Genesis 31:4
New International Version
So Jacob sent word to Rachel and Leah to come out to the fields where his flocks were.

New Living Translation
So Jacob called Rachel and Leah out to the field where he was watching his flock.

English Standard Version
So Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah into the field where his flock was

Berean Study Bible
So Jacob sent word and called Rachel and Leah to the field where his flocks were,

New American Standard Bible
So Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to his flock in the field,

New King James Version
So Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field, to his flock,

King James Bible
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field unto his flock,

Christian Standard Bible
Jacob had Rachel and Leah called to the field where his flocks were.

Contemporary English Version
Jacob sent for Rachel and Leah to meet him in the pasture where he kept his sheep,

Good News Translation
So Jacob sent word to Rachel and Leah to meet him in the field where his flocks were.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Jacob had Rachel and Leah called to the field where his flocks were.

International Standard Version
Jacob sent for Rachel and Leah to come out to the field where his flock was

NET Bible
So Jacob sent a message for Rachel and Leah to come to the field where his flocks were.

New Heart English Bible
Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field to his flock,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
So Jacob sent a message to Rachel and Leah to come out to the open country where his flocks were.

JPS Tanakh 1917
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field unto his flock,

New American Standard 1977
So Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to his flock in the field,

Jubilee Bible 2000
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field unto his sheep

King James 2000 Bible
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field unto his flock,

American King James Version
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field to his flock,

American Standard Version
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field unto his flock,

Brenton Septuagint Translation
And Jacob sent and called Lea and Rachel to the plain where the flocks were.

Douay-Rheims Bible
He sent, and called Rachel and Lia into the field, where he fed the flocks,

Darby Bible Translation
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the fields to his flock,

English Revised Version
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field unto his flock,

Webster's Bible Translation
And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah into the field to his flock,

World English Bible
Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field to his flock,

Young's Literal Translation
And Jacob sendeth and calleth for Rachel and for Leah to the field unto his flock;
Study Bible
Jacob Flees from Laban
3Then the LORD said to Jacob, “Go back to the land of your fathers and to your kindred, and I will be with you.” 4So Jacob sent word and called Rachel and Leah to the field where his flocks were, 5and he told them, “I can see from your father’s countenance that his attitude toward me has changed; but the God of my father has been with me.…
Cross References
Genesis 31:3
Then the LORD said to Jacob, "Go back to the land of your fathers and to your kindred, and I will be with you."

Genesis 31:5
and he told them, "I can see from your father's face that his attitude toward me has changed; but the God of my father has been with me.

Treasury of Scripture

And Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah to the field to his flock,







Lexicon
So Jacob
יַעֲקֹ֔ב (ya·‘ă·qōḇ)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3290: Jacob -- a son of Isaac, also his desc

sent word
וַיִּשְׁלַ֣ח (way·yiš·laḥ)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7971: To send away, for, out

and called
וַיִּקְרָ֖א (way·yiq·rā)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7121: To call, proclaim, read

Rachel
לְרָחֵ֣ל (lə·rā·ḥêl)
Preposition-l | Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7354: Rachel -- a wife of Jacob

and Leah
וּלְלֵאָ֑ה (ū·lə·lê·’āh)
Conjunctive waw, Preposition-l | Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3812: Leah -- 'weary', a wife of Jacob

to the field
הַשָּׂדֶ֖ה (haś·śā·ḏeh)
Article | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7704: Field, land

where his flocks were,
צֹאנֽוֹ׃ (ṣō·nōw)
Noun - feminine singular construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 6629: Small cattle, sheep and goats, flock
(4) Jacob sent and called Rachel and Leah . . . --Rachel is placed first, as the chief wife. The field was probably the pasture where Laban's flocks fed, as they were specially under Jacob's charge; and there, in the open ground, the three would run no risk of having their conversation overheard. Jacob's speech to his wives consists of three parts: first, he tells them of the change in Laban's manner towards him, and his consequent fear of violence; he next justifies his own conduct towards their father, and accuses him of repeated injustice; finally, he announces to them that he had received the Divine command to return to Canaan. As regards the second point, Jacob had undoubtedly used stratagems to increase his wages, and of this his wives must have been well aware. On the other hand, we learn that Laban had openly violated the terms of the bargain; and, whereas all the parti-coloured kids and lambs were to belong to Jacob, no sooner did they increase beyond expectation, than Laban, first, would give him only the speckled, the most common kind, and finally, only the ring-straked, which were the most rare. Of course Jacob would keep all the sheep and goats which he had once made over to the charge of his sons; it would be the additions to them from Laban's flocks which were thus diminished.

As regards the vision, it has been thought that Jacob has compressed two occurrences into one narrative; but for insufficient reasons. It was at the breeding-time (Genesis 31:10) that Jacob saw the vision, with its two-fold lesson: the first, that the multiplication of his wages had been God's gift, and not the result of his own artifices; the second, that this bestowal of wealth was to enable him to return to Canaan. His wives heartily concurred in his purpose, but it was not till the time of sheep-shearing came (Genesis 31:19) that he effected his escape. But there is no difficulty in this delay. How large the household of Jacob had become we learn from the greatness of the present he selected for Esau (Genesis 32:13-15), and it could not be removed without preparation. The servants and camels must be gathered in from their trading expeditions, tents must be got ready, and camels' furniture and other requisites obtained; finally, they could not start until the ewes were fit for their journey, and only at a time of year when there would be herbage for the cattle on the march. We find that when they reached the Jabbok, Jacob's flocks and herds were "giving suck" (Genesis 33:13 in the Heb.); but it is not easy to calculate the interval between this and the time when they commenced their journey.

Verse 4. - And Jacob went - being unwilling to approach the house lest Laban should discover his design (Rosenmüller) - and called Rachel and Leah - Rachel may be placed first as the beloved wife of Jacob (Wordsworth, Lange), scarcely as the principal wife in comparison with Leah, who was adventitia (Rosenmüller; cf. ver. 14) - to the field unto his flock. The expression "his flock" indicates that Jacob had abandoned Laban's sheep and taken possession of those which belonged to himself - probably in preparation for his departure. 31:1-21 The affairs of these families are related very minutely, while (what are called) the great events of states and kingdoms at that period, are not mentioned. The Bible teaches people the common duties of life, how to serve God, how to enjoy the blessings he bestows, and to do good in the various stations and duties of life. Selfish men consider themselves robbed of all that goes past them, and covetousness will even swallow up natural affection. Men's overvaluing worldly wealth is that error which is the root of covetousness, envy, and all evil. The men of the world stand in each other's way, and every one seems to be taking away from the rest; hence discontent, envy, and discord. But there are possessions that will suffice for all; happy they who seek them in the first place. In all our removals we should have respect to the command and promise of God. If He be with us, we need not fear. The perils which surround us are so many, that nothing else can really encourage our hearts. To remember favoured seasons of communion with God, is very refreshing when in difficulties; and we should often recollect our vows, that we fail not to fulfil them.
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