standing grain, together with the vineyards and olive groves.

New Living Translation
Then he lit the torches and let the foxes run through the grain fields of the Philistines. He burned all their grain to the ground, including the sheaves and the uncut grain. He also destroyed their vineyards and olive groves.

English Standard Version
And when he had set fire to the torches, he let the foxes go into the standing grain of the Philistines and set fire to the stacked grain and the standing grain, as well as the olive orchards.

Berean Study Bible
Then he lit the torches and released the foxes into the standing grain of the Philistines, burning up the piles of grain and the standing grain, as well as the vineyards and olive groves.

New American Standard Bible
When he had set fire to the torches, he released the foxes into the standing grain of the Philistines, thus burning up both the shocks and the standing grain, along with the vineyards and groves.

King James Bible
And when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing corn, with the vineyards and olives.

Christian Standard Bible
Then he ignited the torches and released the foxes into the standing grain of the Philistines. He burned the piles of grain and the standing grain as well as the vineyards and olive groves.

Contemporary English Version
Then Samson took the foxes into the Philistine wheat fields that were ready to be harvested. He set the rags on fire and let the foxes go. The wheat fields went up in flames, and so did the stacks of wheat that had already been cut. Even the Philistine vineyards and olive orchards burned.

Good News Translation
Then he set fire to the torches and turned the foxes loose in the Philistine wheat fields. In this way he burned up not only the wheat that had been harvested but also the wheat that was still in the fields. The olive orchards were also burned.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then he ignited the torches and released the foxes into the standing grain of the Philistines. He burned up the piles of grain and the standing grain as well as the vineyards and olive groves.

International Standard Version
Then he ignited the torches, set the foxes loose into the Philistines' unharvested grain, and burned up both the harvested shocks and the standing grain, along with their vineyards and olive groves.

NET Bible
He lit the torches and set the jackals loose in the Philistines' standing grain. He burned up the grain heaps and the standing grain, as well as the vineyards and olive groves.

New Heart English Bible
And when he had set fire to the torches, he let them go into the standing grain of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks and the standing grain, as well as the vineyards and olive groves.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
He set the torches on fire and released the foxes in the Philistines' grain fields. So he set fire to all their grain, whether it was stacked or in the fields. Their olive orchards also caught on fire.

JPS Tanakh 1917
And when he had set the torches on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks and the standing corn, and also the oliveyards.

New American Standard 1977
When he had set fire to the torches, he released the foxes into the standing grain of the Philistines, thus burning up both the shocks and the standing grain, along with the vineyards and groves.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Then, setting the torches on fire, he let them go into the standing grain of the Philistines and burnt up both the shocks and also the standing grain with the vineyards and oliveyards.

King James 2000 Bible
And when he had set the torches on fire, he let them go into the standing grain of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing grain, with the vineyards and olives.

American King James Version
And when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing corn, with the vineyards and olives.

American Standard Version
And when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing grain of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks and the standing grain, and also the oliveyards.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
And he set fire to the torches, and sent the foxes into the corn of the Philistines; and every thing was burnt from the threshing floor to the standing corn, and even to the vineyard and olives.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And setting them on fire he let the foxes go, that they might run about hither and thither. And they presently went into the standing corn of the Philistines. Which being set on fire, both the corn that was already carried together, and that which was yet standing, was all burnt, insomuch, that the flame consumed also the vineyards and the oliveyards.

Darby Bible Translation
And he set the torches on fire, and let [them] run into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing corn, and the olive gardens.

English Revised Version
And when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks and the standing corn, and also the oliveyards.

Webster's Bible Translation
And when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks and also the standing corn, with the vineyards and olives.

World English Bible
When he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing grain of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks and the standing grain, and also the olive groves.

Young's Literal Translation
and kindleth fire in the torches, and sendeth them out into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burneth it from heap even unto standing corn, even unto vineyard -- olive-yard.
Study Bible
Samson's Revenge
4Then Samson went out and caught three hundred foxes. And he took torches, turned the foxes tail-to-tail, and fastened a torch between each pair of tails. 5Then he lit the torches and released the foxes into the standing grain of the Philistines, burning up the piles of grain and the standing grain, as well as the vineyards and olive groves. 6“Who did this?” the Philistines demanded. “It was Samson, the son-in-law of the Timnite,” they were told. “For his wife was given to his companion.” So the Philistines went up and burned her and her father to death.…
Cross References
Exodus 23:11
but in the seventh year you must let it rest and lie fallow, so that the poor among your people may eat of the field, and the wild animals may consume what they leave. Do the same with your vineyard and olive grove.

Judges 15:4
Then Samson went out and caught three hundred foxes. And he took torches, turned the foxes tail-to-tail, and fastened a torch between each pair of tails.

Judges 15:6
"Who did this?" the Philistines demanded. "It was Samson, the son-in-law of the Timnite," they were told. "For his wife was given to his companion." So the Philistines went up and burned her and her father to death.

Treasury of Scripture

And when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing corn, with the vineyards and olives.

he let them go

Exodus 22:6
If fire break out, and catch in thorns, so that the stacks of corn, or the standing corn, or the field, be consumed therewith; he that kindled the fire shall surely make restitution.

2 Samuel 14:30
Therefore he said unto his servants, See, Joab's field is near mine, and he hath barley there; go and set it on fire. And Absalom's servants set the field on fire.







Lexicon
Then he lit
וַיַּבְעֶר־ (way·yaḇ·‘er-)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Hifil - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 1197: To kindle, consume, to be, brutish

the torches
בַּלַּפִּידִ֔ים (bal·lap·pî·ḏîm)
Preposition-b, Article | Noun - masculine plural
Strong's Hebrew 3940: A flambeau, lamp, flame

and released [the foxes]
וַיְשַׁלַּ֖ח (way·šal·laḥ)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Piel - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7971: To send away, for, out

into the standing grain
בְּקָמ֣וֹת (bə·qā·mō·wṯ)
Preposition-b | Noun - feminine plural construct
Strong's Hebrew 7054: Something that rises, a stalk of grain

of the Philistines,
פְּלִשְׁתִּ֑ים (pə·liš·tîm)
Noun - proper - masculine plural
Strong's Hebrew 6430: Philistines -- inhabitants of Philistia

burning up
וַיַּבְעֵ֛ר (way·yaḇ·‘êr)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Hifil - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 1197: To kindle, consume, to be, brutish

the piles of grain
מִגָּדִ֥ישׁ (mig·gā·ḏîš)
Preposition-m | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 1430: A stack of sheaves, a tomb

and the standing grain,
קָמָ֖ה (qā·māh)
Noun - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7054: Something that rises, a stalk of grain

as well as
וְעַד־ (wə·‘aḏ-)
Conjunctive waw | Preposition
Strong's Hebrew 5704: As far as, even to, up to, until, while

the vineyards
כֶּ֥רֶם (ke·rem)
Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's Hebrew 3754: A garden, vineyard

and olive groves.
זָֽיִת׃ (zā·yiṯ)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 2132: An olive, the tree, the branch, the berry
(5) Into the standing corn of the Philistines.--He probably did this at night, when his actions would be unobserved, and no one would be at hand to quench the flames. We may imagine him watching the trails of fire from his rocky fastness, and exulting as the conflagration reddened the night. The heat of a tropical country makes everything so dry that his plan would be certain to succeed. To burn the crops of an Arab is to this day the deadliest of all injuries (Burckhardt). This was the method adopted by Absalom, in 2Samuel 14:30, to gain an interview with Joab. It is needless to point out that the adoption of these rough, coarse, and cruel expedients must be as little judged by a later and better standard as his thirst for the revenge of personal wrongs. There can be no ground to question the literal truth of the narrative. It is in entire accordance with the custom of the East, and it finds curious confirmation from the story in Ovid's Fasti, that every year, at the Cerealia, torches were tied to the tails of foxes, and they were let loose in the Roman circus, to commemorate the incident that on one occasion a young man at Carseoli, to punish a fox for depredations on his hen-coops, had wrapped it up in straw, and set it on fire, and that the creature had escaped into the corn-fields and burnt down the standing crops (Ovid, Fasti, iv. 681-711). The attempt of Bochart to establish any connection between this custom and the revenge of Samson is quite untenable, but the incident itself throws light on the possibility of the narrative. Ewald refers to Meghad�ta, liv. 4; Babrius, Fab., 11

Both the shocks, and also the standing corn.--Literally, from the heap, even up to the standing. The extent of the vengeance and its terrible future consequences would be fully, and we fear ruthlessly, estimated by Samson, as he saw the rivers of fire running and spreading through that vast plain of corn-land in harvest-time. (Comp. Exodus 22:6.)

With the vineyards and olives.--Literally, and to vineyard, to olive. There may be some slight corruption in the text, or it may be an abbreviation of "from vineyard to vineyard, and from olive to olive." (Comp. Micah 7:12.) The low vines festooning the trees and trellis-work, and the olives with their dry trunks, would be sure to suffer injury.

Verse 5. - The shocks and the standing corn. See ver. 1, note. With the vineyards and olives. The Hebrew text has the orchards of olive trees - the word cherem, usually translated vineyard, meaning also any orchard; but the Septuagint in both codices supplies and, as does the A. Y., which gives the more probable sense, vineyards and olives. It is unlikely that the vineyards should not be mentioned, in a district abounding in them. 15:1-8 When there are differences between relations, let those be reckoned the wisest and best, who are most forward to forgive or forget, and most willing to stoop and yield for the sake of peace. In the means which Samson employed, we must look at the power of God supplying them, and making them successful, to mortify the pride and punish the wickedness of the Philistines. The Philistines threatened Samson's wife that they would burn her and her father's house. She, to save herself and oblige her countrymen, betrayed her husband; and the very thing that she feared, and by sin sought to avoid, came upon her! She, and her father's house, were burnt with fire, and by her countrymen, whom she thought to oblige by the wrong she did to her husband. The mischief we seek to escape by any unlawful practices, we often pull down upon our own heads.
Jump to Previous
Brands Burnt Corded Corn Heap Kindleth Lit Olive Olives Olive-Yard Oliveyards Orchards Philistines Released Shocks Standing Stems Torches Uncut Vineyard Vineyards
Jump to Next
Brands Burnt Corded Corn Heap Kindleth Lit Olive Olives Olive-Yard Oliveyards Orchards Philistines Released Shocks Standing Stems Torches Uncut Vineyard Vineyards
Links
Judges 15:5 NIV
Judges 15:5 NLT
Judges 15:5 ESV
Judges 15:5 NASB
Judges 15:5 KJV

Judges 15:5 Bible Apps
Judges 15:5 Biblia Paralela
Judges 15:5 Chinese Bible
Judges 15:5 French Bible
Judges 15:5 German Bible

Alphabetical: along and both burned burning fire foxes grain groves had He in into let lit loose of olive Philistines released set shocks standing the thus to together torches up vineyards When with

OT History: Judges 15:5 When he had set the brands (Jd Judg. Jdg) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Judges 15:4
Top of Page
Top of Page