Job 19:17
Parallel Verses
New International Version
My breath is offensive to my wife; I am loathsome to my own family.

New Living Translation
My breath is repulsive to my wife. I am rejected by my own family.

English Standard Version
My breath is strange to my wife, and I am a stench to the children of my own mother.

New American Standard Bible
"My breath is offensive to my wife, And I am loathsome to my own brothers.

King James Bible
My breath is strange to my wife, though I intreated for the children's sake of mine own body.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
My breath is offensive to my wife, and my own family finds me repulsive.

International Standard Version
My wife says my breath stinks; even my children say I smell bad!

NET Bible
My breath is repulsive to my wife; I am loathsome to my brothers.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
My breath offends my wife. I stink to my own children.

Jubilee Bible 2000
My spirit came to be strange to my wife, although I intreated her for the sons of my own body.

King James 2000 Bible
My breath is repulsive to my wife, though I make supplication for the children of my own body.

American King James Version
My breath is strange to my wife, though I entreated for the children's sake of my own body.

American Standard Version
My breath is strange to my wife, And my supplication to the children of mine own mother.

Douay-Rheims Bible
My wife hath abhorred my breath, and I entreated the children of my womb.

Darby Bible Translation
My breath is strange to my wife, and my entreaties to the children of my [mother's] womb.

English Revised Version
My breath is strange to my wife, and my supplication to the children of my mother's womb.

Webster's Bible Translation
My breath is strange to my wife, though I entreated for the children's sake of my own body.

World English Bible
My breath is offensive to my wife. I am loathsome to the children of my own mother.

Young's Literal Translation
My spirit is strange to my wife, And my favours to the sons of my mother's womb.
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

19:8-22 How doleful are Job's complaints! What is the fire of hell but the wrath of God! Seared consciences will feel it hereafter, but do not fear it now: enlightened consciences fear it now, but shall not feel it hereafter. It is a very common mistake to think that those whom God afflicts he treats as his enemies. Every creature is that to us which God makes it to be; yet this does not excuse Job's relations and friends. How uncertain is the friendship of men! but if God be our Friend, he will not fail us in time of need. What little reason we have to indulge the body, which, after all our care, is consumed by diseases it has in itself. Job recommends himself to the compassion of his friends, and justly blames their harshness. It is very distressing to one who loves God, to be bereaved at once of outward comfort and of inward consolation; yet if this, and more, come upon a believer, it does not weaken the proof of his being a child of God and heir of glory.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 17. - My breath is strange to my wife. The breath of a sufferer from elephantiasis has often a fetid odour which is extremely disagreeable. Job's wife, it would seem, held aloof from him on this account, so that he lost the tender offices which a wife is the fittest person to render. Though I intreated for the children's sake of mine own body. This translation is scarcely tenable, though no doubt it gives to the words used a most touching and pathetic sense. Translate, and I am loathsome to the children of my mother's wench; i.e. to my brothers and sisters (comp. Job 42:11). It would seem that they also avoided Job's presence, or at any rate any near approach to him. Under the circumstances, this is perhaps not surprising; but Job, in his extreme isolation, felt it keenly.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

My breath is strange to my wife,.... Being corrupt and unsavoury, through some internal disorder; see Job 17:1; so that she could not bear to come nigh him, to do any kind deed for him; but if this was his case, and his natural breath was so foul, his friends would not have been able to have been so long in the same room with him, and carry on so long a conversation with him; rather therefore it may signify the words of his mouth, his speech along with his breath, which were very disagreeable to his wife; when upon her soliciting him to curse God and die, he told her she talked like one of the foolish women; and when he taught her to expect evil as well as good at the hand of God, and to bear afflictions patiently, or else the sense may be, "my spirit" (f), his vital spirit, his life, was wearisome and loathsome to his wife; she was tired out with him, with hearing his continual groans and complaints, and wished to be rid of him, and that God would take away his life: or else, as some render it, "my spirit is strange to me, because of my wife" (g); and then the meaning is, that Job was weary of his own life, he loathed it, and could have been glad to have it taken from him, because of the scoffs and jeers of his wife at him, her brawls and quarrels with him, and solicitations of him to curse God and renounce religion:

though I entreated her for the children's sake of mine own body; this clause creates a difficulty with interpreters, since it is generally thought all Job's children were dead. Some think that only his elder children were destroyed at once, and that he had younger ones at home with him, which he here refers to; but this does not appear: others suppose these were children of his concubines; but this wants proof that he had any concubine; and besides an entreaty for the sake of such children could have no influence upon his proper wife: others take them for grandchildren, and who, indeed, are sometimes called children; but then they could not with strict propriety be called the children of his body; and for the same reason it cannot be meant of such that were brought up in his house, as if they were his children; nor such as were his disciples, or attended on him for instruction: but this may respect not any children then living, but those he had had; and the sense is, that Job entreated his wife, not for the use of the marriage bed, as some suggest (h); for it can hardly be thought, that, in such circumstances in which he was, there should be any desire of this kind; but to do some kind deed for him, as the dressing of his ulcers, &c. or such things which none but a wife could do well for him; and this he entreated for the sake of the children he had had by her, those pledges of their conjugal affection; or rather, since the word has the signification of deploring, lamenting, and bemoaning, the clause may be thus rendered, "and I lamented the children of my body" (i); he had none of those indeed to afflict him; and his affliction was, that they were taken away from him at once in such a violent manner; and therefore he puts in this among his family trials; or this may be an aggravation of his wife's want of tenderness and respect unto him; that his breath should be unsavoury, his talk disagreeable, and his sighs and moans be wearisome to her, when the burden of his song, the subject of his sorrowful complaints, was the loss of his children; in which it might have been thought she would have joined with him, being equally concerned therein.

(f) "spiritus meus", Junius & Tremellius, Vatablus, Schmidt, Schultens; "anima mea", Cocceius. (g) "propter uxorem meam", Schmidt. (h) R. Levi Ben Gersom; so some in Vatablus. (i) "deploro", Cocceius; "et miserans lugeo", Schmidt; "et miseret me", Michaelis; "comploro", Schultens.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

17. strange—His breath by elephantiasis had become so strongly altered and offensive, that his wife turned away as estranged from him (Job 19:13; 17:1).

children's … of mine own body—literally, "belly." But "loins" is what we should expect, not "belly" (womb), which applies to the woman. The "mine" forbids it being taken of his wife. Besides their children were dead. In Job 3:10 the same words "my womb" mean, my mother's womb: therefore translate, "and I must entreat (as a suppliant) the children of my mother's womb"; that is, my own brothers—a heightening of force, as compared with last clause of Job 19:16 [Umbreit]. Not only must I entreat suppliantly my servant, but my own brothers (Ps 69:8). Here too, he unconsciously foreshadows Jesus Christ (Joh 7:5).

Job 19:17 Additional Commentaries
Context
Job: My Redeemer Lives
16"I call to my servant, but he does not answer; I have to implore him with my mouth. 17"My breath is offensive to my wife, And I am loathsome to my own brothers. 18"Even young children despise me; I rise up and they speak against me.…
Cross References
Job 19:16
I summon my servant, but he does not answer, though I beg him with my own mouth.

Job 19:18
Even the little boys scorn me; when I appear, they ridicule me.
Treasury of Scripture

My breath is strange to my wife, though I entreated for the children's sake of my own body.

breath

Job 2:9,10 Then said his wife to him, Do you still retain your integrity? curse …

Job 17:1 My breath is corrupt, my days are extinct, the graves are ready for me.

body. Heb. belly

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