Acts 26:28
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Then Agrippa said to Paul, "Do you think that in such a short time you can persuade me to be a Christian?"

New Living Translation
Agrippa interrupted him. "Do you think you can persuade me to become a Christian so quickly?"

English Standard Version
And Agrippa said to Paul, “In a short time would you persuade me to be a Christian?”

New American Standard Bible
Agrippa replied to Paul, "In a short time you will persuade me to become a Christian."

King James Bible
Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then Agrippa said to Paul, "Are you going to persuade me to become a Christian so easily?""

International Standard Version
Agrippa asked Paul, "Can you so quickly persuade me to become a Christian?"

NET Bible
Agrippa said to Paul, "In such a short time are you persuading me to become a Christian?"

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Agrippa said to him, “In a little bit you will persuade me to become a Christian.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Agrippa said to Paul, "Do you think you can quickly persuade me to become a Christian?"

Jubilee Bible 2000
Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.

King James 2000 Bible
Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost you persuade me to be a Christian.

American King James Version
Then Agrippa said to Paul, Almost you persuade me to be a Christian.

American Standard Version
And Agrippa'said unto Paul, With but little persuasion thou wouldest fain make me a Christian.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And Agrippa said to Paul: In a little thou persuadest me to become a Christian.

Darby Bible Translation
And Agrippa [said] to Paul, In a little thou persuadest me to become a Christian.

English Revised Version
And Agrippa said unto Paul, With but little persuasion thou wouldest fain make me a Christian.

Webster's Bible Translation
Then Agrippa said to Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.

Weymouth New Testament
Agrippa answered, "In brief, you are doing your best to persuade me to become a Christian."

World English Bible
Agrippa said to Paul, "With a little persuasion are you trying to make me a Christian?"

Young's Literal Translation
And Agrippa said unto Paul, 'In a little thou dost persuade me to become a Christian!'
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

26:24-32 It becomes us, on all occasions, to speak the words of truth and soberness, and then we need not be troubled at the unjust censures of men. Active and laborious followers of the gospel often have been despised as dreamers or madmen, for believing such doctrines and such wonderful facts; and for attesting that the same faith and diligence, and an experience like their own, are necessary to all men, whatever their rank, in order to their salvation. But apostles and prophets, and the Son of God himself, were exposed to this charge; and none need be moved thereby, when Divine grace has made them wise unto salvation. Agrippa saw a great deal of reason for Christianity. His understanding and judgment were for the time convinced, but his heart was not changed. And his conduct and temper were widely different from the humility and spirituality of the gospel. Many are almost persuaded to be religious, who are not quite persuaded; they are under strong convictions of their duty, and of the excellence of the ways of God, yet do not pursue their convictions. Paul urged that it was the concern of every one to become a true Christian; that there is grace enough in Christ for all. He expressed his full conviction of the truth of the gospel, the absolute necessity of faith in Christ in order to salvation. Such salvation from such bondage, the gospel of Christ offers to the Gentiles; to a lost world. Yet it is with much difficulty that any person can be persuaded he needs a work of grace on his heart, like that which was needful for the conversion of the Gentiles. Let us beware of fatal hesitation in our own conduct; and recollect how far the being almost persuaded to be a Christian, is from being altogether such a one as every true believer is.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 28. - And for then, A.V.; with but little persuasion thou wouldest fain make me a Christian for almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian, A.V. With but little persuasion (ἐν ὀλίγῳ κ.τ.λ.). This saying of Agrippa's is obscure and variously explained. The A.V., following Chrysostom, Beza, Luther, etc., takes ἐν ὀλίγῳ to mean "within a little" or" almost," like the Hebrew כִּמְעַט, which is very suitable to the context. The corresponding ἐν πόλλῳ, or, as otherwise read, ἐν μεγάλῳ would then mean, as in the A.V., "altogether," and the sense of the whole passage is striking and appropriate. But there is some difficulty in getting Otis meaning out of the words. The natural way of expressing it would be παρ ὀλίγον, or ὀλίγου, or ὀλίγον δεῖ. Hence many other commentators take ἐν ὀλίγῳ to mean "in a short time," and the sense to be either "you are making short work of my conversion: you are persuading me to become a Christian as suddenly as you yourself did;" with a corresponding sense for ἐν πόλλῳ, "in a long time," i.e. whether it takes a short or a long time, I pray God you may become a Christian like myself;" or, "you are soon persuading me," you will soon persuade me if you go on any longer in this strain. Others, again, preferring the reading ἐν μεγάλῳ in ver. 29, take ἐν ὀλίγῳ to mean "with little trouble," or "with few words," as Ephesians 3:5 (understanding λόγῳ or πόνῳ), "lightly" (Alford), and then the opposite ἐν μεγάλῳ would mean "with much trouble," "with many words," i.e. "with difficulty." But this is rather a fiat rendering. Another difference of opinion is whether the words of Agrippa are to be taken ironically, or sarcastically, or jestingly, or whether they are to be taken seriously, as the words of a man shaken in his convictions and seriously impressed by what he had heard. The whole turn of the narrative seems to favor the latter view. Another view, started by Chrysostom, is that Agrippa used the words in one sense, and St. Paul (mistakenly or advisedly) took them in another. Another possible explanation is that ἐν ὀλίγῳ is here used in the sense in which Thucydides employs the phrase (it. 86 and Ephesians 4:26), Τὴν ἐν ὀλίγῳ ναυμάχιαν and Ἐν ὀλίγῳ στρατοπεδευομένος, viz. "in a narrow place;" and that Agrippa meant to say, "By your appeal to the prophets you press me hard; you have got me into a corner. I am in a στενοχωρία, a ' narrow room; ' I hardly know how to get out of it." The ἐν μεγάλῳ would then mean a" large room," a εὐρυχωρία (Psalm 30:8). This would suppose ἐν ὀλίγῳ and ἐν μεγάλῳ to have become proverbial phrases.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Then Agrippa said unto Paul,.... Either seriously or ironically; rather the former, arising from the convictions of his mind, which he could not stifle nor conceal:

almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian; to profess faith in Jesus as the Messiah, to embrace his doctrine, and submit to his ordinances, which is to be a Christian, at least externally: and when he says "almost", or "in a little", his meaning is, that within a little, or very near, he was of being persuaded to embrace Christianity; or in a little matter, and in some respects; or rather in a few words, and in a small space of time, Paul had strangely wrought upon him to incline to the Christian religion; though the first sense, that he was almost, or within a little of being a Christian, seems to be the best, as appears by the apostle's reply to it: what it is to be a real Christian; see Gill on Acts 11:26. An almost Christian is one that has much light and knowledge, but no grace; he may know something of himself and of sin, of its being a violation of the law of God, and of the bad consequences of it, but has not true repentance for it; he may know much of Christ in a speculative way, concerning his person and offices, as the devils themselves do, and of the good things which come by him, as peace, pardon, righteousness, and salvation; but has no application of these things to himself; he may have a large notional knowledge of the doctrines of the Gospel, but has no experience of the power, sweetness, and comfort of them in his own soul; all his knowledge is unsanctified, and without practice: he is one that has a taste of divine things, but has not the truth of them; he may taste of the heavenly gift, of the good word of God, and of the powers of the world to come; yet it is but a taste, a superficial one, which he has; he does not savour and relish these things, nor is he nourished by them: he has a great deal of faith in the historical way, and sometimes a bold confidence and assurance of everlasting happiness; but has not faith of the right kind, which is spiritual and special, which is the faith of God's elect, the gift of God, and the operation of his Spirit; by which the soul beholds the glory, fulness, and suitableness of Christ, under a sense of need, and goes forth to him, renouncing everything of self, and lays hold upon him, and trusts in him for salvation; and which works by love to Christ and his people, and has with it the fruits of righteousness: he may express a great deal of flashy affectation to the word, and the ministers of it, for a while, but has nothing solid and substantial in him; he may partake of the Holy Ghost, of his gifts largely, but not of special and internal grace; and indeed he can only be an almost Christian, that becomes one merely through the persuasion of men: it is one part of the Gospel ministry to persuade men, but this of itself is ineffectual; a real Christian is made so by the power of divine grace. Agrippa was only persuaded, and but almost persuaded by the apostle to be a Christian, but not by the Lord, nor altogether, who persuades Japheth to dwell in the tents of Shem.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

28. Almost—or, "in a little time."

thou persuadest me to be a Christian—Most modern interpreters think the ordinary translation inadmissible, and take the meaning to be, "Thou thinkest to make me with little persuasion (or small trouble) a Christian"—but I am not to be so easily turned. But the apostle's reply can scarcely suit any but the sense given in our authorized version, which is that adopted by Chrysostom and some of the best scholars since. The objection on which so much stress is laid, that the word "Christian" was at that time only a term of contempt, has no force except on the other side; for taking it in that view, the sense is, "Thou wilt soon have me one of that despised sect."

Acts 26:28 Additional Commentaries
Context
Festus Interrupts Paul's Defense
27"King Agrippa, do you believe the Prophets? I know that you do." 28Agrippa replied to Paul, "In a short time you will persuade me to become a Christian." 29And Paul said, "I would wish to God, that whether in a short or long time, not only you, but also all who hear me this day, might become such as I am, except for these chains."…
Cross References
Acts 11:26
and when he found him, he brought him to Antioch. So for a whole year Barnabas and Saul met with the church and taught great numbers of people. The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch.

Acts 26:27
King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know you do."
Treasury of Scripture

Then Agrippa said to Paul, Almost you persuade me to be a Christian.

Almost.

Acts 26:29 And Paul said, I would to God, that not only you, but also all that …

Acts 24:25 And as he reasoned of righteousness, temperance, and judgment to …

Ezekiel 33:31 And they come to you as the people comes, and they sit before you …

Matthew 10:18 And you shall be brought before governors and kings for my sake, …

Mark 6:20 For Herod feared John, knowing that he was a just man and an holy, …

Mark 10:17-22 And when he was gone forth into the way, there came one running, …

2 Corinthians 4:2 But have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in …

James 1:23,24 For if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like to …

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