John 12:27
New International Version
"Now my soul is troubled, and what shall I say? 'Father, save me from this hour'? No, it was for this very reason I came to this hour.

New Living Translation
"Now my soul is deeply troubled. Should I pray, 'Father, save me from this hour'? But this is the very reason I came!

English Standard Version
“Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? But for this purpose I have come to this hour.

Berean Study Bible
Now My soul is troubled, and what shall I say? ‘Father, save Me from this hour’? No, it is for this purpose that I have come to this hour.

Berean Literal Bible
Now My soul has been troubled, and what shall I say? 'Father, save Me from this hour'? But on account of this I came to this hour.

New American Standard Bible
"Now My soul has become troubled; and what shall I say, 'Father, save Me from this hour '? But for this purpose I came to this hour.

King James Bible
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour.

Christian Standard Bible
"Now my soul is troubled. What should I say--Father, save me from this hour? But that is why I came to this hour.

Contemporary English Version
Now I am deeply troubled, and I don't know what to say. But I must not ask my Father to keep me from this time of suffering. In fact, I came into the world to suffer.

Good News Translation
"Now my heart is troubled--and what shall I say? Shall I say, 'Father, do not let this hour come upon me'? But that is why I came--so that I might go through this hour of suffering.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
"Now My soul is troubled. What should I say--Father, save Me from this hour? But that is why I came to this hour.

International Standard Version
"Now my soul is in turmoil, and what should I say—'Father, save me from this hour'? No! It was for this very reason that I came to this hour.

NET Bible
"Now my soul is greatly distressed. And what should I say? 'Father, deliver me from this hour'? No, but for this very reason I have come to this hour.

New Heart English Bible
"Now my soul is troubled. And what should I say? 'Father, save me from this hour?' But for this cause I came to this hour.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
“Behold, now my soul is troubled, and what shall I say: My Father, deliver me from this hour? But for this I have come to this hour.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"I am too deeply troubled now to know how to express my feelings. Should I say, 'Father, save me from this time [of suffering]'? No! I came for this time of suffering.

New American Standard 1977
“Now My soul has become troubled; and what shall I say, ‘Father, save Me from this hour’? But for this purpose I came to this hour.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour, but for this have I come in this hour.

King James 2000 Bible
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour.

American King James Version
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I to this hour.

American Standard Version
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this cause came I unto this hour.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this cause I came unto this hour.

Darby Bible Translation
Now is my soul troubled, and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But on account of this have I come to this hour.

English Revised Version
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this cause came I unto this hour.

Webster's Bible Translation
Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause I came to this hour.

Weymouth New Testament
Now is my soul full of trouble; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour. But for this purpose I have come to this hour.

World English Bible
"Now my soul is troubled. What shall I say? 'Father, save me from this time?' But for this cause I came to this time.

Young's Literal Translation
'Now hath my soul been troubled, and what? shall I say -- Father, save me from this hour? -- but because of this I came to this hour;
Study Bible
Jesus Predicts His Death
26If anyone serves Me, he must follow Me; and where I am, My servant will be as well. If anyone serves Me, the Father will honor him. 27Now My soul is troubled, and what shall I say? ‘Father, save Me from this hour’? No, it is for this purpose that I have come to this hour. 28Father, glorify Your name!” Then a voice came from heaven: “I have glorified it, and I will glorify it again.”…
Cross References
Psalm 6:3
My soul is deeply distressed. How long, O LORD, how long?

Matthew 11:25
At that time Jesus declared, "I praise You, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because You have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children.

Matthew 11:26
Yes, Father, for this was well-pleasing in Your sight.

Matthew 26:38
Then He said to them, "My soul is consumed with sorrow to the point of death. Stay here and keep watch with Me."

Matthew 26:45
Then He returned to the disciples and said, "Are you still sleeping and resting? Look, the hour is near, and the Son of Man is betrayed into the hands of sinners.

Mark 14:34
And He told them, "My soul is consumed with sorrow to the point of death. Stay here and keep watch."

John 11:33
When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come with her also weeping, He was deeply moved in spirit and troubled.

John 12:23
But Jesus replied, "The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified.

Treasury of Scripture

Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I to this hour.

is.

John 11:33-35
When Jesus therefore saw her weeping, and the Jews also weeping which came with her, he groaned in the spirit, and was troubled, …

John 13:21
When Jesus had thus said, he was troubled in spirit, and testified, and said, Verily, verily, I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me.

Psalm 69:1-3
To the chief Musician upon Shoshannim, A Psalm of David. Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto my soul…

what.

Isaiah 38:15
What shall I say? he hath both spoken unto me, and himself hath done it: I shall go softly all my years in the bitterness of my soul.

Luke 12:49,50
I am come to send fire on the earth; and what will I, if it be already kindled? …

Father.

John 11:41
Then they took away the stone from the place where the dead was laid. And Jesus lifted up his eyes, and said, Father, I thank thee that thou hast heard me.

Matthew 26:53,54
Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels? …

but.

John 18:37
Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice.

Luke 22:53
When I was daily with you in the temple, ye stretched forth no hands against me: but this is your hour, and the power of darkness.

1 Timothy 1:15
This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief.







Lexicon
Now
Νῦν (Nyn)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3568: A primary particle of present time; 'now'; also as noun or adjective present or immediate.

My
μου (mou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

soul
ψυχή (psychē)
Noun - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 5590: From psucho; breath, i.e. spirit, abstractly or concretely.

is troubled,
τετάρακται (tetaraktai)
Verb - Perfect Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 5015: To disturb, agitate, stir up, trouble. Of uncertain affinity; to stir or agitate.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

what
τί (ti)
Interrogative / Indefinite Pronoun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 5101: Who, which, what, why. Probably emphatic of tis; an interrogative pronoun, who, which or what.

shall I say?
εἴπω (eipō)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Active - 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2036: Answer, bid, bring word, command. A primary verb; to speak or say.

‘Father,
Πάτερ (Pater)
Noun - Vocative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3962: Father, (Heavenly) Father, ancestor, elder, senior. Apparently a primary word; a 'father'.

save
σῶσόν (sōson)
Verb - Aorist Imperative Active - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 4982: To save, heal, preserve, rescue. From a primary sos; to save, i.e. Deliver or protect.

Me
με (me)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Accusative 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

from
ἐκ (ek)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1537: From out, out from among, from, suggesting from the interior outwards. A primary preposition denoting origin, from, out.

this
ταύτης (tautēs)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3778: This; he, she, it.

hour’?
ὥρας (hōras)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 5610: Apparently a primary word; an 'hour'.

No,
ἀλλὰ (alla)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 235: But, except, however. Neuter plural of allos; properly, other things, i.e. contrariwise.

it is for this purpose
διὰ (dia)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

that I have come
ἦλθον (ēlthon)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2064: To come, go.

to
εἰς (eis)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1519: A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.

this
ταύτην (tautēn)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3778: This; he, she, it.

hour.
ὥραν (hōran)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 5610: Apparently a primary word; an 'hour'.
(27) Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say?--The word rendered "soul" is the same word as that rendered "life" in John 12:25. (Comp. especially Matthew 16:25-26.) It is the seat of the natural feelings and emotions, and, as the fatal hour approaches, our Lord is in that region of His human life troubled. There is a real shrinking from the darkness of the death which is at hand. The conflict exists but for a moment, but in all its fearfulness is real, and then the cup of the world's woe is seized and drunk to its bitter dregs. Men have sometimes wondered that St. John passes over the agony of the garden of Gethsemane, but the agony of Gethsemane is here, and the very words of Matthew 26:39 are echoed. Men have wondered, too, that in the life of the Son of man a struggle such as this could have had even a moment's place. Not a few, indeed, would at any cost read the words otherwise. But they cannot be read otherwise, either on the written page or in the hearts of men. That troubled soul asked, "What shall I say?" Blessed reality! In that struggle humanity struggled, and in that victory humanity won.

Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour.--It is uncertain whether the first words of this sentence are a prayer, or whether they should be read as a question. In the latter case the meaning would be, "What shall I say? Shall I say, Father save Me from this hour? But no: for this cause came I unto this hour. I cannot shrink back or seek to be delivered from it." As a prayer the meaning would be--"Father, save Me from this hour; but for this cause, that I may be saved from it, came I unto this hour. The moment of agony is the moment of victory."

The real difficulty of the verse lies in the words "for this cause," for which a meaning must be sought in the context. No interpretation of them is free from objection, but that which seems to have, upon the whole most probability, understands them as referring to the words which follow, and reads the clause, "Father, glorify Thy name," as part of this verse. The sense of the whole passage would therefore be, "Father, save Me from this hour; but Thy will, not Mine, be done; for this cause came I unto this hour, that Thy name be glorified; Father, glorify Thy name." (Comp. Note on Luke 12:49-50.)

Verses 27-30. -

(2) The anticipation of Gethsemane. Verse 27. - Now, at this moment, has been and yet is my soul troubled ("concurrebat horror morris et ardor obedientisa," Bengel). In John 11:33 we hear that he troubled himself, and shuddered wrathfully in his "spirit" (πνεύμετι) at the contemplation of all the evils and curse of death; now his whole ψυχή, i.e. his life centered in its corporeal environment as a man, the self which the Son of God had taken up into the Divine essence, was in depth of agony, preluding the strong crying and tears to which Hebrews 5:7 refers. These perturbations of his soul and spirit can only be accounted for by the uniqueness of his Personality, the capacity for suffering, and the extent to which he was identifying himself with the sinful nature with which he had invested himself. Sin is the sting of death. He had by the nature of his incarnation become sin for us. Martyrs, freed from sin, delivered from its curse and shame and power through him, face it with calmness and hope; but there was infinite space in his breast for all the curse of it to rain its horrible tempest. He felt that the hour of his extremest travail had come upon him. And what shall I (must I) say? What is the regal passion of my heart? What is the right revelation for me to make to you? What is the prayer for me to offer to the Father? It remains a great question whether the next utterance is the primary answer of the question itself, or whether it continues the interrogation - whether, i.e., the Lord lifts up for a moment the cry of heart-rending grief, Father, save me from this hour! or whether he said, Shall I say, Father, save me from this hour? The first view supposes in the first place actual uncertainty and awful bewilderment, and then a most intense cry (Hebrews 5:7) to him who was able to save him from death. Save me either from the death itself, or from the fear and horror which accompanies it (Lucke, Meyer, Hengstenberg, and Moulton). It need not be a prayer to leave the world unsaved, to sacrifice all the work on which he had come. We are told by the apostle (Hebrews 5:7) that he was "heard" (ἀπὸ τῆς εὐλαβείας) and delivered from human weakness which might have rebelled in the intolerable darkness of that hour. Father, save me from this hour; the equivalent to the prayer, "If it be possible, let this cup pass from me," with its grand "nevertheless," etc. If this be its meaning, we have a scene nearly, if not closely, identifiable with the agony of the garden. The correction which immediately follows augments the comparison with the scene in Gethsemane recorded by the synoptists. The R.T. and Revised Version have put their note of interrogation after ταύτης into the margin, and not into the text. Ewald, Lange, Kling, Tholuck, Lachmann, accept this punctuation, and Godet regards it as an hypothetical prayer, although he does not place the interrogation after ταύτης. The self-interrogation of the previous utterance at least reveals the presence of such a desire, but one which vanishes as the mysterious hour engulfs and wraps him round. If this be the true interpretation, then the clause that follows must be, Nay this I cannot say, for on account of this very conflict - for this cause - only to fight this great battle - I came steadily forward to this hour. I cannot pray to escape from it. If, however, we have the expression of an actual though momentary prayer, and if we give it the meaning, "bring me safely through and out of this hour," it corresponds with the Divine trust in the Father's love which, in the extremity of the anguish and desertion, he yet reveals, and the ἀλλά becomes equivalent to "Pray, this I need not say; the end is known" (Westcott). I know that I shall be delivered, for this cause, viz. that I should encounter and pass through the hour I came into the world, and have reached the final crisis. This is, to my mind, more satisfactory; the interrogative prayer gives a sentimental character to the utterance out of harmony with the theme. Godet thinks that the fact that, according to the synoptists, our Lord in the garden did actually offer the prayer which he here hesitates to present, is evidence of the historic character of both accounts. I differ from him, because the sublime answer to the prayer here given would seem to preclude the necessity of the final conflict. The circumstance that he did offer the prayer as interpreted above, a prayer which was veritably heard, is in harmony with the narrative of the agony. 12:27-33 The sin of our souls was the troubled of Christ's soul, when he undertook to redeem and save us, and to make his soul an offering for our sin. Christ was willing to suffer, yet prayed to be saved from suffering. Prayer against trouble may well agree with patience under it, and submission to the will of God in it. Our Lord Jesus undertook to satisfy God's injured honour, and he did it by humbling himself. The voice of the Father from heaven, which had declared him to be his beloved Son, at his baptism, and when he was transfigured, was heard proclaiming that He had both glorified his name, and would glorify it. Christ, reconciling the world to God by the merit of his death, broke the power of death, and cast out Satan as a destroyer. Christ, bringing the world to God by the doctrine of his cross, broke the power of sin, and cast out Satan as a deceiver. The soul that was at a distance from Christ, is brought to love him and trust him. Jesus was now going to heaven, and he would draw men's hearts to him thither. There is power in the death of Christ to draw souls to him. We have heard from the gospel that which exalts free grace, and we have heard also that which enjoins duty; we must from the heart embrace both, and not separate them.
Jump to Previous
Account Cause Full Heart Hour Purpose Reason Save Soul Time Trouble Troubled
Jump to Next
Account Cause Full Heart Hour Purpose Reason Save Soul Time Trouble Troubled
Links
John 12:27 NIV
John 12:27 NLT
John 12:27 ESV
John 12:27 NASB
John 12:27 KJV

John 12:27 Bible Apps
John 12:27 Biblia Paralela
John 12:27 Chinese Bible
John 12:27 French Bible
John 12:27 German Bible

Alphabetical: and become But came Father for from has heart hour hour' I is it me my No Now purpose reason save say shall soul this to troubled very was what

NT Gospels: John 12:27 Now my soul is troubled (Jhn Jo Jn) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
John 12:26
Top of Page
Top of Page