Herod
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Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary
Herod

son of a hero

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Herod

(hero-like). This family though of Idumean origin and thus alien by race, was Jewish in faith. I. HEROD THE GREAT was the second son of Antipater, an Idumean, who was appointed procurator of Judea by Julius Caesar, B.C. 47. Immediately after his father's elevation when only fifteen years old, he received the government of Galilee and shortly afterward that of Coele-Syria. Though Josephus says he was 15 years old at this time, it is generally conceded that there must be some mistake, as he lived to be 69 or 70 years old, and died B.C. 4; hence he must have been 25 years old at this time.--ED.) In B.C. 41 he was appointed by Antony tetrarch of Judea. Forced to abandon Judea the following year, he fled to Rome, and received the appointment of king of Judea. In the course of a few years, by the help of the Romans he took Jerusalem (B.C. 37), and completely established his authority throughout his dominions. The terrible acts of bloodshed which Herod perpetrated in his own family were accompanied by others among his subjects equally terrible, from the number who fell victims to them. According to the well-known story) he ordered the nobles whom he had called to him in his last moment to be executed immediately after his decease, that so at least his death might be attended by universal mourning. It was at the time of his fatal illness that he must have caused the slaughter of the infants at Bethlehem. (Matthew 2:16-18) He adorned Jerusalem with many splendid monuments of his taste and magnificence. The temple, which he built with scrupulous care, was the greatest of these works. The restoration was begun B.C. 20, and the temple itself was completed in a year and a half. But fresh additions were constantly made in succeeding years, so that it was said that the temple was "built in forty and six years," (John 2:20) the work continued long after Herod's death. (Herod died of a terrible disease at Jericho, in April, B.C. 4, at the age of 69, after a long reign of 37 years.--ED.) II. HEROD ANTIPAS, ANTIPAS was the son of Herod the Great by Malthake, a Samaritan. He first married a daughter of Aretas, "king of Arabia Petraea," but afterward Herodias, the wife of his half-brother, Herod Philip. Aretas, indignant at the insult offered to his daughter, found a pretext for invading the territory of Herod, and defeated him with great loss. This defeat, according to the famous passage in Josephus, was attributed by many to the murder of John the Baptist, which had been committed by Antipas shortly before, under the influence of Herodias. (Matthew 14:4) ff.; Mark 6:17 ff.; Luke 3:19 At a later time the ambition of Herodias proved the cause of her husband's ruin. She urged him to go to Rome to gain the title of king, cf. (Mark 6:14) but he was opposed at the court of Caligula by the emissaries of Agrippa, and condemned to perpetual banishment at Lugdunum, A.D. 39. Herodias voluntarily shared his punishment, and he died in exile. Pilate took occasion from our Lord's residence in Galilee to bend him for examination, (Luke 23:6) ff., to Herod Antipas, who came up to Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover. The city of Tiberias, which Antipas founded and named in honor of the emperor, was the most conspicuous monument of his long reign. III. HEROD PHILIP I. (Philip,) (Mark 6:17) was the son of Herod the Great and Mariamne. He married Herodias the sister of Agrippa I by whom he had a daughter, Salome. He was excluded from all share in his father's possessions in consequence of his mother's treachery, and lived afterward in a private station. IV. HEROD PHILIP II. was the son of Herod the Great and Cleopatra. He received as his own government Batanea Trachonitis, Auramtis (Gaulanitis), and some parts about Jamnia, with the title of tetrarch. Luke 3:1. He built a new city on the site of Paneas, near the sources of the Jordan, which be called Caesarea Philippi, (Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27) and raised Bethsaida to the rank of a city under the title of Julias and died there A.D. 34. He married Salome, the daughter of Herod Philip I. and Herodias. V. HEROD AGRIPPA I. was the son of Aristobulus and Berenice, and grandson of Herod the Great. He was brought up at Rome, and was thrown into prison by Tiberius, where he remained till the accession of Caligula, who made him king, first of the tetrarchy of Philip and Lysanias; afterward the dominions of Antipas were added, and finally Judea and Samaria. Unlike his predessors, Agrippa was a strict observer of the law, and he sought with success the favor of the Jews. It is probable that it was with this view he put to death James the son of Zebedee, and further imprisoned Peter. (Acts 12:1) ff. But his sudden death interrupted his ambitious projects. (Acts 12:21,23) VI. HEROD AGRIPPA II --was the son of Herod Agrippa I. In A.D. 62 the emperor gave him the tetrarches formerly held by Philip and Lysanias, with the title of king. (Acts 25:13) The relation in which he stood to his sister Berenice, (Acts 25:13) was the cause of grave suspicion. It was before him that Paul was tried. (Acts 26:28)

ATS Bible Dictionary
Herod

The name of four princes, Idumaeans by descent, who governed either the whole or a part of Judea, under the Romans, and are mentioned in the New Testament.

1.HEROD THE GREAT, Matthew 2:1-23 Luke 1:5. He was the son of Antipater, an Idumaean, who was in high favor with Julius Caesar. At the age of fifteen years, Herod was constituted by his father procurator of Galilee under Hyrcanus II, who was then at the head of the Jewish nation; while his brother Phasael was intrusted with the same authority over Judea. In these stations they were afterwards confirmed by Antony, with the title of tetrarch, about the year 41 B. C. The power of Hyrcanus had always been opposed by his brother Aristobulus; and now Antigonus, the son of the latter, continued in hostility to Herod, and was assisted by the Jews. At first he was unsuccessful, and was driven by Herod out of the country; but having obtained the aid of the Parthians, he at length succeeded in defeating Herod, and acquired possession of the whole of Judea, about the year 40 B. C. Herod meanwhile fled to Rome; and being there declared king of Judea through the exertions of Antony, he collected an army, vanquished Antigonus, recovered Jerusalem, and extirpated all the family of the Maccabees, B. C. 37. After the battle of Actium, in which his patron Antony was defeated, Herod joined the party of Octavius, and was confirmed by him in all his possessions. He endeavored to conciliate the affections of the Jews, by rebuilding and decorating the temple, (see TEMPLE,) and by founding or enlarging many cities and towns; but the prejudices of the nation against a foreign yoke were only heightened when he introduced quinquennial games in honor of Caesar, and erected theatres and gymnasia at Jerusalem. The cruelty of his disposition also was such as ever to render him odious. He put to death his own wife Mariamne, with her two sons Alexander and Aristobulus; and when he himself was at the point of death, he caused a number of the most illustrious of his subjects to be thrown into prison at Jericho, and exacted from his sister a promise that they should be murdered the moment he expired, in order, as he said, that tears should be shed at the death of Herod. This promise, however, was not fulfilled. His son Antipater was executed for conspiring to poison his father; and five days after, Herod died, A. D. 2, aged sixty-eight, having reigned as king about thirty-seven years. It was during his reign that Jesus was born at Bethlehem; and Herod, in consequence of his suspicious temper, and in order to destroy Jesus, gave orders for the destruction of all the children of two years old and under in the place, Matthew 2:1-23. This is also mentioned by Macrobius. After the death of Herod, half of his kingdom, including Judea, Ideumaea, and Samaria, was given to his son Archelaus, with the title of Ethnarch; while the remaining half was divided between two of his other sons, Herod Antipas and Philip, with the title of Tetrarchs; the former having the regions of Galilee and Perea, and the latter Batanea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis.

2.HEROD PHILIP. See PHILP.

3.HEROD ANTIPAS, Luke 3:1, was the son of Herod the Great by Malthace his Samaritan wife, and own brother to Archelaus, along with whom he was educated at Rome. After the death of his father, he was appointed by Augustus to be tetrarch of Galilee and Perea, that is, the southern part of the country east of the Jordan, Luke 3:1, whence also the general appellation of king is sometimes given to him, Mark 6:14. The Savior, as a Galilean, was under his jurisdiction, Luke 23:6-12. He first married a daughter of Aretas, and Arabian king; but afterwards becoming enamoured of Herodias, the wife of his brother Herod Philip, and his own niece, he dismissed his former wife, and induced Herodias to leave her husband and connect herself with him. At her instigation he afterwards went to Rome to ask for the dignity and title of the king; but being there accused before Caligula, at the instance of Herod Agrippa, his nephew and the brother of Herodias, he was banished to Lugdunum (now Lyons) in Gaul, about A. D. 41, and the provinces which he governed were given to Herod Agrippa. It was Herod Antipas who caused John the Baptist to be beheaded, Matthew 14:1-12 Mark 6:14-29. He also appears to have been a follower, or at least a favorer, of the sect of the Sadducees, Mark 8:15. Compare Matthew 16:6. See HERODIANS.

4. HEROD AGRIPPA MAJOR or I, Acts 12...1-25; 23.35, was the grandson of Herod the Great and Mariamne, the son of the Aristobulus who was put to death with his mother, by the orders of his father. (See above, HEROD I.) On the accession of Caligula to the imperial throne, Agrippa was taken from prison, where he had been confined by Tiberius, and received from the emperor, A. D. 38, the title of king, together with the provinces which had belonged to his uncle Philip the tetrarch Lysanias. (See ABILENE.) He was afterwards confirmed in the possession of these by Claudius, who also annexed to is kingdom all those parts of Judea and Samaria which had formerly belonged to his grandfather Herod, A. D. 43. In order to ingratiate himself with the Jews, he commenced a persecution against the Christians; but seems to have proceeded no further than to put to death James, and to imprison Peter, since he soon after died suddenly and miserably at Cesarea, A. D. 44, Acts 12:1-25. He is mentioned by Josephus only under the name of Agrippa.

5. HEROD AGRIPPA MINOR or II, Acts 25:1-26:32, was the son of Herod Agrippa I, and was educated at Rome, under the care of the emperor Claudius. On the death of his father, when he was seventeen years old, instead of causing him to succeed to his father's kingdom of Chalcis, which had belonged to his Uncle Herod. He was afterwards transferred (A. D. 53) from Chalcis, with the title of king, to the government of those provinces which his father at first possessed, namely, Batanea, Trachonitis, Auranitis, and Abilene, to which several other cities were afterwards added. He is mentioned in the New Testament and by Josephus only by the name of Agrippa. It was before him that St. Paul was brought by Festus, Acts 25:13 26:32. He died on the third year of Trajan's reign, at the age of seventy years.

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Herod Agrippa I.

Son of Aristobulus and Bernice, and grandson of Herod the Great. He was made tetrarch of the provinces formerly held by Lysanias II., and ultimately possessed the entire kingdom of his grandfather, Herod the Great, with the title of king. He put the apostle James the elder to death, and cast Peter into prison (Luke 3:1; Acts 12:1-19). On the second day of a festival held in honour of the emperor Claudius, he appeared in the great theatre of Caesarea. "The king came in clothed in magnificent robes, of which silver was the costly brilliant material. It was early in the day, and the sun's rays fell on the king, so that the eyes of the beholders were dazzled with the brightness which surrounded him. Voices here and there from the crowd exclaimed that it was the apparition of something divine. And when he spoke and made an oration to them, they gave a shout, saying, 'It is the voice of a god, and not of a man.' But in the midst of this idolatrous ostentation an angel of God suddenly smote him. He was carried out of the theatre a dying man." He died (A.D. 44) of the same loathsome malady which slew his grandfather (Acts 12:21-23), in the fifty-fourth year of his age, having reigned four years as tetrarch and three as king over the whole of Palestine. After his death his kingdom came under the control of the prefect of Syria, and Palestine was now fully incorporated with the empire.

Herod Antipas

Herod's son by Malthace (Matthew 14:1; Luke 3:1, 19; 9:7; Acts 13:1). (see ANTIPAS.)

Herod Archelaus

(Matthew 2:22), the brother of Antipas (q.v.).

Herod Arippa II.

The son of Herod Agrippa I. and Cypros. The emperor Claudius made him tetrarch of the provinces of Philip and Lysanias, with the title of king (Acts 25:13; 26:2, 7). He enlarged the city of Caesarea Philippi, and called it Neronias, in honour of Nero. It was before him and his sister that Paul made his defence at Caesarea (Acts 25:12-27). He died at Rome A.D. 100, in the third year of the emperor Trajan.

Herod Philip I.

(Mark 6:17), the son of Herod the Great by Mariamne, the daughter of Simon, the high priest. He is distinguished from another Philip called "the tetrarch." He lived at Rome as a private person with his wife Herodias and his daughter Salome.

Herod Philip II.

The son of Herod the Great and Cleopatra of Jerusalem. He was "tetrarch" of Batanea, Iturea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis. He rebuilt the city of Caesarea Philippi, calling it by his own name to distinguish it from the Caesarea on the sea-coast which was the seat of the Roman government. He married Salome, the daughter of Herodias (Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27; Luke 3:1).

Herod the Great

(Matthew 2:1-22; Luke 1:5; Acts 23:35), the son of Antipater, an Idumaean, and Cypros, an Arabian of noble descent. In the year B.C. 47 Julius Caesar made Antipater, a "wily Idumaean," procurator of Judea, who divided his territories between his four sons, Galilee falling to the lot of Herod, who was afterwards appointed tetrarch of Judea by Mark Antony (B.C. 40), and also king of Judea by the Roman senate.

He was of a stern and cruel disposition. "He was brutish and a stranger to all humanity." Alarmed by the tidings of one "born King of the Jews," he sent forth and "slew all the children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the coasts thereof, from two years old and under" (Matthew 2:16). He was fond of splendour, and lavished great sums in rebuilding and adorning the cities of his empire. He rebuilt the city of Caesarea (q.v.) on the coast, and also the city of Samaria (q.v.), which he called Sebaste, in honour of Augustus. He restored the ruined temple of Jerusalem, a work which was begun B.C. 20, but was not finished till after Herod's death, probably not till about A.D. 50 (John 2:20). After a troubled reign of thirty-seven years, he died at Jericho amid great agonies both of body and mind, B.C. 4, i.e., according to the common chronology, in the year in which Jesus was born.

After his death his kingdom was divided among three of his sons. Of these, Philip had the land east of Jordan, between Caesarea Philippi and Bethabara, Antipas had Galilee and Peraea, while Archelaus had Judea and Samaria.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HEROD

her'-ud: The name Herod (Herodes) is a familiar one in the history of the Jews and of the early Christian church. The name itself signifies "heroic," a name not wholly applicable to the family, which was characterized by craft and knavery rather than by heroism. The fortunes of the Herodiam family are inseparably connected with the last flickerings of the flame of Judaism, as a national power, before it was forever extinguished in the great Jewish war of rebellion, 70 A.D. The history of the Herodian family is not lacking in elements of greatness, but whatever these elements were and in whomsoever found, they were in every ease dimmed by the insufferable egotism which disfigured the family, root and branch. Some of the Herodian princes were undeniably talented; but these talents, wrongly used, left no marks for the good of the people of Israel. Of nearly all the kings of the house of Herod it may truly be said that at their death "they went without being desired," unmissed, unmourned. The entire family history is one of incessant brawls, suspicion, intrigue arid shocking immorality. In the baleful and waning light of the rule of the Herodians, Christ lived and died, and under it the foundations of the Christian church were laid. 1 Corinthians 11:19 m; Galatians 5:20 margin, where it is shown to interfere with that unity of faith and community of interests that belong to Christians. There being but one standard of truth, and one goal for all Christian life, any arbitrary choice varying from what was common to all believers, becomes an inconsistency and a sin to be warned against. Ellicott, on Galatians 5:20, correctly defines "heresies" (King James Version, the English Revised Version) as "a more aggravated form of dichostasia" (the American Standard Revised Version "parties") "when the divisions have developed into distinct and organized parties"; so also 1 Corinthians 11:19, translated by the Revised Version (British and American) "factions." In 2 Peter 2:1, the transition toward the subsequent ecclesiastical sense can be traced. The "destructive heresies" (Revised Version margin, the English Revised Version margin "sects of perdition") are those guilty of errors both of doctrine and of life very fully described throughout the entire chapter, and who, in such course, separated themselves from the fellowship of the church.

1. The Family Descent:

The Herodians were not of Jewish stock. Herod the Great encouraged the circulation of the legend of the family descent from an illustrious Babylonian Jew (Ant., XIV, i, 3), but it has no historic basis. It is true the Idumeans were at that time nominal Jews, since they were subdued by John Hyrcanus in 125 B.C., and embodied in the Asmonean kingdom through an enforced circumcision, but the old national antagonism remained (Genesis 27:41). The Herodian family sprang from Antipas (died 78 B.C.), who was appointed governor of Idumaea by Alexander Janneus. His son Antipater, who succeeded him, possessed al the cunning, resourcefulness and unbridled ambition of his son Herod the Great. He had an open eye for two things-the unconquerable strength of the Roman power and the pitiable weakness of the decadent Asmonean house, and on these two factors he built the house of his hopes. He craftily chose the side of Hyrcanus II in his internecine war with Aristobulus his brother (69 B.C.), and induced him to seek the aid of the Romans. Together they supported the claims of Pompey and, after the latter's defeat, they availed themselves of the magnanimity of Caesar to submit to him, after the crushing defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus (48 B.C.). As a reward, Antipater received the procuratorship of Judea (47 B.C.), while his innocent dupe Hyrcanus had to satisfy himself with the high-priesthood. Antipater died by the hand of an assassin (43 B.C.) and left four sons, Phasael, Herod the Great, Joseph, Pheroras, and a daughter Salome. The second of these sons raised the family to its highest pinnacle of power and glory. Pheroras was nominally his co-regent ann, possessed of his father's cunning, maintained himself to the end, surviving his cruel brother, but he cuts a small figure in the family history. He, as well as his sister Salome, proved an endless source of trouble to Herod by the endless family brawls which they occasioned.

2. Herod the Great:

With a different environment and with a different character, Herod the Great might have been worthy of the surname which he now bears only as a tribute of inane flattery. What we know of him, we owe, in the main, to the exhaustive treatment of the subject by Josephus in his Antiquities and Jewish War, and from Strabo and Dio Cassius among the classics. We may subsume our little sketch of Herod's life under the heads of (1) political activity, (2) evidences of talent, and (3) character and domestic life.

(1) Political Activity.

Antipater had great ambitions for his son. Herod was only a young man when he began his career as governor of Galilee. Josephus' statement, however, that he was only "fifteen years old" (Ant., XIV, ix, 2) is evidently the mistake of some transcriber, because we are told (XVII, viii, 1) that "he continued his life till a very old age." That was 42 years later, so that Herod at this time must have been at least 25 years old. His activity and success in ridding his dominion of dangerous bands of freebooters, and his still greater success in raising the always welcome tribute-money for the Roman government, gained for him additional power at court. His advance became rapid. Antony appointed him "tetrarch" of Judea in 41 B.C., and although he was forced by circumstances temporarily to leave his domain in the hands of the Parthians and of Antigonus, this, in the end, proved a blessing in disguise. In this final spasm of the dying Asmonean house, Antigonus took Jerusalem by storm, and Phasael, Herod's oldest brother, fell into his hands. The latter was governor of the city, and foreseeing his fate, he committed suicide by dashing out his brains against the walls of his prison. Antigonus incapacitated his brother Hyrcanus, who was captured at the same time, from ever holding the holy office again by cropping off his ears (Ant., XIV, xiii, 10). Meanwhile, Herod was at Rome, and through the favor of Antony and Augustus he obtained the crown of Judea in 37 B.C. The fond ambition of his heart was now attained, although he had literally to carve out his own empire with the sword. He made quick work of the task, cut his way back into Judea and took Jerusalem by storm in 37 B.C.

The first act of his reign was the extermination of the Asmonean house, to which Herod himself was related through his marriage with Mariamne, the grandchild of Hyrcanus. Antigonus was slain and with him 45 of his chief adherents. Hyrcanus was recalled from Babylon, to which he had been banished by Antigonus, but the high-priesthood was bestowed on Aristobulus, Herod's brother-in-law, who, however, soon fell a victim to the suspicion and fear of the king (Ant., XV, iii, 3). These outrages against the purest blood in Judea turned the love of Mariamne, once cherished for Herod, into a bitter hatred. The Jews, loyal to the dynasty of the Maccabees, accused Herod before the Roman court, but he was summarily acquitted by Antony. Hyrcanus, mutilated and helpless as he was, soon followed Aristobulus in the way of death, 31 B.C. (Ant., XV, vi, 1). When Antony, who had ever befriended Herod, was conquered by Augustus at Actium (31 B.C.), Herod quickly turned to the powers that were, and, by subtle flattery and timely support, won the imperial favor. The boundaries of his kingdom were now extended by Rome. And Herod proved equal to the greater task. By a decisive victory over the Arabians, he showed, as he had done in his earlier Galilean government, what manner of man he was, when aroused to action. The Arabians were wholly crushed, and submitted themselves unconditionally under the power of Herod (Ant., XV, v, 5). Afraid to leave a remnant of the Asmonean power alive, he sacrificed Mariamne his wife, the only human being he ever seems to have loved (28 B.C.), his mother-in-law Alexandra (Ant., XV, vii, 8), and ultimately, shortly before his death, even his own sons by Mariamne, Alexander and Aristobulus 7 B.C. (Ant., XVI, xi, 7). In his emulation of the habits and views of life of the Romans, he continually offended and defied his Jewish subjects, by the introduction of Roman sports and heathen temples in his dominion. His influence on the younger Jews in this regard was baneful, and slowly a distinct partly arose, partly political, partly religious, which called itself the Herodian party, Jews in outward religious forms but Gentiles in their dress and in their whole view of life. They were a bitter offense to the rest of the nation, but were associated with the Pharisees and Sadducees in their opposition to Christ (Matthew 22:16 Mark 3:6; Mark 12:13). In vain Herod tried to win over the Jews, by royal charity in time of famine, and by yielding, wherever possible, to their bitter prejudices. They saw in him only a usurper of the throne of David, maintained by the strong arm of the hated Roman oppressor. Innumerable plots were made against his life, but, with almost superhuman cunning, Herod defeated them all (Ant., XV, viii). He robbed his own people that he might give munificent gifts to the Romans; he did not even spare the grave of King David, which was held in almost idolatrous reverence by the people, but robbed it of its treasures (Ant., XVI, vii, 1). The last days of Herod were embittered by endless court intrigues and conspiracies, by an almost insane suspicion on the part of the aged king, and by increasing indications of the restlessness of the nation. Like Augustus himself, Herod was the victim of an incurable and loathsome disease. His temper became more irritable, as the malady made progress, and he made both himself and his court unutterably miserable. The picture drawn by Josephus (Ant., XVII) is lifelike and tragic in its vividness. In his last will and testament, he remained true to his life-long fawning upon the Roman power (Ant., XVII, vi, 1). So great became his suffering toward the last that he made a fruitless attempt at suicide. But, true to his character, one of the last acts of his life was an order to execute his son Antipater, who had instigated the murder of his halfbrothers, Alexander and Aristobulus, and another order to slay, after his death, a number of nobles, who were guilty of a small outbreak at Jerusalem and who were confined in the hippodrome (Ant., XVI, vi, 5). He died in the 37th year of his reign, 34 years after he had captured Jerusalem and slain Antigonus. Josephus writes this epitaph: "A man he was of great barbarity toward all men equally, and a slave to his passions, but above the consideration of what was right. Yet was he favored by fortune as much as any man ever was, for from a private man he became a king, and though he were encompassed by ten thousand dangers, he got clear of them all and continued his life to a very old age" (Ant., XVII, viii, 1).

(2) Evidences of Talent.

The life of Herod the Great was not a fortuitous chain of favorable accidents. He was unquestionably a man of talent. In a family like that of Antipus and Antipater, talent must necessarily be hereditary, and Herod inherited it more largely than any of his brothers. His whole life exhibits in no small degree statecraft, power of organization, shrewdness. He knew men and he knew how to use them. He won the warmest friendship of Roman emperors, and had a faculty of convincing the Romans of the righteousness of his cause, in every contingency. In his own dominions he was like Ishmael, his hand against all, and the hands of all against him, and yet he maintained himself in the government for a whole generation. His Galilean governorship showed what manner of man he was, a man with iron determination and great generalship. His Judean conquest proved the same thing, as did his Arabian war. Herod was a born leader of men. Under a different environment he might have developed into a truly great man, and had his character been coordinate with his gifts, he might have done great things for the Jewish people. But by far the greatest talent of Herod was his singular architectural taste and ability. Here he reminds one of the old Egyptian Pharaohs. Against the laws of Judaism, which he pretended to obey, he built at Jerusalem a magnificent theater and an amphitheater, of which the ruins remain. The one was within the city, the other outside the walls. Thus he introduced into the ascetic sphere of the Jewish life the frivolous spirit of the Greeks and the Romans. To offset this cruel infraction of all the maxims of orthodox Judaism, he tried to placate the nation by rebuilding the temple of Zerubbabel and making it more magnificent than even Solomon's temple had been. This work was accomplished somewhere between 19 B.C. and 11 or 9 B.C., although the entire work was not finished till the procuratorship of Albinus, 62-64 A.D. (Ant., XV, xi, 5, 6; XX, ix, 7; John 2:20). It was so transcendently beautiful that it ranked among the world's wonders, and Josephus does not tire of describing its glories (BJ, V, v). Even Titus sought to spare the building in the final attack on the city (BJ, VI, iv, 3). Besides this, Herod rebuilt and beautified Struto's Tower, which he called after the emperor, Caesarea. He spent 12 years in this gigantic work, building a theater and amphitheater, and above all in achieving the apparently impossible by creating a harbor where there was none before. This was accomplished by constructing a gigantic mole far out into the sea, and so enduring was the work that the remains of it are seen today. The Romans were so appreciative of the work done by Herod that they made Caesarea the capital of the new regime, after the passing away of the Herodian power. Besides this, Herod rebuilt Samaria, to the utter disgust of the Jews, calling it Sebaste. In Jerusalem itself he built the three great towers, Antonia, Phasaelus and Mariamne, which survived even the catastrophe of the year 70 A.D. All over Herod's dominion were found the evidences of this constructive passion. Antipatris was built by him, on the site of the ancient Kapharsaba, as well as the stronghold Phasaelus near Jericho, where he was destined to see so much suffering and ultimately to die. He even reached beyond his own domain to satisfy this building mania at Ascalon, Damascus, Tyre and Sidon, Tripoli, Ptolemais, nay even at Athens and Lacedaemon. But the universal character of these operations itself occasioned the bitterest hatred against him on the part of the narrowminded Jews.

(3) Characteristics and Domestic Life.

The personality of Herod was impressive, and he was possessed of great physical strength. His intellectual powers were far beyond the ordinary; his will was indomitable; he was possessed of great tact, when he saw fit to employ it; in the great crises of his life he was never at a loss what to do; and no one has ever accused Herod the Great of cowardice. There were in him two distinct individualities, as was the case with Nero. Two powers struggled in him for the mastery, and the lower one at last gained complete control. During the first part of his reign there were evidences of large-heartedness, of great possibilities in the man. But the bitter experiences of his life, the endless whisperings and warnings of his court, the irreconcilable spirit of the Jews, as well as the consciousness of his own wrongdoing, changed him into a Jewish Nero: a tyrant, who bathed his own house and his own people in blood. The demons of Herod's life were jealousy of power, and suspicion, its necessary companion.

He was the incarnation of brute lust, which in turn became the burden of the lives of his children. History tells of few more immoral families than the house of Herod, which by intermarriage of its members so entangled the genealogical tree as to make it a veritable puzzle. As these marriages were nearly all within the line of forbidden consanguinity, under the Jewish law, they still further embittered the people of Israel against the Herodian family. When Herod came to the throne of Judea, Phasael was dead. Joseph his younger brother had fallen in battle (Ant., XIV, xv, 10), and only Pheroras and Salome survived. The first, as we have seen, nominally shared the government with Herod, but was of little consequence and only proved a thorn in the king's flesh by his endless interference and plotting. To him were allotted the revenues of the East Jordanic territory. Salome, his sister, was ever neck-deep in the intrigues of the Herodian family, but had the cunning of a fox and succeeded in making Herod believe in her unchangeable loyalty, although the king had killed her own son-in-law and her nephew, Aristobulus, his own son. The will of Herod, made shortly before his death, is a convincing proof of his regard for his sister (Ant., XVII, viii, 1).

His domestic relations were very unhappy. Of his marriage with Doris and of her son, Antipater, he reaped only misery, the son, as stated above, ultimately falling a victim to his father's wrath, when the crown, for which he plotted, was practically within his grasp. Herod appears to have been deeply in love with Mariamne, the grandchild of Hyrcanus, in so far as he was capable of such a feeling, but his attitude toward the entire Asmonean family and his fixed determination to make an end of it changed whatever love Mariamne had for him into hatred. Ultimately she, as well as her two sons, fell victims to Herod's insane jealousy of power. Like Nero, however, in a similar situation, Herod felt the keenest remorse after her death. As his sons grew up, the family tragedy thickened, and the court of Herod became a veritable hotbed of mutual recriminations, intrigues and catastrophes. The trials and executions of his own conspiring sons were conducted with the acquiescence of the Roman power, for Herod was shrewd enough not to make a move without it. Yet so thoroughly was the condition of the Jewish court understood at Rome, that Augustus, after the death of Mariamne's sons (7 B.C.), is said to have exclaimed: "I would rather be Herod's hog hus than his son huios." At the time of his death, the remaining sons were these: Herod, son of Mariamne, Simon's daughter; Archelaus and Antipas, sons of Malthace, and Herod Philip, son of Cleopatra of Jerusalem. Alexander and Aristobulus were killed, through the persistent intrigues of Antipater, the oldest son and heir presumptive to the crown, and he himself fell into the grave he had dug for his brothers.

By the final testament of Herod, as ratified by Rome, the kingdom was divided as follows: Archelaus received one-half of the kingdom, with the title of king, really "ethnarch," governing Judea, Samaria and Idumaea; Antipas was appointed "tetrarch" of Galilee and Peraea; Philip, "tetrarch" of Trachonitis, Gaulonitis and Paneas. To Salome, his intriguing sister, he bequeathed Jamnia, Ashdod and Phasaelus, together with 500,000 drachmas of coined silver. All his kindred were liberally provided for in his will, "so as to leave them all in a wealthy condition" (Ant., XVII, viii, 1). In his death he had been better to his family than in his life. He died unmourned and unbeloved by his own people, to pass into history as a name soiled by violence and blood. As the waters of Callirhoe were unable to cleanse his corrupting body, those of time were unable to wash away the stains of a tyrant's name. The only time he is mentioned in the New Testament is in Matthew 2 and Luke 1. In Matthew he is associated with the wise men of the East, who came to investigate the birth of the "king of the Jews." Learning their secret, Herod found out from the "priests and scribes of the people" where the Christ was to be born and ordered the "massacre of the innocents," with which his name is perhaps more generally associated than with any other act of his life. As Herod died in 4 B.C. and some time elapsed between the massacre and his death (Matthew 2:19), we have here a clue to the approximate fixing of the true date of Christ's birth. Another, in this same connection, is an eclipse of the moon, the only one mentioned by Josephus (Ant., XVII, vi, 4; text and note), which was seen shortly before Herod's death. This eclipse occurred on March 13, in the year of the Julian Period, 4710, therefore 4 B.C.

3. Herod Antipas:

Herod Antipas was the son of Herod the Great and Malthace, a Samaritan woman. Half Idumean, half Samaritan, he had therefore not a drop of Jewish blood in his veins, and "Galilee of the Gentiles" seemed a fit dominion for such a prince. He ruled as "tetrarch" of Galilee and Peraea (Luke 3:1) from 4 B.C. till 39 A.D. The gospel picture we have of him is far from prepossessing. He is superstitious (Matthew 14:1 f), foxlike in his cunning (Luke 13:31 f) and wholly immoral. John the Baptist was brought into his life through an open rebuke of his gross immorality and defiance of the laws of Moses (Leviticus 18:16), and paid for his courage with his life (Matthew 14:10; Ant, XVIII, v, 2).

On the death of his father, although he was younger than his brother Archelaus (Ant., XVII, ix, 4; BJ, II, ii, 3), he contested the will of Herod, who had given to the other the major part of the dominion. Rome, however, sustained the will and assigned to him the "tetrarchy" of Galilee and Peraea, as it had been set apart for him by Herod (Ant., XVII, xi, 4). Educated at Rome with Archelaus and Philip, his half-brother, son of Mariamne, daughter of Simon, he imbibed many of the tastes and graces and far more of the vices of the Romans. His first wife was a daughter of Aretas, king of Arabia. But he sent her back to her father at Petra, for the sake of Herodias, the wife of his brother Philip, whom he had met and seduced at Rome. Since the latter was the daughter of Aristobulus, his half-brother, and therefore his niece, and at the same time the wife of another half-brother, the union between her and Antipas was doubly sinful. Aretas repaid this insult to his daughter by a destructive war (Ant., XVIII, v, 1). Herodias had a baneful influence over him and wholly dominated his life (Matthew 14:3-10). He emulated the example of his father in a mania for erecting buildings and beautifying cities. Thus, he built the wall of Sepphoris and made the place his capital. He elevated Bethsaida to the rank of a city and gave it the name "Julia," after the daughter of Tiberius. Another example of this inherited or cultivated building-mania was the work he did at Betharamphtha, which he called "Julias" (Ant., XVIII, ii, 1). His influence on his subjects was morally bad (Mark 8:15). If his life was less marked by enormities than his father's, it was only so by reason of its inevitable restrictions. The last glimpse the Gospels afford of him shows him to us in the final tragedy of the life of Christ. He is then at Jerusalem. Pilate in his perplexity had sent the Saviour bound to Herod, and the utter inefficiency and flippancy of the man is revealed in the account the Gospels give us of the incident (Luke 23:7-12 Acts 4:27). It served, however, to bridge the chasm of the enmity between Herod and Pilate (Luke 23:12), both of whom were to be stripped of their power and to die in shameful exile. When Caius Caligula had become emperor and when his scheming favorite Herod Agrippa I, the bitter enemy of Antipas, had been made king in 37 A.D., Herodias prevailed on Herod Antipas to accompany her to Rome to demand a similar favor. The machinations of Agrippa and the accusation of high treason preferred against him, however, proved his undoing, and he was banished to Lyons in Gaul, where he died in great misery (Ant., XVIII, vii, 2; BJ, II, ix, 6).

4. Herod Philip:

Herod Philip was the son of Herod the Great and Cleopatra of Jerusalem. At the death of his father he inherited Gaulonitis, Traehonitis and Paneas (Ant., XVII, viii, 1). He was Philip apparently utterly unlike the rest of the Herodian family, retiring, dignified, moderate and just. He was also wholly free from the intriguing spirit of his brothers, and it is but fair to suppose that he inherited this totally un-Herodian character and disposition from his mother. He died in the year 34 A.D., and his territory was given three years later to Agrippa I, his nephew and the son of Aristobulus, together with the tetrarchy of Lysanias (Ant., XVIII, iv, 6; XIX, v, 1).

5. Herod Archelaus:

Herod Archelaus was the oldest son of Herod the Great by Malthace, the Samaritan. He was a man of violent temper, reminding one a great deal of his father. Educated like all Archelaus the Herodian princes at Rome, he was fully familiar with the life and arbitrariness of the Roman court. In the last days of his father's life, Antipater, who evidently aimed at the extermination of all the heirs to the throne, accused him and Philip, his half-brother, of treason. Both were acquitted (Ant., XVI, iv, 4; XVII, vii, 1). By the will of his father, the greater part of the Herodian kingdom fell to his share, with the title of "ethnarch." The will was contested by his brother Antipas before the Roman court. While the matter was in abeyance, Archelaus incurred the hatred of the Jews by the forcible repression of a rebellion, in which some 3,000 people were slain. They therefore opposed his claims at Rome, but Arche1aus, in the face of all this opposition, received the Roman support (Ant., XVII, xi, 4). It is very ingeniously suggested that this episode may be the foundation of the parable of Christ, found in Luke 19:12-27. Archelaus, once invested with the government of Judea, ruled with a hard hand, so that Judea and Samaria were both soon in a chronic state of unrest. The two nations, bitterly as they hated each other, became friends in this common crisis, and sent an embassy to Rome to complain of the conduct of Archelaus, and this time they were successful. Archelaus was warned by a dream of the coming disaster, whereupon he went at once to Rome to defend himself, but wholly in vain. His government was taken from him, his possessions were all confiscated by the Roman power and he himself was banished to Vienna in Gaul (Ant., XVII, xiii, 2, 3). He, too, displayed some of his father's taste for architecture, in the building of a royal palace at Jericho and of a village, named after himself, Archelais. He was married first to Mariamne, and after his divorce from her to Glaphyra, who had been the wife of his half-brother Alexander (Ant., XVII, xiii). The only mention made of him in the Gospels is found in Matthew 2:22.

Of Herod, son of Herod the Great and Mariamne, Simon's daughter, we know nothing except that he married Herodias, the daughter of his dead halfbrother Aristobulus. He is called Philip in the New Testament (Matthew 14:3), and it was from him that Antipas lured Herodias away. His later history is wholly unknown, as well as that of Herod, the brother of Philip the tetrarch, and the oldest son of Herod the Great and Cleopatra of Jerusalem.

6. Herod Agrippa I:

Two members of the Herodian family are named Agrippa. They are of the line of Aristobulus, who through Mariamne, grand-daughter of Hyrcanus, carried down the line of the Asmonean blood. And it is worthy of note that in this line, nearly extinguished by Herod through his mad jealousy and fear of the Maccabean power, the kingdom of Herod came to its greatest glory again.

Herod Agrippa I, called Agrippa by Josephus, was the son of Aristobulus and Bernice and the grandson of Herod the Great and Mariamne. Educated at Rome with Claudius (Ant., XVIII, vi, 1, 4), he was possessed of great shrewdness and tact. Returning to Judea for a little while, he came back to Rome in 37 A.D. He hated his uncle Antipas and left no stone unturned to hurt his cause. His mind was far-seeing, and he cultivated, as his grandfather had done, every means that might lead to his own promotion. He, therefore, made fast friends with Caius Caligula, heir presumptive to the Roman throne, and his rather outspoken advocacy of the latter's claims led to his imprisonment by Tiberius. This proved the making of his fortune, for Caligula did not forget him, but immediately on his accession to the throne, liberated Agrippa and bestowed on him, who up to that time had been merely a private citizen, the "tetrarchies" of Philip, his uncle, and of Lysanias, with the title of king, although he did not come into the possession of the latter till two more years had gone by (Ant., XVIII, vi, 10). The foolish ambition of Herod Antipas led to his undoing, and the emperor, who had heeded the accusation of Agrippa against his uncle, bestowed on him the additional territory of Galilee and Peraea in 39 A.D. Agrippa kept in close touch with the imperial government, and when, on the assassination of Caligula, the imperial crown was offered to the indifferent Claudius, it fell to the lot of Agrippa to lead the latter to accept the proffered honor. This led to further imperial favors and further extension of his territory, Judea and Samaria being added to his domain, 40 A.D. The fondest dreams of Agrippa had now been realized, his father's fate was avenged and the old Herodian power had been restored to its original extent. He ruled with great munificence and was very tactful in his contact with the Jews. With this end in view, several years before, he had moved Caligula to recall the command of erecting an imperial statue in the city of Jerusalem; and when he was forced to take sides in the struggle between Judaism and the nascent Christian sect, he did not hesitate a moment, but assumed the role of its bitter persecutor, slaying James the apostle with the sword and harrying the church whenever possible (Acts 12.). He died, in the full flush of his power, of a death, which, in its harrowing details reminds us of the fate of his grandfather (Acts 12:20-23; Ant, XIX, viii, 2). Of the four children he left (BJ, II, xi, 6), three are known to history-Herod Agrippa II, king of Calchis, Bernice of immoral celebrity, who consorted with her own brother in defiance of human and Divine law, and became a byword even among the heathen (Juv. Sat. vi. 156-60), and Drusilla, the wife of the Roman governor Felix (Acts 24:24). According to tradition the latter perished in the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 A.D., together with her son Agrippa. With Herod Agrippa I, the Herodian power had virtually run its course.

7. Herod Agrippa II:

Herod Agrippa II was the son of Herod Agrippa I and Cypros. When his father died in 44 A.D. he was a youth of only 17 years and considered too young to assume the government of Judea. Claudius therefore placed the country under the care of a procurator. Agrippa had received a royal education in the palace of the emperor himself (Ant., XIX, ix, 2).

Read Complete Article...

Greek
2264. Herodes -- perhaps "son of a hero," Herod, the name of ...
... perhaps "son of a hero," Herod, the name of several kings of the Jews. Part of Speech:
Noun, Masculine Transliteration: Herodes Phonetic Spelling: (hay-ro'-dace ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/2264.htm - 6k

2265. Herodianoi -- Herodians, partisans of Herod
... Herodians, partisans of Herod. Part of Speech: Noun, Masculine Transliteration:
Herodianoi Phonetic Spelling: (hay-ro-dee-an-oy') Short Definition: the Herodians ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/2265.htm - 6k

2266. Herodias -- Herodias, granddaughter of Herod the Great
... Herodias, granddaughter of Herod the Great. Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine
Transliteration: Herodias Phonetic Spelling: (hay-ro-dee-as') Short Definition ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/2266.htm - 6k

745. Archelaos -- "people-ruling," Archelaus, a son of Herod the ...
... 744, 745. Archelaos. 746 . "people-ruling," Archelaus, a son of Herod
the Great and king of Judea, Samaria and Idumea. Part of ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/745.htm - 6k

986. Blastos -- Blastus, the chamberlain of Herod Agrippa I
... Blastus, the chamberlain of Herod Agrippa I. Part of Speech: Noun, Masculine
Transliteration: Blastos Phonetic Spelling: (blas'-tos) Short Definition: Blastus ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/986.htm - 6k

5529. Chouzas -- Chuza, an officer of Herod
... Chuza, an officer of Herod. Part of Speech: Noun, Masculine Transliteration: Chouzas
Phonetic Spelling: (khood-zas') Short Definition: Chuza Definition: Chuza ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/5529.htm - 5k

5376. Philippos -- "horse-loving," Philip, two sons of Herod the ...
... 5375, 5376. Philippos. 5377 . "horse-loving," Philip, two sons of Herod the
Great, also two Christians. Part of Speech: Noun, Masculine Transliteration ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/5376.htm - 7k

67. Agrippas -- Agrippa, the name of two descendant of Herod the ...
... Agrippa, the name of two descendant of Herod the Great. Part of Speech: Noun, Masculine
Transliteration: Agrippas Phonetic Spelling: (ag-rip'-pas) Short ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/67.htm - 6k

5529a. Chouzas -- Chuza, an officer of Herod
... 5529, 5529a. Chouzas. 5529b . Chuza, an officer of Herod. Transliteration:
Chouzas Short Definition: Chuza. Word Origin probably ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/5529a.htm - 5k

959. Bernike -- Berenice, Bernice, daughter of Herod Agrippa I
... Berenice, Bernice, daughter of Herod Agrippa I. Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine
Transliteration: Bernike Phonetic Spelling: (ber-nee'-kay) Short Definition ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/959.htm - 6k

Library

Herod and the Baptist.
... Book X. 21. Herod and the Baptist. The narrative of Matthew is as
follows,""for Herod had laid hold on John and bound him in the ...
/.../origen/origens commentary on the gospel of matthew/21 herod and the baptist.htm

Herod --A Startled Conscience
... HEROD"A STARTLED CONSCIENCE. 'But when Herod heard thereof, he said, It is
John, whom I:beheaded: he is risen from the dead.'"Mark 6:16. ...
/.../maclaren/expositions of holy scripture d/heroda startled conscience.htm

How Herod the Tetrarch was Banished.
... Containing The Interval Of Thirty-Two Years. From The Banishment Of Archelus To
The Departure From Babylon. CHAPTER 7. How Herod The Tetrarch Was Banished. ...
/.../josephus/the antiquities of the jews/chapter 7 how herod the.htm

Herod
... Strong Meat for Hungry Souls: The Gospel of St. Mark CHAPTER 6:14-29 HEROD. ... But Herod,
when he heard thereof, said, John, whom I beheaded, he is risen. ...
/.../christianbookshelf.org/chadwick/the gospel of st mark/chapter 6 14-29 herod.htm

A Law of Herod's About, Thieves. Salome and Pheroras
... From The Finishing Of The Temple By Herod To The Death Of Alexander And Aristobulus.
CHAPTER 1. A Law Of Herod's About, Thieves. Salome And Pheroras. ...
/.../josephus/the antiquities of the jews/chapter 1 a law of.htm

Concerning the Enmity Between Herod and Pheroras; How Herod Sent ...
... CHAPTER 3. Concerning The Enmity Between Herod And Pheroras; How Herod
Sent Antipater To Caesar; And Of The Death Of Pheroras. 1 ...
/.../josephus/the antiquities of the jews/chapter 3 concerning the enmity.htm

Jesus and Herod
... CHAPTER V. JESUS AND HEROD. Pilate had tried Jesus and found Him innocent;
and so he frankly told the members of the Sanhedrim, thereby ...
/.../stalker/the trial and death of jesus christ/chapter v jesus and herod.htm

When Herod is Rejected in Arabia, He Makes Haste to Rome Where ...
... CHAPTER 14. When Herod Is Rejected In Arabia, He Makes Haste To Rome Where
Antony And Caesar Join Their Interest To Make Him King . ...
/.../chapter 14 when herod is.htm

At that Time Herod the Tetrarch Heard of the Fame of Jesus...
... The Text of the Diatessaron. Section XVIII. At that time Herod the tetrarch
heard of the fame of Jesus´┐Ż [1] [1266] At that time ...
/.../hogg/the diatessaron of tatian/section xviii at that time.htm

How Herod Celebrated the Games that were to Return Every Fifth ...
... BOOK XVI. Containing The Interval Of Twelve Years. From The Finishing Of The
Temple By Herod To The Death Of Alexander And Aristobulus. ...
/.../josephus/the antiquities of the jews/chapter 5 how herod celebrated.htm

Thesaurus
Herod's (10 Occurrences)
... Int. Standard Bible Encyclopedia TEMPLE, HEROD'S. see TEMPLE. Multi-Version
Concordance Herod's (10 Occurrences). Matthew 2:15 ...
/h/herod's.htm - 9k

Herod (45 Occurrences)
... Easton's Bible Dictionary Herod Agrippa I. Son of Aristobulus and Bernice,
and grandson of Herod the Great. He ... empire. Herod Antipas. ...
/h/herod.htm - 57k

Herodias (7 Occurrences)
... While residing at Rome with her husband Herod Philip I. and her daughter, Herod
Antipas fell in with her during one of his journeys to that city. ...
/h/herodias.htm - 12k

Manaen (1 Occurrence)
... syntrophos; rendered in RV "foster brother" of) Herod, ie, Herod Antipas, the tetrach,
who, with his brother Archelaus, was educated at Rome. Int. ...
/m/manaen.htm - 8k

Birthday (4 Occurrences)
... among the Jews. On the occasion of Herod's birth-day John the Baptist was
beheaded (Matthew 14:6). Noah Webster's Dictionary. 1. (n ...
/b/birthday.htm - 11k

Tetrarch (5 Occurrences)
... ruler over the fourth part of a province; but the word denotes a ruler of a province
generally (Matthew 14:1; Luke 3:1, 19; 9:7; Acts 13:1). Herod and Phasael ...
/t/tetrarch.htm - 9k

Machaerus
... The Black Fortress, was built by Herod the Great in the gorge of Callirhoe, one
of the wadies 9 miles east of the Dead Sea, as a frontier rampart against Arab ...
/m/machaerus.htm - 9k

Hero'di-as (6 Occurrences)
... Matthew 14:3 For Herod having laid hold on John, did bind him, and did put him in
prison, because of Herodias his brother Philip's wife, (See RSV). ...
/h/hero'di-as.htm - 8k

Praetorium (8 Occurrences)
... 15:16 John 18:28, 33; John 19:9 (in all margins "palace," and in the last three
the King James Version "judgment hall"); Acts 23:35, (Herod's) "palace," margin ...
/p/praetorium.htm - 14k

Claudius (3 Occurrences)
... During the reign of this emperor, several persecutions of the Christians by the
Jews took place in the dominions of Herod Agrippa, in one of which the apostle ...
/c/claudius.htm - 15k

Bible Concordance
Herod (45 Occurrences)

Matthew 2:1 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of King Herod, behold, wise men from the east came to Jerusalem, saying,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:3 When King Herod heard it, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him.
(WEB KJV ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:7 Then Herod secretly called the wise men, and learned from them exactly what time the star appeared.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:12 Being warned in a dream that they shouldn't return to Herod, they went back to their own country another way.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:13 Now when they had departed, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream, saying, "Arise and take the young child and his mother, and flee into Egypt, and stay there until I tell you, for Herod will seek the young child to destroy him."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:15 and was there until the death of Herod; that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the Lord through the prophet, saying, "Out of Egypt I called my son."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:16 Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked by the wise men, was exceedingly angry, and sent out, and killed all the male children who were in Bethlehem and in all the surrounding countryside, from two years old and under, according to the exact time which he had learned from the wise men.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:19 But when Herod was dead, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared in a dream to Joseph in Egypt, saying,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 2:22 But when he heard that Archelaus was reigning over Judea in the place of his father, Herod, he was afraid to go there. Being warned in a dream, he withdrew into the region of Galilee,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 14:1 At that time, Herod the tetrarch heard the report concerning Jesus,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 14:3 For Herod had laid hold of John, and bound him, and put him in prison for the sake of Herodias, his brother Philip's wife.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Matthew 14:5 When he would have put him to death, he feared the multitude, because they counted him as a prophet.
(See NAS NIV)

Matthew 14:6 But when Herod's birthday came, the daughter of Herodias danced among them and pleased Herod.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:14 King Herod heard this, for his name had become known, and he said, "John the Baptizer has risen from the dead, and therefore these powers are at work in him."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:16 But Herod, when he heard this, said, "This is John, whom I beheaded. He has risen from the dead."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:17 For Herod himself had sent out and arrested John, and bound him in prison for the sake of Herodias, his brother Philip's wife, for he had married her.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:18 For John said to Herod, "It is not lawful for you to have your brother's wife."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:20 for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and kept him safe. When he heard him, he did many things, and he heard him gladly.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:21 Then a convenient day came, that Herod on his birthday made a supper for his nobles, the high officers, and the chief men of Galilee.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 6:22 When the daughter of Herodias herself came in and danced, she pleased Herod and those sitting with him. The king said to the young lady, "Ask me whatever you want, and I will give it to you."
(Root in WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Mark 8:15 He warned them, saying, "Take heed: beware of the yeast of the Pharisees and the yeast of Herod."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 1:5 There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the priestly division of Abijah. He had a wife of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 3:1 Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilene,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 3:19 but Herod the tetrarch, being reproved by him for Herodias, his brother's wife, and for all the evil things which Herod had done,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 3:20 added this also to them all, that he shut up John in prison.
(See NAS NIV)

Luke 8:3 and Joanna, the wife of Chuzas, Herod's steward; Susanna; and many others; who served them from their possessions.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 9:7 Now Herod the tetrarch heard of all that was done by him; and he was very perplexed, because it was said by some that John had risen from the dead,
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 9:9 Herod said, "John I beheaded, but who is this, about whom I hear such things?" He sought to see him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 13:31 On that same day, some Pharisees came, saying to him, "Get out of here, and go away, for Herod wants to kill you."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:7 When he found out that he was in Herod's jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who was also in Jerusalem during those days.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:8 Now when Herod saw Jesus, he was exceedingly glad, for he had wanted to see him for a long time, because he had heard many things about him. He hoped to see some miracle done by him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:11 Herod with his soldiers humiliated him and mocked him. Dressing him in luxurious clothing, they sent him back to Pilate.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:12 Herod and Pilate became friends with each other that very day, for before that they were enemies with each other.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Luke 23:15 Neither has Herod, for I sent you to him, and see, nothing worthy of death has been done by him.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 4:27 "For truly, in this city against your holy servant, Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles and the people of Israel, were gathered together
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 12:1 Now about that time, King Herod stretched out his hands to oppress some of the assembly.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 12:4 When he had arrested him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to four squads of four soldiers each to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.
(See NIV)

Acts 12:6 The same night when Herod was about to bring him out, Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains. Guards in front of the door kept the prison.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 12:11 When Peter had come to himself, he said, "Now I truly know that the Lord has sent out his angel and delivered me out of the hand of Herod, and from everything the Jewish people were expecting."
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 12:19 When Herod had sought for him, and didn't find him, he examined the guards, and commanded that they should be put to death. He went down from Judea to Caesarea, and stayed there.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 12:20 Now Herod was very angry with the people of Tyre and Sidon. They came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus, the king's personal aide, their friend, they asked for peace, because their country depended on the king's country for food.
(WEB KJV WEY WBS YLT RSV)

Acts 12:21 On an appointed day, Herod dressed himself in royal clothing, sat on the throne, and gave a speech to them.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 12:23 and presently there smote him a messenger of the Lord, because he did not give the glory to God, and having been eaten of worms, he expired.
(See NIV)

Acts 13:1 Now in the assembly that was at Antioch there were some prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon who was called Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen the foster brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Acts 23:35 "I will hear you fully when your accusers also arrive." He commanded that he be kept in Herod's palace.
(WEB KJV WEY ASV BBE DBY WBS YLT NAS RSV NIV)

Subtopics

Herod

Herod the Great

Herod: King of Judah (Herod the Great)

Herod: Son of Aristobulus (Herod Agrippa I)

Herod: Tetrarch of Galilee (Herod Antipas)

Herod: Tetrarch of Galilee (Herod Antipas): Beheads John the Baptist

Herod: Tetrarch of Galilee (Herod Antipas): Desires to See Jesus

Herod: Tetrarch of Galilee (Herod Antipas): Incest of

Herod: Tetrarch of Galilee (Herod Antipas): Jesus Tried By

Herod: Tetrarch of Galilee (Herod Antipas): Tyranny of

Irony: Herod Agrippa Ii to Paul

Sarcasm: Herod Agrippa Ii to Paul

Related Terms

Herod (45 Occurrences)

Herodias (7 Occurrences)

Manaen (1 Occurrence)

Birthday (4 Occurrences)

Tetrarch (5 Occurrences)

Machaerus

Hero'di-as (6 Occurrences)

Praetorium (8 Occurrences)

Claudius (3 Occurrences)

Salome (2 Occurrences)

Antipas (1 Occurrence)

Tiberias (3 Occurrences)

Blastus (1 Occurrence)

Aretas (1 Occurrence)

Archelaus (1 Occurrence)

Caesarea (20 Occurrences)

Innocents (2 Occurrences)

Quaternion

Learned (70 Occurrences)

Warned (63 Occurrences)

Pleased (172 Occurrences)

Philip's (5 Occurrences)

Birth-day (2 Occurrences)

Belonged (105 Occurrences)

Cesarea (17 Occurrences)

Saying (2162 Occurrences)

Solomon's (56 Occurrences)

Massacre (1 Occurrence)

Flavius

Philip (37 Occurrences)

Herodians (3 Occurrences)

Josephus

Region (96 Occurrences)

Kept (891 Occurrences)

Judea (50 Occurrences)

Wife (437 Occurrences)

Nabathaeans

Nabataeans

Nobleman (5 Occurrences)

Joanna (3 Occurrences)

Gadara

Wise (422 Occurrences)

Wise-men (4 Occurrences)

Greatly (297 Occurrences)

Remitted (4 Occurrences)

Danced (7 Occurrences)

During (182 Occurrences)

Medes (15 Occurrences)

Mages (5 Occurrences)

Please (324 Occurrences)

Portico (37 Occurrences)

Porch (37 Occurrences)

Brother's (46 Occurrences)

Behold (1513 Occurrences)

Beautiful (152 Occurrences)

Apparel (38 Occurrences)

Agrippa (12 Occurrences)

Appeared (137 Occurrences)

Arrested (24 Occurrences)

Account (460 Occurrences)

Judaea (45 Occurrences)

Chains (100 Occurrences)

Raised (267 Occurrences)

Risen (169 Occurrences)

Magi (4 Occurrences)

James (40 Occurrences)

Bethlehem (49 Occurrences)

Desired (144 Occurrences)

Province (66 Occurrences)

Daughter (320 Occurrences)

News (453 Occurrences)

Kill (310 Occurrences)

Star (16 Occurrences)

Palestine (1 Occurrence)

Cyprus (12 Occurrences)

Brother (402 Occurrences)

Steward (23 Occurrences)

Treasury (25 Occurrences)

Dream (82 Occurrences)

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