Hebrews 12:16
New International Version
See that no one is sexually immoral, or is godless like Esau, who for a single meal sold his inheritance rights as the oldest son.

New Living Translation
Make sure that no one is immoral or godless like Esau, who traded his birthright as the firstborn son for a single meal.

English Standard Version
that no one is sexually immoral or unholy like Esau, who sold his birthright for a single meal.

Berean Study Bible
See to it that no one is sexually immoral, or is godless like Esau, who for a single meal sold his birthright.

Berean Literal Bible
lest there be any fornicator or profane person, as Esau, who for one meal sold his birthright.

New American Standard Bible
that there be no immoral or godless person like Esau, who sold his own birthright for a single meal.

King James Bible
Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright.

Christian Standard Bible
And make sure that there isn't any immoral or irreverent person like Esau, who sold his birthright in exchange for a single meal.

Contemporary English Version
Watch out for immoral and ungodly people like Esau, who sold his future blessing for only one meal.

Good News Translation
Let no one become immoral or unspiritual like Esau, who for a single meal sold his rights as the older son.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
And make sure that there isn't any immoral or irreverent person like Esau, who sold his birthright in exchange for one meal.

International Standard Version
No one should be immoral or godless like Esau, who sold his birthright for a single meal.

NET Bible
And see to it that no one becomes an immoral or godless person like Esau, who sold his own birthright for a single meal.

New Heart English Bible
that there be no sexually immoral or profane person like Esau, who sold his own birthright for one meal.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Or lest a man be found among you as a fornicator, or debauched, like Esau, who for one meal sold his birthright.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Make sure that no one commits sexual sin or is as concerned about earthly things as Esau was. He sold his rights as the firstborn son for a single meal.

New American Standard 1977
that there be no immoral or godless person like Esau, who sold his own birthright for a single meal.

Jubilee Bible 2000
lest there be any fornicator or profane person as Esau, who for one morsel of food sold his birthright.

King James 2000 Bible
Lest there be any immoral, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of food sold his birthright.

American King James Version
Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright.

American Standard Version
lest there be any fornication, or profane person, as Esau, who for one mess of meat sold his own birthright.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau; who for one mess, sold his first birthright.

Darby Bible Translation
lest [there be] any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one meal sold his birthright;

English Revised Version
lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one mess of meat sold his own birthright.

Webster's Bible Translation
Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of food sold his birth-right.

Weymouth New Testament
lest there be a fornicator, or an ungodly person like Esau, who, in return for a single meal, parted with the birthright which belonged to him.

World English Bible
lest there be any sexually immoral person, or profane person, like Esau, who sold his birthright for one meal.

Young's Literal Translation
lest any one be a fornicator, or a profane person, as Esau, who in exchange for one morsel of food did sell his birthright,
Study Bible
A Call to Holiness
15Be careful that no one falls short of the grace of God, so that no root of bitterness will spring up to cause trouble and defile many. 16See to it that no one is sexually immoral, or is godless like Esau, who sold his birthright for a single meal. 17For you know that afterward, when he wanted to inherit the blessing, he was rejected. He could find no ground for repentance, though he sought the blessing with tears.…
Cross References
Genesis 25:33
"Swear to me first," Jacob said. So Esau swore to Jacob and sold him the birthright.

1 Timothy 1:9
We realize that law is not enacted for the righteous, but for the lawless and rebellious, for the ungodly and sinful, for the unholy and profane, for killers of father or mother, for murderers,

Hebrews 13:4
Marriage should be honored by all and the marriage bed kept undefiled, for God will judge the sexually immoral and adulterers.

Treasury of Scripture

Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright.

any fornicator.

Hebrews 13:4
Marriage is honourable in all, and the bed undefiled: but whoremongers and adulterers God will judge.

Mark 7:21
For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed evil thoughts, adulteries, fornications, murders,

Acts 15:20,29
But that we write unto them, that they abstain from pollutions of idols, and from fornication, and from things strangled, and from blood…

as Esau.

Genesis 25:31-34
And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright…

Genesis 27:36
And he said, Is not he rightly named Jacob? for he hath supplanted me these two times: he took away my birthright; and, behold, now he hath taken away my blessing. And he said, Hast thou not reserved a blessing for me?







Lexicon
[See to it] that
μή (mē)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3361: Not, lest. A primary particle of qualified negation; not, lest; also (whereas ou expects an affirmative one) whether.

[no one is]
τις (tis)
Interrogative / Indefinite Pronoun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 5100: Any one, some one, a certain one or thing. An enclitic indefinite pronoun; some or any person or object.

sexually immoral,
πόρνος (pornos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4205: A fornicator, man who prostitutes himself. From pernemi; a prostitute, i.e. a debauchee.

or
(ē)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2228: Or, than. A primary particle of distinction between two connected terms; disjunctive, or; comparative, than.

is godless
βέβηλος (bebēlos)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 952: Permitted to be trodden, accessible. From the base of basis and belos; accessible, i.e. heathenish, wicked.

like
ὡς (hōs)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 5613: Probably adverb of comparative from hos; which how, i.e. In that manner.

Esau,
Ἠσαῦ (Ēsau)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2269: Esau, elder son of Isaac the patriarch, brother of Jacob. Of Hebrew origin; Esau, an Edomite.

who
ὃς (hos)
Personal / Relative Pronoun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3739: Who, which, what, that.

sold
ἀπέδετο (apedeto)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Middle - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 591: From apo and didomi; to give away, i.e. Up, over, back, etc.

his
ἑαυτοῦ (heautou)
Reflexive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1438: Himself, herself, itself.

birthright
πρωτοτόκια (prōtotokia)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 4415: The birthright, the rights of the first-born. From prototokos; primogeniture.

for
ἀντὶ (anti)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 473: A primary particle; opposite, i.e. Instead or because of.

a single
μιᾶς (mias)
Adjective - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1520: One. (including the neuter Hen); a primary numeral; one.

meal.
βρώσεως (brōseōs)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1035: (a) abstr: eating, (b) food, a meal, (c) rust. From the base of bibrosko; eating; by extension food.
(16) Lest there be.--Better (as in the last verse), whether there be. Though Jewish tradition (see, for example, the Targum of Palestine on Genesis 25:29) affirms that Esau was a man of impure life, it is not probable that he is so represented in this verse. Here he is mentioned as a type of "the profane," who care not for divine things, but only for the gains and pleasures of this world.

Who for one morsel of meat.--Better, who for one meal sold his own birthright (Genesis 25:29-34). We cannot suppose that the writer has in thought the material rights of the firstborn, such as his claim on pre-eminence and, possibly (see Deuteronomy 21:17), on a larger share of his father's possessions. Tradition relates that, up to the time of Aaron, priestly functions were discharged by each firstborn son (comp. Numbers 3:5-12); and to the line of the firstborn would seem to belong that "blessing of Abraham" (Genesis 28:4) which every one who shared Abraham's faith would earnestly desire to possess.

Verses 16, 17. - Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright. For ye know how that afterward, when he would have inherited (i.e. desired to inherit) the blessing, he was rejected: for he found no place of repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears. The word "fornicator" is to be understood literally, not figuratively (as Ebrard) of spiritual fornication (see ἁγιασμὸν, ver. 14). Βέβηλος ("profane") denotes one outside the sphere of sanctity, and so debarred from sacred privileges. Esau is appropriately adduced as a notable instance in the Old Testament of a person thus profane, and especially, in the way of warning, of one who lost irrecoverably the privileges which in his profaneness he had scorned. It is immaterial whether Esau himself is intended to be designated as a fornicator (πόρνος) as well as profane (βέβηλος). The essential moral of his history is this: being the firstborn of Israel, and so the primary inheritor of the promises made to Abraham, he set no store by the privilege, and so lost it irretrievably. In early life he so lightly esteemed his birthright as the eldest born (carrying with it, as is supposed, in the patriarchal age, the priesthood of the family, and in his case, as might be presumed, the custody and transmission of the promises) that he parted with it for the gratification of a passing appetite. His words on that occasion expressed the limit of his aims and interests: "Behold, I am at the point to die: and what profit shall this birthright do to me?" Later in life he nevertheless presented himself to claim the blessing of the firstborn from his dying father, but found that he had been forestalled. It does not appear that he had meanwhile changed his mode of life or made amends for his former carelessness; still, he felt now that he had lost something worth having, and was grieved exceedingly. But not even his "great and exceeding bitter cry" availed then to recover what was forfeited. And so neither he nor his seed had part or lot in the Abrahamic promises: the time of opportunity was gone forever. There is some doubt with regard to the latter part of ver. 17,

(1) as to whether "it" (αἰτήν) in "he sought it" refers to "repentance" (μετανοίας) or to "the blessing" (τὴν εὐλογίαν);

(2) as to what "place of repentance" means. If "it" refers to "repentance," it is difficult to see how Esau's own repentance can be meant; for not only does seeking repentance with tears seem in itself to imply the capability of it, but also the "great and exceeding bitter cry" to which allusion is made was, not because he could not himself repent, but because he could not get the blessing. Hence, if "it" refers to "repentance," it must be repentance, i.e. change of mind, in Isaac that is meant, or rather in God, against whose will Isaac could not go; cf. "God is not a man... that he should repent" (Numbers 23:19). Of such change of mind and purpose it may be meant that Esau found no place. This seems to be the view of many modern interpreters, though not of Bengel, De Wette, Bleek, Hofmann, Delitzsch, Alford, or of Luther, Calvin, Grotius, or any of the Greek Fathers. Against it is the consideration that such is not the more obvious meaning of "he found no place of repentance," taken by itself, especially as μετανοία is always elsewhere in the New Testament (though not always in the LXX.) used for a person's change of mind with respect to his own misdoings (cf. supra, Hebrews 6:6). Difficulty on this ground is removed if, taking the clause, "for he found no place of repentance," as parenthetical, we refer αὐτὴν to τὴν εὐλογίαν, preceding. This is by no means a forced construction of the sentence, and it is supported (as above intimated) by the fact that in Genesis it is the blessing itself that Esau is expressly said to have craved in his "great and exceeding bitter cry:" "Hast thou but one blessing, my father? bless me, even me also, O my father. And Esau lifted up his voice, and wept." Thus we may render either, "When he desired to inherit the blessing, he was rejected; for he found no place of repentance [i.e. of change of mind in the bestower of the blessing], though he sought it [i.e. such change of mind] with tears;" or, "When he desired to inherit the blessing, he was rejected (for he found no place of repentance), though he sought it [i.e. the blessing] with tears." If, the latter rendering being adopted, Esau's own repentance be intended, the idea maybe, either that there was no place left in which even a real repentance could avail, or that of a real repentance he had become incapable; for his tears might be those only of vexation and remorse, not expressing any more appreciation than before of the birthright in its religious aspect. Ebrard's remark, that his conduct as related in Genesis 33, shows "a changed heart," and hence a true repentance, is not to the point. For all that there appears is that he had got over his angry feeling towards his brother; it is by no means implied - rather the contrary - that he would have preferred his destiny to his own, or that his views of life had risen above thoughts of worldly prosperity. We observe, further, that nothing is implied one way or the other as to Esau's own salvation; it is only the privilege of being the patriarch of the chosen seed that he is said to have thus irrecoverably forfeited. But his example is adduced as a warning to Christians with regard to their still more precious inheritance, which does involve their own eternal prospects. The warning to them is similar to those of Hebrews 6:4, etc., and Hebrews 10:26, etc., to the effect that sacred privileges, if persistently slighted, may be lost beyond recovery. And if the passage before us seems to imply, according to one view of it, what the former ones were found not to do, the possible inefficacy of a true repentance, however late, - we may say that, even if this is implied of Esau with respect to his lost blessing, it is not therefore necessarily implied of Christians with respect to their personal salvation; or that, if it is implied of them, it is not till their probation in this life is over that a "place of repentance" in this sense can for them be found no more (cf. the parable of the ten virgins (Matthew 25:1, etc.); also Matthew 7:22, etc.; Luke 13:24, etc.). One of Dr. Newman's Parochial Sermons ("Life the Season of Repentance," vol. 6. 'Sermon' 2) strikingly sets forth this view. See also 'Christian Year' (Second Sunday in Lent), with the appended note: "Esau's probation, as far as his birthright was concerned, was quite over when he uttered the cry in the text. His despondency, therefore, is not parallel to anything on this side the grave." 12:12-17 A burden of affliction is apt to make the Christian's hands hang down, and his knees grow feeble, to dispirit him and discourage him; but against this he must strive, that he may better run his spiritual race and course. Faith and patience enable believers to follow peace and holiness, as a man follows his calling constantly, diligently, and with pleasure. Peace with men, of all sects and parties, will be favourable to our pursuit of holiness. But peace and holiness go together; there can be not right peace without holiness. Where persons fail of having the true grace of God, corruption will prevail and break forth; beware lest any unmortified lust in the heart, which seems to be dead, should spring up, to trouble and disturb the whole body. Falling away from Christ is the fruit of preferring the delights of the flesh, to the blessing of God, and the heavenly inheritance, as Esau did. But sinners will not always have such mean thoughts of the Divine blessing and inheritance as they now have. It agrees with the profane man's disposition, to desire the blessing, yet to despise the means whereby the blessing is to be gained. But God will neither sever the means from the blessing, nor join the blessing with the satisfying of man's lusts. God's mercy and blessing were never sought carefully and not obtained.
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