Matthew 8:17
New International Version
This was to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah: “He took up our infirmities and bore our diseases.”

New Living Translation
This fulfilled the word of the Lord through the prophet Isaiah, who said, “He took our sicknesses and removed our diseases.”

English Standard Version
This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “He took our illnesses and bore our diseases.”

Berean Study Bible
This was to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah: “He took on our infirmities and carried our diseases.”

Berean Literal Bible
so that it might be fulfilled that having been spoken through the prophet Isaiah, saying, "He Himself took our infirmities, and bore our diseases."

King James Bible
That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses.

New King James Version
that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Isaiah the prophet, saying: “ He Himself took our infirmities And bore our sicknesses.”

New American Standard Bible
This happened so that what was spoken through Isaiah the prophet would be fulfilled: “HE HIMSELF TOOK OUR ILLNESSES AND CARRIED AWAY OUR DISEASES.”

NASB 1995
This was to fulfill what was spoken through Isaiah the prophet: “HE HIMSELF TOOK OUR INFIRMITIES AND CARRIED AWAY OUR DISEASES.”

NASB 1977
in order that what was spoken through Isaiah the prophet might be fulfilled, saying, “HE HIMSELF TOOK OUR INFIRMITIES, AND CARRIED AWAY OUR DISEASES.”

Amplified Bible
so that He fulfilled what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “HE HIMSELF TOOK OUR INFIRMITIES [upon Himself] AND CARRIED AWAY OUR DISEASES.”

Christian Standard Bible
so that what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled: He himself took our weaknesses and carried our diseases.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
so that what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled: He Himself took our weaknesses and carried our diseases.

American Standard Version
that it might be fulfilled which was spoken through Isaiah the prophet, saying: Himself took our infirmities, and bare our diseases.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
So that would be fulfilled which was said by Isaiah the Prophet, who said: “He will take our pains and he will bear our sicknesses.”

Contemporary English Version
So God's promise came true, just as the prophet Isaiah had said, "He healed our diseases and made us well."

Douay-Rheims Bible
That it might be fulfilled, which was spoken by the prophet Isaias, saying: He took our infirmities, and bore our diseases.

English Revised Version
that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Isaiah the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our diseases.

Good News Translation
He did this to make come true what the prophet Isaiah had said, "He himself took our sickness and carried away our diseases."

GOD'S WORD® Translation
So what the prophet Isaiah had said came true: "He took away our weaknesses and removed our diseases."

International Standard Version
This was to fulfill what was declared by the prophet Isaiah when he said, "It was he who took our illnesses away and removed our diseases."

Literal Standard Version
that it might be fulfilled that was spoken through Isaiah the prophet, saying, “He took our sicknesses Himself, and bore the diseases.”

NET Bible
In this way what was spoken by Isaiah the prophet was fulfilled: "He took our weaknesses and carried our diseases."

New Heart English Bible
that it might be fulfilled which was spoken through Isaiah the prophet, saying, "He took our infirmities, and bore our diseases."

Weymouth New Testament
in order that this prediction of the Prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled, "He took on Him our weaknesses, and bore the burden of our diseases."

World English Bible
that it might be fulfilled which was spoken through Isaiah the prophet, saying: "He took our infirmities, and bore our diseases."

Young's Literal Translation
that it might be fulfilled that was spoken through Isaiah the prophet, saying, 'Himself took our infirmities, and the sicknesses he did bear.'

Additional Translations ...
Context
Jesus Heals at Peter's House
16When evening came, many who were demon-possessed were brought to Jesus, and He drove out the spirits with a word and healed all the sick. 17This was to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah: “He took on our infirmities and carried our diseases.” 18When Jesus saw a large crowd around Him, He gave orders to cross to the other side of the sea.…

Cross References
Isaiah 53:4
Surely He took on our infirmities and carried our sorrows; yet we considered Him stricken by God, struck down and afflicted.

Mark 1:32
That evening, after sunset, people brought to Jesus all who were sick and demon-possessed,

Luke 4:40
At sunset, all who were ill with various diseases were brought to Jesus, and laying His hands on each one, He healed them.

2 Corinthians 12:10
That is why, for the sake of Christ, I delight in weaknesses, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions, in difficulties. For when I am weak, then I am strong.


Treasury of Scripture

That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bore our sicknesses.

it might.

Matthew 1:22
Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying,

Matthew 2:15,23
And was there until the death of Herod: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Out of Egypt have I called my son…

Himself.

Isaiah 53:4
Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted.

1 Peter 2:24
Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.









(17) Himself took our infirmities.--The citation is interesting as showing St. Matthew's way of dealing with Messianic prophecies. We see in Isaiah 53 throughout a picture of our Lord's spiritual work of redemption, and the words quoted are almost the cardinal text for the special view of the atonement, which sees in the sufferings of Christ the freely accepted penalty that was due for the transgressions of mankind. The Evangelist, with the memory of that evening present to his mind, saw them fulfilled in this removal of the "infirmities" and "sicknesses" that oppressed the bodies of men. It was not merely that He came, as one of boundless wealth, who might scatter alms broadcast, but that He Himself "took" and "bore" the sufferings which He removed. He suffered with those He saw suffer. The power to heal was intimately connected with the intensity of His sympathy, and so was followed (as analogous works of love are followed in those who are most Christ-like in their lives) by weariness and physical exhaustion. What is related by St. Mark and St. Luke of our Lord's seeking out the refuge of solitude at the earliest dawn of the day that followed, is entirely in harmony with the view thus suggested.

Verse 17. - Matthew only. A summary statement of Christ's relation to diseases. That it might be fulfilled (o%pw plhrwqh = ""); Matthew 2:23, note. Which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses; diseases (Revised Version); Isaiah 53:4, from the Hebrew. Took (ἔλαβεν) regards the transference, the assumption; bare (ἐβάστασεν), the oppressiveness; infirmities, negative; diseases, positive. St. Matthew in this verse calls attention to two points. First, that prophecy had foretold that Christ would heal the sick. For this he might have adduced Isaiah 35:5, 6, and similar passages; but as one verse will serve his double purpose, he prefers it. Secondly, that the method by which Christ did this was specially noteworthy. He did not perform miracles by magic (as is commonly asserted of him in the Talmud; cf. Laible, 'Jesus Christ in Talmud,' p. 44: Berlin, 1891),nor by the power of God exerted as it were externally on his behalf, nor by his own inherent Divine power, but by himself bearing the sicknesses that he removed. He wrought his miracles at his own expense,and that expense the greatest. The thought is far-reaching, and implies both that he bore the ultimate cause of sickness, the sin of the world (John 1:29), and also that each miracle of healing meant for him a fresh realization of what bearing the sin of the world included. In other words, the passage in Isaiah, as interpreted by St. Matthew, refers, not only to the Passion as such, but also to Christ's suffering an earnest and a foretaste of it at each miracle. May not this have been in part the cause of his sigh at one miracle (Mark 7:34), and his deep emotion at another (John 11:33)? Observe that this may be the complementary side of his experience recorded in Mark 5:30 (parallel passage: Luke 8:46), that "power" went out of him. A miracle of healing, though performed in momentary unconsciousness of what was taking place, still necessitated personal contact with sin, which to Christ's whole nature meant moral effort. The utterance recorded by Origen, "For those that are sick! was sick, and' for those that hunger I suffered hunger, and for those that thirst I suffered thirst" (Bishop Westcott, 'Introd.,' Appendix C; Resch, 'Agmpha,' Log. 47), probably expresses the same thought as our verse, though in the language of Matthew 25:35, 36. A similar idea seems to underlie the well-known saying of Talm. Bab., 'Sanh.,' 98b, with reference to Messiah, "The Leper of the house of Rabbi is his name; for it is said, 'Surely he hath berne our griefs, and carried our sorrows.'" On this and on Raymund Martini's false reading, "the Sick One," vide Dalman ('Leid. Mess.,' p. 36: 1888).

Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek
This was
ὅπως (hopōs)
Conjunction
Strong's 3704: From hos and pos; what(-ever) how, i.e. In the manner that (as adverb or conjunction of coincidence, intentional or actual).

to fulfill
πληρωθῇ (plērōthē)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 4137: From pleres; to make replete, i.e. to cram, level up, or to furnish, satisfy, execute, finish, verify, etc.

what
τὸ (to)
Article - Nominative Neuter Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

was spoken
ῥηθὲν (rhēthen)
Verb - Aorist Participle Passive - Nominative Neuter Singular
Strong's 2046: Probably a fuller form of rheo; an alternate for epo in certain tenses; to utter, i.e. Speak or say.

through
διὰ (dia)
Preposition
Strong's 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

the
τοῦ (tou)
Article - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

prophet
προφήτου (prophētou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's 4396: From a compound of pro and phemi; a foreteller; by analogy, an inspired speaker; by extension, a poet.

Isaiah:
Ἠσαΐου (Ēsaiou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's 2268: Isaiah, the prophet. Of Hebrew origin; Hesaias, an Israelite.

“He took on
ἔλαβεν (elaben)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 2983: (a) I receive, get, (b) I take, lay hold of.

our
ἡμῶν (hēmōn)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 1st Person Plural
Strong's 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

infirmities,
ἀσθενείας (astheneias)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's 769: From asthenes; feebleness; by implication, malady; morally, frailty.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

carried
ἐβάστασεν (ebastasen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 941: Perhaps remotely derived from the base of basis; to lift, literally or figuratively.

our
τὰς (tas)
Article - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

diseases.”
νόσους (nosous)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's 3554: A disease, malady, sickness. Of uncertain affinity; a malady.


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