1 Timothy 5:23
New International Version
Stop drinking only water, and use a little wine because of your stomach and your frequent illnesses.

New Living Translation
Don't drink only water. You ought to drink a little wine for the sake of your stomach because you are sick so often.

English Standard Version
(No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent ailments.)

Berean Study Bible
Stop drinking only water and use a little wine instead, because of your stomach and your frequent ailments.

Berean Literal Bible
No longer drink only water, but use a little wine, because of the stomach and your frequent ailments.

New American Standard Bible
No longer drink water exclusively, but use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent ailments.

King James Bible
Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.

Christian Standard Bible
Don't continue drinking only water, but use a little wine because of your stomach and your frequent illnesses.

Contemporary English Version
Stop drinking only water. Take a little wine to help your stomach trouble and the other illnesses you often have.

Good News Translation
Do not drink water only, but take a little wine to help your digestion, since you are sick so often.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Don't continue drinking only water, but use a little wine because of your stomach and your frequent illnesses.

International Standard Version
Stop drinking only water, but use a little wine for your stomach because of your frequent illnesses.

NET Bible
(Stop drinking just water, but use a little wine for your digestion and your frequent illnesses.)

New Heart English Bible
Be no longer a drinker of water only, but use a little wine for your stomach's sake and your frequent infirmities.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Do not drink water from now on, but drink a little wine because of your stomach and because of your chronic illness.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Stop drinking only water. Instead, drink a little wine for your stomach because you are frequently sick.

New American Standard 1977
No longer drink water exclusively, but use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent ailments.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.

King James 2000 Bible
Drink no longer water only, but use a little wine for your stomach's sake and your frequent illnesses.

American King James Version
Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for your stomach's sake and your often infirmities.

American Standard Version
Be no longer a drinker of water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Do not still drink water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake, and thy frequent infirmities.

Darby Bible Translation
Drink no longer only water, but use a little wine on account of thy stomach and thy frequent illnesses.

English Revised Version
Be no longer a drinker of water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.

Webster's Bible Translation
Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake, and thy frequent infirmities.

Weymouth New Testament


World English Bible
Be no longer a drinker of water only, but use a little wine for your stomach's sake and your frequent infirmities.

Young's Literal Translation
no longer be drinking water, but a little wine be using, because of thy stomach and of thine often infirmities;
Study Bible
A Charge to Timothy
22Do not be too quick in the laying on of hands and thereby share in the sins of others. Keep yourself pure. 23Stop drinking only water and use a little wine instead, because of your stomach and your frequent ailments. 24The sins of some men are obvious, going ahead of them to judgment; but the sins of others do not surface until later.…
Cross References
Acts 18:5
And when Silas and Timothy came down from Macedonia, Paul devoted himself fully to the word, testifying to the Jews that Jesus is the Christ.

1 Timothy 3:8
Deacons likewise must be dignified, not double-tongued or given to much wine or greedy for money.

Treasury of Scripture

Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for your stomach's sake and your often infirmities.

1 Timothy 3:3
Not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous;

1 Timothy 4:4
For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving:

Leviticus 10:9-11
Do not drink wine nor strong drink, thou, nor thy sons with thee, when ye go into the tabernacle of the congregation, lest ye die: it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations: …







Lexicon
Stop drinking [only] water
ὑδροπότει (hydropotei)
Verb - Present Imperative Active - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 5202: From a compound of hudor and a derivative of pino; to be a water-drinker, i.e. To abstain from vinous beverages.

[and] use
χρῶ (chrō)
Verb - Present Imperative Middle or Passive - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 5530: To use, make use of, deal with, take advantage of.

a little
ὀλίγῳ (oligō)
Adjective - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3641: Puny; especially neuter somewhat.

wine
οἴνῳ (oinō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3631: Wine. A primary word (yayin); 'wine'.

instead,
ἀλλὰ (alla)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 235: But, except, however. Neuter plural of allos; properly, other things, i.e. contrariwise.

because of
διὰ (dia)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

[your]
τὸν (ton)
Article - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

stomach
στόμαχον (stomachon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4751: The stomach. From stoma; an orifice, i.e., the 'stomach'.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

your
σου (sou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

frequent
πυκνάς (pyknas)
Adjective - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 4437: Frequent, often, much. From the same as skenopoios; clasped, i.e. frequent; neuter plural frequently.

ailments.
ἀσθενείας (astheneias)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 769: From asthenes; feebleness; by implication, malady; morally, frailty.
(23) Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.--Those who argue that this Epistle was the artificial composition of an age subsequent to St. Paul's, and was written in great measure to support the hierarchical development, which, they say, showed itself only in the century after St. Paul's death, have no little difficulty in accounting for the presence of such a command as this. It can, in fact, only be explained on the supposition that the letter was, in truth, written by St. Paul to Timothy in all freedom and in all love: by the older and more experienced, to the younger and comparatively untried man: by the master to the pupil: by an old and trusted friend, accustomed to speak his whole mind, to one his inferior in years, in rank, in knowledge. No ecclesiastical forger of the second or third century would have dreamed, or, had he dreamed, would have dared to weave into the complicated tapestry of such an Epistle such a charge as "Drink no longer water, but use a little wine--considering thine often infirmities."

The reminder was, no doubt, suggested by St. Paul's own words, with which he closed his solemn direction respecting Timothy's dealings with the accused presbyters, and the care to be used in the laying on of hands: "Keep thyself pure." That Timothy possessed--as did his master Paul--a feeble body, is clear from the words "thine often infirmities." He was, above all things, considering his great position in that growing church, to remember "to keep himself pure," but not on that account to observe ascetical abstinence, and so to weaken uselessly the frail, perishable, perhaps ever dying body, in which he must work that great work committed to him in the master's church. Abstinence from wine was a well-known characteristic feature of the Essene and other Jewish ascetic sects. We know there was frequent intercommunion between Alexandria and Ephesus (see Acts 18:24); and it has even been conjectured that Apollos, who taught publicly at Ephesus, was himself a famous Essene teacher. The practice of these grave and ascetic Jews, many of whom became Christians, no doubt affected not a little the habits and tone of thought of the Ephesian congregations. Hence the necessity of St. Paul's warning against allowing the bodily power to be weakened through abstinence and extreme asceticism.

Verse 23. - Be no longer a drinker of for drink no longer, A.V. Be... a drinker of water (ὑδροπότει); here only in the New Testament. It is found in some codices of the LXX. in Daniel 1:12, and also in classical Greek. We learn from hence the interesting fact that Timothy was, in modern parlance, a total abstainer; and we also learn that, in St. Paul's judgment, total abstinence was not to be adhered to if injurious to the health. The epithet, "a little," should not be overlooked. Was Luke, the beloved physician, with St. Paul when he wrote this prescription (see 2 Timothy 4:11)? It is also interesting to have this passing allusion to Timothy's bad health, and this instance of St. Paul's thoughtful consideration for him. Infirmities (ἀσθενείας); in the sense of sicknesses, attacks of illness. 5:17-25 Care must be taken that ministers are maintained. And those who are laborious in this work are worthy of double honour and esteem. It is their just due, as much as the reward of the labourer. The apostle charges Timothy solemnly to guard against partiality. We have great need to watch at all times, that we do not partake of other men's sins. Keep thyself pure, not only from doing the like thyself, but from countenancing it, or any way helping to it in others. The apostle also charges Timothy to take care of his health. As we are not to make our bodies masters, so neither slaves; but to use them so that they may be most helpful to us in the service of God. There are secret, and there are open sins: some men's sins are open before-hand, and going before unto judgment; some they follow after. God will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and make known the counsels of all hearts. Looking forward to the judgment-day, let us all attend to our proper offices, whether in higher or lower stations, studying that the name and doctrine of God may never be blasphemed on our account.
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Alphabetical: a ailments and because but drink drinking exclusively for frequent illnesses little longer No of only sake stomach Stop the use water wine your

NT Letters: 1 Timothy 5:23 Be no longer a drinker of water (1 Tim. 1Ti iTi 1tim i Tm) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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